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Supermarine Walrus making a deck landing
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Supermarine Walrus making a deck landing

Supermarine Walrus making a deck landing Here we see a Supermarine Walrus making a deck landing on a British aircraft carrier in the Far EastHow to cite this article:Rickard, J (23 July 2010), Supermarine Walrus making a deck landing , http://www.

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The Evolving Representation of the Early Islamic Empire and Its Religion on Coin Imagery

The Evolving Representation of the Early Islamic Empire and Its Religion on Coin ImageryBy Stefan HeidemannThe Qur’an in Context, edited by Angelika Neuwirth, Nicolai Sinai and Michael Marx (Brill, 2010)Introduction: How did the theology of Islam and its idea of an empire evolve, based on the Hellenistic Romano-Iranian foundation, in the face of Christianity, Judaism, Neo-Platonism and Zoroastrianism?
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Confraternities, Memoria, and Law in Late Medieval Italy

Thomas FrankConfraternitas: Vol 17, No 1 (2006)AbstractTo view medieval brotherhoods or confraternities as associations of laymen or clerics with predominantly religious functions almost automatically leads to the conclusion that fraternity and memoria have much in common. This, at least, can be assumed if we focus on the religious or socio-religious dimension of the notion, marked in the following article by the Latin term memoria.
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Chronological systems in Roman – Byzantine Palestine and Arabia: the evidence of the dated Greek inscriptions

Chronological systems in Roman – Byzantine Palestine and Arabia: the evidence of the dated Greek inscriptionsBy Yiannis E. Meimaris, in collaboration with K. Kritikaou and P. BougiaResearch Center for Greek and Roman Antiquity, 1992Introduction: The study of the Greek inscriptions from Roman-Byzantine Palestine and Arabia and any attempt to set them against proper historical background is facilitated by the dates given in the inscriptions themselves.
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Coastal landscapes and early Christianity in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria

Coastal landscapes and early Christianity in Anglo-Saxon NorthumbriaBy David PettsEstonian Journal of Archaeology,Vol.13:2 (2009)Abstract: This paper explores the ways in which coastal landscapes were used by the early church in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria. The coastal highways were a key element of the socio-political landscape of the Northumbrian kingdom, with many key secular and ecclesiastical power centres being located in proximity to the sea.
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Mehmed the Conqueror and the Equestrian Statue of the Augustaion

Mehmed the Conqueror and the Equestrian Statue of the AugustaionBy J. RabyIllinois Classical Studies, Vol. 12:2 (1987)Introduction: One of the landmarks of Constantinople was the colossal equestrian statue which stood on top of a hundred-foot-high column outside Hagia Sophia. Known as the Augustaion from the square in which it stood, the bronze statue was erected by Justinian, although in all probability it was not his own but a re-used work of Theodosius I or II, The statue’s size alone — some 27 feet in height—would have ensured its fame, but it was particularly esteemed as a symbol of Byzantine dominion and a talisman of the City.
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A Chinese in the Nubian and Abyssinian Kingdoms (8th Century): The visit of Du Huan to Molin-guo and Laobosa

A Chinese in the Nubian and Abyssinian Kingdoms (8th Century): The visit of Du Huan to Molin-guo and LaobosaBy Wolbert SmidtChroniques yéménites, Vol. 9 (2001)Abstract: This article focuses on the first Chinese whose presence in Africa is clearly documented. Due to the geographical curiosity of the T’ang dynasty, extracts of an 8th century travel report of a Chinese military officer, Du Huan, were documented and preserved.
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Heresy and Sanctity at the Time of Boniface VIII

Heresy and Sanctity at the Time of Boniface VIIBy J.H. DentonToleration and repression in the Middle Ages (2002)Introduction: Personal attacks upon political and religious leaders, in whatever age they have taken place, may help us to understand the kinds of behaviour not tolerated in that age. But the evidence surrounding such attacks is rarely easy to interpret.
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Mixed Marriages in a Polyethnic Society: A Case Study of Tana, 14th – 15th Centuries

Mixed Marriages in a Polyethnic Society: A Case Study of Tana, 14th – 15th CenturiesBy S. KarpovToleration and repression in the Middle Ages (2002)Introduction: The area of the Azov Sea and of the Don estuary was of a considerable importance for Byzantium (in the 12th century it was under direct Byzantine control) as a source of supply of grain, salt and fish for Constantinople and the Northern Anatolia.
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Rethinking Jagiełło Hungary

Rethinking Jagiełło HungaryBy Martyn RadyCentral Europe, Vol.3:1 (2005)Introduction: Whereas in western Europe, the fifteenth century compares badly with the sixteenth, in Central Europe the reverse is the case. During the sixteenth century, the region suffered on its eastern and southern flanks from the advances of Muscovy, the Crimean Tatars and the Turks and, on its western, from the dynastic ambitions of the Habsburgs.
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Pristina libertas: liberty and the Anglo-Saxons revisited

Pristina libertas: liberty and the Anglo-Saxons revisitedBy Julia CrickTransactions of the Royal Historical Society, Vol.14 (2004)Abstract: The association between liberty and the Anglo-Saxons has been rendered mythical by later retellings, both in the Middle Ages and afterwards. This later history notwithstanding, it is argued here that liberty occupied a significant place in the early English documentary record.
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Jewish pietism of the Sufi type: A particular trend of mysticisme in Medieval Egypt

Jewish pietism of the Sufi type: A particular trend of mysticisme in Medieval EgyptBy Mireille LoubetBulletin du Centre de recherche français de Jérusalem, Vol.7 (2000)Introduction: The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to a poorly known trend in Judaism that developed in the medieval Jewish community of Cairo, and forms the background for the manuscript that I am in the process of translatingA brief description to the features of this manuscript will serve as an introduction to my approach, which aims at shedding light on a successful encounter between Islam and Judaism.
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E-Science for Medievalists: Options, Challenges, Solutions and Opportunities

E-Science for Medievalists: Options, Challenges, Solutions and OpportunitiesBy Peter Ainsworth and Michael MeredithDHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly, Vol.3:4 (2009)Abstract: Medievalists typically resort to parchment for primary research and when editing their sources. Not always accurately catalogued, manuscripts copied onto animal skins may have started life in the same workshop but over the centuries have become dispersed, coming to rest in libraries all over the world; bringing these together entails travel, microfilm purchases and reassembly and collation of the data within reach of a microfilm reader.
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Some Observations on Infanticide in Medieval Muslim Society

Some Observations on Infanticide in Medieval Muslim SocietyBy Avner GiladiInternational Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 2, (1990)Introduction: Infanticide is known to have been a common means of birth control from early, apparently even prehistoric, times. In societies that lacked any precise knowledge of the fertilization process and consequently methods for its prevention, infanticide was used more frequently than other known methods of population limitation, such as abstention from intercourse and abortion.
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The Cult of ‘Maria Regina’ in Early Medieval Rome

The Cult of ‘Maria Regina’ in Early Medieval RomeBy John OsbornePaper given at the Norwegian Institute in Rome (2004)Introduction: Few cities in the Christian world can boast such a deep connection to the cult of Mary as can the city of Rome, and none can claim a longer history of depicting her in art, stretching back in time at least to the early years of the third century in the catacomb of Priscilla on the via Salaria.
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Max Dvořák and the History of Medieval Art

Max Dvořák and the History of Medieval ArtBy Hans H. AurenhammerJournal of Art Historiography, No.2 (2010)Abstract: Max Dvořák is known primarily for his book Kunstgeschichte als Geistesgeschichte as well as for his modernist interpretations of Tintoretto and El Greco which led to the rehabilitation of Mannerism.
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Lineage strategies and the control of widows in Renaissance Florence

Lineage strategies and the control of widows in Renaissance FlorenceBy Isabelle ChabotWidowhood in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, edited by Sandra Cavallo and Lyndan Warner (Longman, 1999)Introduction: ‘God send her a hundred years of misery to repay her for her madness!’: this was how Francesco Davizzi cursed his sister – whom he also referred to as a ‘beast’ and ‘ungracious female’ – when he came to know what sort of life she had chosen.
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The Vagantendichtung: The Secular Latin Poetry of the Wandering Scholars of the Middle Ages

The Vagantendichtung: The Secular Latin Poetry of the Wandering Scholars of the Middle AgesBy David ZakarianMaster’s Thesis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (2009)Introduction: The Middle Ages can undoubtedly be considered to be one of the most important stages in the formation of modern Western civilisation, since it is the very historical period when the national identity of virtually all the contemporary European nations is forged.
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