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Trailer: Watergate

Trailer: Watergate

Watch a trailer of the new 3-night event Watergate, premiering Friday, November 2 at 9/8c.


Trailer: Watergate - HISTORY

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‘Watergate’: History Sets Documentary Series On That Other Presidential Scandal

As political journalists take a bit of a breather with President Trump on foreign soil, History has seized on the opportunity to make a headline of its own. The cable channel has ordered Watergate, what it calls the “definitive” documentary series about the scandal and cover-up that forced President Richard Nixon out of office.

Produced and directed by Oscar winner Charles Ferguson (Inside Job), the series will look into the granddaddy of American disgraces that started with the bungled 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee offices at the Watergate complex in D.C. and ended with the only presidential resignation in U.S. history. The program also will touch on topics including Vietnam, the unrest of the 1960s, a near World War, the opening of China and the moment when an unlikely group of heroes from both political parties band together and bring down the White House and send more than 40 people to jail

&ldquoThe Watergate investigation transfixed America and the entire world for two years,&rdquo said Paul Buccieri, President of A+E Studios and A+E Networks Portfolio Group, parent company of History. “Forty- five years later , this epic story continues to fascinate. From the corrupt politicians to the tenacious special prosecutors, judges and journalists, the scandal is replete with heroes and villains alike.&rdquo


History Channel’s ‘Watergate’ Plays Like a Breathless Thriller

Like Ken Burns on steroids, Oscar-winning documentarian Charles Ferguson (Inside Job) takes a punchy, in-your-face approach to his retelling of the political scandal that glued a nation to their TV sets during the summer of 1973.

What emerged from those intense Senate hearings, and a protracted battle over sensationally damning White House tapes, would culminate in the resignation of President Richard Nixon (above) a year later.

'House of Cards': Robin Wright Says Claire Underwood Wants to Create a 'More Positive' Legacy

In six hours over three nights, Ferguson’s Watergate (puckishly subtitled “Or: How We Learned to Stop an Out of Control President”) often plays like a breathless thriller. Even though we know the outcome, the scope of the labyrinthine cover-up of the hapless Watergate burglary, and the ruthless nature of the scheming within the Oval Office, remain staggering more than 40 years later.

In dramatizing the tapes, though, Ferguson veers into near-parody. As Nixon, Tony winner Douglas Hodge scowls, growls and blusters like a dyspeptic Ralph Kramden, nowhere near as menacing as the genuine article we see in news footage from televised addresses and combative press conferences. At times the reenactments have the feel of a Saturday Night Live spoof, except each word is real.

The documentary is on firmer ground in its coverage of the Senate hearings and the subsequent House impeachment proceedings, with reflections from politicians, lawyers and journalists (including Nixon nemesis Dan Rather) embroiled in the furor. They, and we, still haven’t gotten over it.

Watergate, Series Premiere, Friday, Nov. 2, 9/8c, History


Watergate: History Orders Documentary Series from Academy Award Winner

History is on the case. Today, the network announced they’ve ordered a new TV series called Watergate.

From Academy Award-winner Charles Ferguson, the docuseries will explore “the full story of the conspiracy led by Nixon and his White House staff, and how they were brought to justice.” The series will combine archival material and new interviews with “journalists, senior Nixon Administration officials, members of Congress, and prosecutors.”

History has not yet set a premiere date for Watergate, but you can read more details below:

May 23, 2017 – HISTORY(R) has commissioned the definitive original documentary series about one of the biggest criminal conspiracies in modern politics, “Watergate,” produced and directed by Academy Award(R)-winning director Charles Ferguson (“Inside Job”).

“The Watergate investigation transfixed America and the entire world for two years. Forty-five years later, this epic story continues to fascinate,” said Paul Buccieri, President, A+E Studios and A+E Networks Portfolio Group, parent company of HISTORY. “From the corrupt politicians to the tenacious special prosecutors, judges, and journalists, the scandal is replete with heroes and villains alike. We are thrilled to partner with Charles to bring a fresh perspective on this complex story whose repercussions are still felt today.”

“History has given me an extraordinary opportunity to explore, and tell, a hugely entertaining but also deeply important story that once transfixed America and the world for two years, but which most younger Americans have never seen before. Hugely compelling, Watergate is at once a sobering, frightening demonstration of the fragility of democracy in the face of the abuse of power, and yet at the same time an inspiring demonstration of how courageous people, many of them young, used America’s institutions to prove that everyone, even the President of the United States, must obey the law,” said Ferguson.

On the night of June 17, 1972, a security guard in the Watergate office complex in Washington, DC called the police when he found a door repeatedly taped open. The police discovered five men dressed in business suits who were in the process of installing bugs and photographing documents in the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee. Thus began the most explosive scandal in American history – a scandal that brought down the Presidency of Richard M. Nixon and sent over 40 people to jail.

The events of Watergate read like a political thriller – dirty tricks, government surveillance, and sabotage … much of it secretly caught on tape. “Watergate” tells the full story of the conspiracy led by Nixon and his White House staff, and how they were brought to justice. Among the incidents covered in the series is the leaking and publication of the Pentagon Papers the spreading of false news on behalf of the White House to destroy the candidacy of Senator Edmund Muskie, then the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1972 the revelation that Nixon secretly tape-recorded every conversation in the Oval Office the Supreme Court fight for the tapes following subpoenas by the special prosecutor and both houses of Congress the infamous Saturday Night Massacre, when Nixon fired special prosecutor Archibald Cox, leading to the resignations of Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment proceedings and the final “smoking gun” tape which recorded Nixon conspiring to cover up White House involvement in Watergate just days after the burglary.

It is a story that touches on Vietnam, the unrest of the 1960s, a near World War, the opening of China, and the moment when an unlikely group of heroes from both political parties band together and bring down the White House.

Much of our current political climate began with Watergate, a word everyone has heard, but a story few Americans now understand.

The series will include new interviews with journalists, senior Nixon Administration officials, members of Congress, and prosecutors. This material will be combined with existing archival material including the taped conversations recorded by Nixon and other members of his administration, footage from Congressional hearings, interviews conducted during the investigation, transcripts from criminal trials and Supreme Court arguments other legal proceedings, and written first-person accounts from people involved in the scandal.

Augmenting the archival material is newly sourced information from the Nixon White House tapes. Nuance Communications, a leading voice recognition, language processing and AI firm, is performing, for the first time, advanced computer analysis of the tapes which is expected to reveal previously unknown information.

Charles Ferguson directed the Academy Award-winning film, “Inside Job,” and the Academy Award-nominated film, “No End in Sight.”

“Watergate” is produced by Representational Pictures for HISTORY. Charles Ferguson is Director and Producer. Krista Parris is Producer. Jana Bennett is Executive Producer. Molly Thompson and Michael Stiller are Executive Producers for HISTORY.”

What do you think? Are you interested in the Watergate scandal? Will you watch the new History documentary?


Review: ‘Watergate’ Shocks Anew With Its True Tale of Political Scandal

The word “bombshell” pops up a lot in “Watergate,” Charles Ferguson’s comprehensive documentary about … well, you know. From the summer of 1972, when five men were arrested breaking into the offices of the Democratic National Committee in Washington, until President Richard M. Nixon’s resignation two years later, the public was confronted with a barrage of shocking revelations. The morning papers and the evening news brought fresh reports of wrongdoing at the highest levels of government, unearthed by congressional committees, a federal grand jury and the diggings of journalists. Before the nation’s eyes, a “third-rate burglary” blossomed into a constitutional crisis.

Ferguson has given his film the subtitle “How We Learned to Stop an Out-of-Control President.” In case the implications of the lesson weren’t clear, he ends with George Santayana’s well-worn aphorism about those who don’t study the past being doomed to repeat it. Whether we are living through a sequel to Watergate — or whether out-of-control presidents after Nixon might have learned to get away with their own crimes — is in some ways an idle question. History rarely repeats itself exactly. The lessons of “Watergate” have to do with the fragility and resilience of democratic institutions, and with the stark ethical challenges that sometimes arise in political life.

Serious stuff. But the movie — more than four hours long, split into two parts with a cliffhanger in the middle — also works, perhaps unexpectedly, as escapist entertainment. Like many of my fellow citizens, I spend a lot of time thinking about the current president, whether I want to or not. He’s ubiquitous on television, in social media, and as a topic of dinner-party discourse and water-cooler hobnobbing. For the entirety of “Watergate,” however, I didn’t think about Donald J. Trump at all. I thought about Richard Nixon instead, which while not exactly pleasant was at least different.

Ferguson’s narrative is so dense and complicated, and at the same time so dramatic, suspenseful and clear, that it absorbs all of your attention. You probably know the outcome, and if you’re a history-nerd child of the ’70s like me, you’re probably familiar with many of the names and details. Haldeman. Ehrlichman. Kalmbach. Segretti. Sam Ervin. The Saturday Night Massacre. “I am not a crook.” It’s like a classic rock station on satellite radio. (The movie also has some fine musical cues of its own.)

Or maybe a deluxe remastered edition of an album you’ve left sitting in the back of a milk crate. Almost literally: Ferguson makes ingenious use of the tapes that play such a large role in Watergate lore. He films re-enactments that are more like staged readings, in which actors playing Nixon (Douglas Hodge) and members of his staff reproduce conversations captured by a hidden audio recorder. The point is not to embellish the record but to clarify it.


History Orders Documentary Series ‘Watergate’

HISTORY® has commissioned the definitive original documentary series about one of the biggest criminal conspiracies in modern politics, “Watergate,” produced and directed by Academy Award®-winning director Charles Ferguson (“Inside Job”).

“The Watergate investigation transfixed America and the entire world for two years. Forty-five years later, this epic story continues to fascinate,” said Paul Buccieri, President, A+E Studios and A+E Networks Portfolio Group, parent company of HISTORY. “From the corrupt politicians to the tenacious special prosecutors, judges, and journalists, the scandal is replete with heroes and villains alike. We are thrilled to partner with Charles to bring a fresh perspective on this complex story whose repercussions are still felt today.”

“History has given me an extraordinary opportunity to explore, and tell, a hugely entertaining but also deeply important story that once transfixed America and the world for two years, but which most younger Americans have never seen before. Hugely compelling, Watergate is at once a sobering, frightening demonstration of the fragility of democracy in the face of the abuse of power, and yet at the same time an inspiring demonstration of how courageous people, many of them young, used America’s institutions to prove that everyone, even the President of the United States, must obey the law,” said Ferguson.

On the night of June 17, 1972, a security guard in the Watergate office complex in Washington, DC called the police when he found a door repeatedly taped open. The police discovered five men dressed in business suits who were in the process of installing bugs and photographing documents in the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee. Thus began the most explosive scandal in American history – a scandal that brought down the Presidency of Richard M. Nixon and sent over 40 people to jail.

The events of Watergate read like a political thriller – dirty tricks, government surveillance, and sabotage … much of it secretly caught on tape. “Watergate” tells the full story of the conspiracy led by Nixon and his White House staff, and how they were brought to justice. Among the incidents covered in the series is the leaking and publication of the Pentagon Papers the spreading of false news on behalf of the White House to destroy the candidacy of Senator Edmund Muskie, then the front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1972 the revelation that Nixon secretly tape-recorded every conversation in the Oval Office the Supreme Court fight for the tapes following subpoenas by the special prosecutor and both houses of Congress the infamous Saturday Night Massacre, when Nixon fired special prosecutor Archibald Cox, leading to the resignations of Attorney General Elliot Richardson and Deputy Attorney General William Ruckelshaus the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment proceedings and the final “smoking gun” tape which recorded Nixon conspiring to cover up White House involvement in Watergate just days after the burglary.

It is a story that touches on Vietnam, the unrest of the 1960s, a near World War, the opening of China, and the moment when an unlikely group of heroes from both political parties band together and bring down the White House.

Much of our current political climate began with Watergate, a word everyone has heard, but a story few Americans now understand.

The series will include new interviews with journalists, senior Nixon Administration officials, members of Congress, and prosecutors. This material will be combined with existing archival material including the taped conversations recorded by Nixon and other members of his administration, footage from Congressional hearings, interviews conducted during the investigation, transcripts from criminal trials and Supreme Court arguments other legal proceedings, and written first-person accounts from people involved in the scandal.

Augmenting the archival material is newly sourced information from the Nixon White House tapes. Nuance Communications, a leading voice recognition, language processing and AI firm, is performing, for the first time, advanced computer analysis of the tapes which is expected to reveal previously unknown information.


Contents

The movie starts on April 11, 1972. Nixon's advisers at the White House ask Mark Felt how to ask J. Edgar Hoover to step aside as the FBI director. Some days later, Hoover dies. Pat Gray becomes the acting FBI director. In June 1972, several ex-CIA and FBI agents burglarize Watergate hotel to bug the DNC headquarters.

Members of the Weather Underground bomb the Pentagon.

Attorney General Richard Kleindienst announces that the Watergate investigation has concluded without the White House or CREEP (Nixon's re-election committee) being implicated.

Pat Gray's Senate confirmation hearings gets derailed when it comes to light that he was sending the FBI investigative files to the White House.

A side story of the movie revolves around Mark Felt tracking and locating his runaway hippie daughter in a commune.

    as Mark Felt, the FBI agent and Deputy Director who became "Deep Throat", the anonymous whistleblower who helped expose the Watergate scandal. as Audrey Felt, Mark's brilliant and troubled wife who shares the burden of Mark's dangerous dilemma about Watergate. as Ed Miller, An FBI Intel chief as Joan Felt, Mark and Audrey's daughter as Pat Miller, Ed's wife as Charlie Bates, an FBI agent and Felt lieutenant who suspects that Felt is leaking classified information on the Watergate investigation. as John Dean, the Nixon White House counsel and architect of the Watergate cover-up who was desperate to stop the Washington Post leaks. as Pat Gray, FBI Acting Director and one of Felt's rivals who then had to withdraw his nomination after destroying Watergate evidence. as Bill Sullivan, one of Felt's rivals at the FBI as Bob Woodward, the Washington Post reporter who teamed with Carl Bernstein to expose the Watergate dealings. as Carol Tschudy, Felt's secretary as Angelo Lano, the head of the investigation as Sandy Smith, Time magazine reporter as Robert Kunkel, an FBI special agent as Stan Pottinger, who prosecuted Felt and other FBI officials for ordering break-ins to search homes of suspected domestic terrorist radicals, without warrants. as Agency Man
  • Richard Molina as US Marshal

An untitled project about FBI agent Mark Felt, known as Deep Throat, who was an informant for reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, was announced on January 24, 2006, written by Peter Landesman. The film was to be directed by Jay Roach for Universal Pictures and Playtone, and Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman were attached as producers. [5] On November 3, 2015, it was announced that Landesman would himself direct the film, which had been titled Felt. [6] Liam Neeson was cast in the title role. [6] MadRiver Pictures financed the film and also produced it, along with Scott Free Productions, Playtone, and Cara Films, and producers Ridley Scott, Goetzman, Hanks, Giannina Scott, Marc Butan, Christopher Woodrow, Roach, and Landesman. [6] On November 5, 2015, Diane Lane was cast to play Felt's brilliant and troubled wife, Audrey, who shares the burden of Felt's dangerous dilemma about the White House's Watergate scandal. [7] On November 6, 2015, Jason Bateman joined the film to play an FBI agent and Felt lieutenant, Charlie Bates, who suspects that Felt is leaking classified information on the Watergate investigation. [8] On December 9, 2015, Maika Monroe also joined the cast, as Felt's daughter Joan. [9]

On April 29, 2016, a complete cast was announced Tony Goldwyn as FBI intel chief Ed Miller Kate Walsh as Miller's wife, Pat Josh Lucas as Charlie Bates, replacing Bateman Michael C. Hall as John Dean Marton Csokas and Tom Sizemore as Felt's rivals at the FBI, Pat Gray and Bill Sullivan, respectively Wendi McLendon-Covey as Felt's secretary, Carol Tschudy Ike Barinholtz as head of the Watergate investigation, Angelo Lano Bruce Greenwood as Time magazine reporter Sandy Smith Brian d'Arcy James as FBI special agent Robert Kunkel Noah Wyle as Stan Pottinger and Colm Meaney and Eddie Marsan as CIA agents, though Meaney did not appear in the finished film. [10] Felt's real-life grandson Will Felt also appears in a background cameo as a CIA agent, and Daniel Pemberton composed the film's score. [11]

Principal photography on the film began on May 2, 2016, in Atlanta. [12] [13] Locations included the Virginia–Highland neighborhood, Cobb Galleria and North Druid Hills. [14]

Cinematographer Adam Kimmel shot the film with Arri Alexa XT cameras. It was his first time using digital cameras to shoot a feature film. This was also the first film to be shot with Cooke Anamorphic/i SF (Special Flair) anamorphic lenses, which feature a special coating on the standard Anamorphic/i lenses that increase flare, bokeh and other aberrations inherent in anamorphic. Kimmel thought these lenses helped him find a balance between a 1970s period look and a "more accessible" modern one. Because Kimmel and Landesman didn't think the 2.40:1 anamorphic aspect ratio was right for the film, it was cropped on the sides to a 2:1 ratio. [15]

Much of Diane Lane's performance was cut due to running time constraints. At a press conference, Landesman and Liam Neeson both championed Lane's performance, saying how devastated they all were (especially Lane herself) that so much of her work was not in the finished film. There were hints that the scenes may be included as "deleted scenes" or as part of an "extended cut" on the home video release of the film. [16]

In May 2017, Sony Pictures Classics acquired U.S. distribution rights to the film, which had been retitled The Silent Man. [17] Under the title Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House, it premiered as part of the Special Presentations section of the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 8, [18] and was theatrically released in the United States on September 29, 2017.

Critical response Edit

On review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, the film holds an approval rating of 35% based on 113 reviews, with an average rating of 5.39/10. The website's critics consensus reads: "Mark Felt may dramatize the man behind Deep Throat, but its stodgy treatment of history offers little insight into the famous whistleblower." [19] On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average score of 49 out of 100, based on 29 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews". [20]

Mike Ryan of Uproxx gave the film a generally positive review, praising Neeson while criticizing the script and writing, "Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House (please get a new title) does its job of presenting who Mark Felt was and what a burden it was for him personally to betray his beloved FBI. And if you want to know more about Felt (or, maybe, you just like Liam Neeson), then Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House does its job. But, I’d recommend anyone palette cleanse after by watching All the President’s Men." [21]


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About the Show

You think you know the story, or maybe you don’t. But Watergate was stranger, wilder, and more exciting than you can imagine. What did it feel like to live through the scandal that brought down President Nixon? Find out on this eight-episode podcast miniseries hosted by Leon Neyfakh. Made possible by Slate Plus members.

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Leon Neyfakh, a former Slate staff writer, is the host of the podcast Fiasco.

Martha

Our eight-episode miniseries launches with the story of a woman who knew too much.


Episodes

Series premiere. President Richard Nixon is reelected in 1972, but attacks from the media and the antiwar movement goad him to take the dark path to the Watergate burglary.

The arrests lead to a cover-up, but it starts to unravel after Nixon's landslide re-election.

As the cover-up cracks, White House counsel John Dean turns on Nixon, a Senate committee is formed and a special prosecutor is appointed.

The Senate Watergate Committee and the Watergate Special Prosecutor confront Nixon in a deepening Constitutional crisis.

The Saturday Night Massacre prompts impeachment proceedings and a Supreme Court confrontation.

Impeachment votes, Supreme Court rulings and further revelations seal Richard Nixon's fate.


Watch the video: Nixon with no expletives deleted (December 2021).