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Jamaica CVE-43 - History

Jamaica CVE-43 - History

Jamaica

A bay on the southwestern coast of Long Island, N.Y.

(CVE-43: dp. 7,800; 1. 495'8"; b. 69'6"; ew. 111'6"; dr. 26'; s. 18 k.; cpl. 890; a. 2 5", 20 40mm.; cl. Bogue)

Jamaica (CVE-43), originally ACV-43, was launched under Maritime Commission contract by Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp. (later Todd-Pacific), Tacoma, Wash., 21 April 1943; sponsored by Mrs. C. T. Simard; reclassified CVE-43 on 15 July 1943; acquired by the Navy, and transferred to Great Britain under lend-lease 27 September 1943.

One of a large group of escort carriers transferred to the Royal Navy for antisubmarine work in the Atlantic, Jamaica was renamed Shah. She took an active part in the war, heading the hunter-killer group which sank U-198 in the Indian Ocean 12 August 1944, and taking part in the Burma campaign in 1945. She was returned to the United States 6 December 1945, and sold 20 June 1947.


Jamaican History

Understanding our history means understanding why Jamaicans are as resilient and laid-back as we’re known to be. We are a diverse nation because of our past and continue to be a multicultural melting pot offering experiences dipped in unique blends of traditions preserved from centuries ago.

Indegenous People of Jamaica

Our documented history begins when Christopher Columbus first came to Jamaica in May of 1494. He was thoroughly impressed with what he saw as noted in his logs “the fairest island that eyes have beheld: mountains and the land seem to touch the sky … all full of valleys and fields and plains.”

He later brought other Spanish settlers who colonized the land and forced the Tainos, American-Indian people who had already occupied the land, into unpaid labor. The Tainos were a gente people who named the island “Xaymaca,” meaning “land of wood and water.” The words “hurricane,” “tobacco,” and �rbecue” were also derived from their language. Konoko Falls is home to an extensive museum dedicated to the Tainos. 

Eventually, the Taino population perished completely due to a combination of forced labor as well as the diseases the Spanish brought with them, like the common cold, for which the Tainos had no immunity.

The Spanish established the city we now know as Ocho Rios where explorations continue in an effort to unearth Columbus’ ships beached somewhere in this region.

The History of Jamaica

The Spanish were the first to bring sugarcane and slavery to the island. They ruled the land for a century and a half until they were defeated by the English in 1655. Slavery and sugar cultivation became Jamaica’s main trade, making the English planters incredibly wealthy. 

Buccaneers soon operated out of Jamaica, attacking the treasure ships of Spain and France. One was a young indentured laborer from Wales named Henry Morgan. He would prosper and rise to Lieutenant Governor. His home base, Port Royal, was known as the “richest and wickedest city in Christendom.” However, in 1692, an earthquake destroyed Port Royal, pushing it below the sea.

What’s left of Port Royal today stands proudly as a relic of its colored past. A visit to the naval base and the museum there, followed by a fresh seafood meal at an outdoor seaside restaurant, makes for a memorable cultural outing.

The Maroons

When the English arrived, the Spaniards fled to the neighboring islands. Their slaves escaped into the mountains and formed their own independent groups, called Maroons. The Maroons were in time joined by other slaves who escaped from the English. 

For a long time, they fought against the English who sought to re-enslave them. So successful were the Maroons, fighting from their fortresses, that the English were forced to sign peace treaties granting the Maroons self-government and ceding to them the mountain lands that they inhabited.

The runaways periodically staged rebellions until the treaty in 1739 that gave them a measure of local autonomy that they still retain today. Every year on January 6, the Maroons celebrate the signing of this treaty and visitors are welcomed to partake in the lively song and dance within the sacred lands.

Abolishment of Slavery

Slavery was abolished in 1834. In the economic chaos that followed emancipation, one event stood out: the Morant Bay Rebellion of 1865. The uprising was led by a black Baptist deacon named Paul Bogle and was supported by a wealthy Kingston businessman, George William Gordon. Both were executed and are now among Jamaica’s national heroes. Monuments to all Jamaican heroes can be viewed in the National Heroes Park in Kingston where the Jamaica Defence Force performs an entertaining Changing of the Guards ceremony each day at noon. 

In the years that followed, much of modern Jamaica was forged. Migrants from India and China came as indentured workers for sugar estates and rapidly moved to other occupations. Soon Jewish settlers came to Jamaica, followed by migrant traders from the Middle East. All together these groups created the diverse people of Jamaica today, to which we owe the national motto “Out of Many, One People.’


ร.ล. ชาห์ (D21)

ยูเอส จาเมกา (CVE-43) ( แต่เดิม AVG-43 จากนั้นก็ ACV-43 ) เป็น ผู้ให้บริการคุ้มกัน ของ สงครามโลกครั้งที่สอง ที่ทำหน้าที่ในอังกฤษ กองทัพเรือ เป็น ชาห์ (D21) กลับไปยังประเทศสหรัฐอเมริกาในตอนท้ายของสงครามเธอถูกดัดแปลงเป็นพ่อค้าเรือและเธอถูกขายไปให้บริการพลเรือนในปี 1946 ขณะที่ ซัลตา ในที่สุดเธอก็ถูก ทิ้ง ในปี 2509

    ผู้ให้บริการคุ้มกัน (US) ให้บริการคุ้มกันชั้นผู้ปกครอง (สหราชอาณาจักร)
  • ปืน ต่อต้านอากาศยานเอนกประสงค์ 2 × 4 นิ้ว ในแท่นเดี่ยว
  • ปืนโบฟอร์สขนาด 16 × 40 มม. ในแท่นคู่ mount
  • 20 × ปืนใหญ่ Oerlikon 20 มม. เดี่ยว 20 มม. ในเมาท์เดี่ยวและคู่

ชาห์ เป็น ไม้บรรทัด -class ผู้ให้บริการคุ้มกัน ใน กองทัพเรือ เรือในชั้นนี้ทั้งหมดมีขนาดใหญ่กว่าและมีความจุของเครื่องบินมากกว่าเรือบรรทุกคุ้มกันที่สร้างโดยอเมริกาทุกลำ ลำเรือของพวกเขาได้รับการออกแบบให้เป็น เรือเดินสมุทร แต่ถูก วาง ให้เป็นเรือคุ้มกันและไม่ได้ดัดแปลงในภายหลัง ทั้งหมดมี ส่วนประกอบ ของ 646 เจ้าหน้าที่ตำรวจและ การจัดอันดับ และ ความยาวโดยรวม ของ 492 ฟุต 3 นิ้ว (150.0 ม.) ซึ่งเป็น คาน 69 ฟุต 6 นิ้ว (21.2 เมตร) และ ร่าง ของ 25 ฟุต 6 (7.8 เมตร) [1] แรงขับให้ กังหันไอน้ำ สองหม้อไอน้ำที่เชื่อมต่อกับหนึ่ง เพลา ให้ 9,350 เบรคแรงม้า (6,970 กิโลวัตต์) ซึ่งสามารถขับเคลื่อนเรือที่ 16.5 นอต (30.6 กิโลเมตร / เอช 19.0 ไมล์ต่อชั่วโมง) [2]

สิ่งอำนวยความสะดวกเครื่องบินเป็นสะพานควบคุมการบินขนาดเล็กรวมกันบน ทางกราบขวา ด้านรถกระเช้าอากาศยานสอง 43 34 ฟุต (13.1 เมตร× 10.4 ม.) หนึ่ง อากาศยานหนังสติ๊ก เก้า arrestor สายไฟ [1] เครื่องบินสามารถเก็บไว้ในโรงเก็บเครื่องบินขนาด 260 x 62 ฟุต (79.2 ม. × 18.9 ม.) ใต้ดาดฟ้าบินได้ [1] อาวุธยุทโธปกรณ์ประกอบด้วย: ปืน สองวัตถุประสงค์ ขนาด 4 นิ้ว สอง กระบอกในแท่นเดี่ยว, ปืน ต่อต้านอากาศยาน Bofors ขนาด 40 มม. สิบหก กระบอก ในแท่นคู่ และ ปืนใหญ่ต่อต้านอากาศยาน Oerlikon 20 มม. จำนวน 20 มม. ในแท่นเดี่ยว [1] เติมเต็มการดำเนินงานของเธอของเครื่องบินดำเนินการเปลี่ยนแปลงอยู่ตลอดเวลามักจะเป็นบางกลุ่มได้ถึงประมาณ 18 กรัมแมนเวนเจอร์ส , Grumman ปัก , Grumman Hellcats และ มารีวอลรัส บวกขนส่งสินค้าดาดฟ้า [3]

MC ฮัลล์ 254 ถูกวางลง 13 พฤศจิกายน 1942 และ เปิดตัว เป็น จาเมกา สัญญากับ สำนักงานคณะกรรมการกำกับการเดินเรือ โดย Seattle-Tacoma วิชาการ [4] ที่ Tacoma วอชิงตัน เมื่อวันที่ 21 เมษายน 1943 ได้รับการสนับสนุนโดยนางมาร์ดส์ เธอได้รับการจัดประเภทรายการใหม่ CVE-43 เมื่อวันที่ 15 กรกฎาคม 1943 และได้มาโดย กองทัพเรือสหรัฐฯ

เธอได้รับการถ่ายโอนไปยัง สหราชอาณาจักร อยู่ภายใต้การ ให้ยืมเช่า , การว่าจ้าง ที่ 27 กันยายน 1943 เป็นหนึ่งในกลุ่มใหญ่ของสายการบินที่เหมาะสมสำหรับการ ต่อต้านเรือดำน้ำ ทำงานถ่ายโอนไปยังกองทัพเรือในมหาสมุทรแปซิฟิก

จาเมกา ถูกเปลี่ยนชื่อเป็น Shah โดยมี หมายเลขธง RN เป็น D21 ได้รับคำสั่งจาก วิลเลี่ยมจอห์น Yendell , [5] เธอเติมเต็มอากาศเริ่มต้น 851 นาวิกโยธินฝูงบิน 12 กรัมแมนล้างแค้นครั้งที่สอง ทิ้งระเบิดตอร์ปิโด และการบินของ Grumman เดาสุ่ม สู้ [3]

หลังจาก การทดสอบในทะเล เธอได้รับการแก้ไขในแคนาดาเพื่อ ป้องกัน ขบวน ซึ่งเสร็จสิ้นเมื่อสิ้นปี เธอเดินทางจาก แวนคูเวอร์ ไป ซานฟรานซิสโก เพื่อเสริมเครื่องบินปฏิบัติการ 12 Grumman Avengers และเที่ยวบินของ Grumman Wildcats อย่างไรก็ตามยังไม่มีการบินเป็นไปได้ที่เป็นชั้นของเธอยังเต็มไปด้วย Curtiss P-40s ที่จะพายเรือไป ตะเภา จากซานฟรานซิเธอแล่นเรือไปยัง วิลเลียมส์ , เมลเบิร์น , ออสเตรเลีย หลังจาก resupplying เธออย่างต่อเนื่องในการกำหนดค่านี้ตะเภาและ โคลัมโบ

หน้าที่ของเธอส่วนใหญ่ขบวนป้องกันและการค้าการป้องกันเยอรมัน U-เรือ ปฏิบัติการใน มหาสมุทรอินเดีย ที่มีฐานฝั่ง มะลี เธอเข้าร่วมในสงคราม โดยมุ่งหน้าไปยังกลุ่มนักล่า-นักฆ่า ซึ่งจม U-198 ในมหาสมุทรอินเดียเมื่อวันที่ 12 สิงหาคม ค.ศ. 1944 เวนเจอร์สของ 851 ได้แจ้งการมีอยู่ของเรือดำน้ำในพื้นที่นั้น เวนเจอร์สได้ค้นพบเรือดำน้ำและพยายามโจมตีเธอ และกำกับการแสดงเรือลำอื่น ๆ ในกลุ่ม ร Begum ที่ แม่น้ำชั้น เรือรบ ร Findhorn และ Black Swan -class ลำ ทำปฏิกิริยา โกดาวารี ไปยังจุดที่เรือดำน้ำเป็น ความลึกของการเรียกเก็บเงิน ที่เกิดขึ้นในมันจม

ชาห์ ถูกย้ายไปยัง กองเรืออินเดียตะวันออก และปรับแต่งใหม่ใน เมืองเดอร์บัน ก่อนเข้าร่วมการ รณรงค์ ใน พม่า ในปี พ.ศ. 2488 หลังจากประสบความสูญเสียจากเครื่องบินหลายครั้งจากการลาดตระเวนและอุบัติเหตุการลงจอด ส่วนเสริมของเธอได้รับการปรับปรุงในช่วงเวลานี้โดยเที่ยวบินของ Grumman Hellcats ในช่วงเดือนเมษายนและพฤษภาคม 1945 เธอเข้าร่วมใน การดำเนินงานบิชอป เปิดตัวลาดตระเวนและการนัดหยุดงานกับ นิโคบาร์ เพื่อเตรียมการรุกรานของ กรุงย่างกุ้ง [3] ไม่นานหลังจากนั้นเธอได้รับมอบหมายกับการค้นหาเรือลาดตระเวนญี่ปุ่น ฮา ปัญหาทางกลไกของ หนังสติ๊ก ส่งผลให้เวนเจอร์สของ 851 ส่วนใหญ่ถูกส่งไปยัง HMS Emperor เพื่อแลกกับ Hellcats จากฝูงบิน 800 และ 804 อุบัติเหตุร้ายแรงจากการลงจอดโดยหนึ่งใน Hellcats เหล่านั้นทำให้ Shah ออก จากปฏิบัติการได้ อย่างมีประสิทธิภาพ เมื่อวันที่ 11 พฤษภาคม อย่างไรก็ตามเวนเจอร์ส 851 บินจาก จักรพรรดิ ก็สามารถที่จะค้นหาและสร้างความเสียหาย ฮา ก่อนที่จะเธอจมโดยเรือพิฆาต 26 กองเรือใน การดำเนินงาน Dukedom

Hellcats ที่รอดชีวิตจากอุบัติเหตุการลงจอดก่อนหน้านี้ได้บินออกจาก Shah และเธอกลับมาที่ Ceylon และ Bombay เป็น เวลาสั้น ๆ เพื่อ ปรับแต่งและฝึกอบรม การจัดเก็บภาษีที่รอดตายจากเวนเจอร์ส 851 และ 845 ของกองบวก Hellcats และวอลรัสสำหรับการสนับสนุนและการกู้คืนระหว่างการดำเนินการเชื่อมโยงไปถึงในเดือนสิงหาคมที่เธอเดินทางไปเข้าร่วม การดำเนินงานซิป บนชายฝั่งมาเลย์เท่านั้นที่จะลุกขึ้นยืนบนเส้นทางเมื่อ ญี่ปุ่นยอมจำนน

ลงจากเครื่องบินที่ Trincomalee เมื่อวันที่ 26 สิงหาคม จากนั้นเธอก็แล่นไปยัง ฐานทัพเรือ Clyde ผ่าน Aden และ คลองสุเอซ ซึ่งเธอเตรียมพร้อมสำหรับการเดินทางกลับสหรัฐอเมริกา เมื่อมาถึง นอร์ฟอล์ก เมื่อวันที่ 16 ตุลาคม เธอถูกส่งตัวไปยังสหรัฐอเมริกาอย่างเป็นทางการในวันที่ 26 พฤศจิกายน พ.ศ. 2488 [3]

เธอถูกขายเป็นพ่อค้าบริการให้กับอาร์เจนตินาเมื่อวันที่ 20 มิถุนายน พ.ศ. 2490 ในชื่อ ซัลตา ซึ่งตั้งชื่อตาม เมืองอาร์เจนติ น่า Newport News อู่ต่อเรือ ดำเนินการแปลง

ในปีพ.ศ. 2506 เธอเป็นเรือลำแรกที่เข้าช่วยเหลือผู้โดยสารและลูกเรือจากเรือเดินสมุทรลาโค เนีย ของกรีก เมื่อถูกไฟไหม้ในมหาสมุทรแอตแลนติก ในเวลาที่เธออยู่ภายใต้คำสั่งของ กัปตัน José Barrere ในทางของมันมาจาก เจนัว , อิตาลี, การ บัวโนสไอเรส ซัลตา รับการช่วยเหลือ 475 คนและเอาเรือส่วนใหญ่ของ Lakonia ' s เรือชูชีพ ซัลตา ถูก ทิ้งร้าง ในบัวโนสไอเรสในปี 1966

  1. ^ abcd Cocker (2008), p.82.
  2. ^ ค็อกเกอร์ (2008), หน้า 79.
  3. abcdA History of HMS Shah , Royal Navy Research Archive
  4. ^ Seattle-Tacoma วิชาการเป็นที่รู้จักกันต่อมาเป็น ทอดด์แปซิฟิก
  5. ^Yendell วิลเลี่ยมจอห์น (1903-1988), พลเรือตรี
  • ค็อกเกอร์, มอริซ (2008) เครื่องบินแบกเรือของกองทัพเรือ Stroud, Gloucestershire: สำนักพิมพ์ประวัติศาสตร์ ISBN 978-0-7524-4633-2 .
  • โดย Lt Cdr Geoffrey B Mason RN (Rtd) (2006) "HMS SHAH (D 21) - เรือบรรทุกเครื่องบินคุ้มกันชั้นผู้ปกครอง" . ประวัติบริการของเรือรบกองทัพเรือในสงครามโลกครั้งที่ 2 naval-history.net.

บทความนี้จะรวมข้อความจาก สาธารณ พจนานุกรมของนาวิกโยธินอเมริกันปเรือ


HMS Shah (D21)

HMS Shah (D21), nguyên là tàu sân bay hộ tống USS Jamaica (CVE-43) (ký hiệu lườn ban đầu AVG-43 và sau đó là ACV-43) của Hải quân Hoa Kỳ thuộc lớp Bogue, được chuyển cho Hải quân Hoàng gia Anh Quốc và đã hoạt động trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai.

Jamaica được đặt lườn theo một hợp đồng với Ủy ban Hàng hải Hoa Kỳ với số hiệu lườn MC 254 vào ngày 13 tháng 11 năm 1942 tại xưởng đóng tàu của hãng Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding ở Tacoma, Washington nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 21 tháng 4 năm 1943, được đỡ đầu bởi Bà C. T. Simard, và được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu lườn CVE-43 vào ngày 15 tháng 7 năm 1943. Nó được chuyển cho Anh Quốc vào ngày 27 tháng 9 năm 1943 theo chương trình Cho thuê-cho mượn, và được đổi tên thành HMS Shah (D21), và đã hoạt động trong chiến tranh như một chiếc thuộc lớp Ameer.

Dưới quyền chỉ huy của Chuẩn Đô đốc tương lai William John Yendell, Ώ] Shah phục vụ trong vai trò chống tàu ngầm tại Đại Tây Dương lực lượng máy bay phối thuộc thường xuyên của nó bao gồm 12 máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi Grumman Avenger II và một tốp máy bay tiêm kích Wildcat thuộc Phi đội 851 Không lực Hải quân Hoàng gia. Nó đã hoạt động tích cực trong cuộc chiến, dẫn đầu đội đặc nhiệm tìm-diệt vốn đã đánh chìm tàu ngầm Đức U-198 tại Ấn Độ Dương vào ngày 12 tháng 8 năm 1944, cũng như tham gia chiến dịch Miến Điện năm 1945, phát hiện ra chiếc tàu tuần dương Nhật Haguro vốn bị đánh chìm trong "Chiến dịch Dukedom".

Sau chiến tranh, nó được hoàn trả cho Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 6 tháng 12 năm 1945, rồi được bán để hoạt động hàng hải thương mại tư nhân vào ngày 20 tháng 6 năm 1947 dưới tên gọi Salta. Vào năm 1963 nó tham gia vào việc tiếp cứu chiếc Lakonia. Nó được tháo dỡ tại Buenos Aires vào năm 1966.


Notes

  1. 12 McCluskie, Tom (2013). The Rise and Fall of Harland and Wolff. Stroud: The History Press. p.   146. ISBN   978-0752488615 .
  2. Lloyd's Register of Shipping (PDF) . London: Lloyd's Register. 1939 . Retrieved 8 October 2020 .
  3. ↑"HMS Pretoria Castle Gun 10 X BR 20mm 70cal Mark V VC Power Twin". NavHist. Flixco Pty Limited . Retrieved 8 October 2020 .
  4. ↑ Mason, Geoffrey B. "HMS Pretoria Castle (F 61) – Escort Aircraft Carrier". Service Histories of Royal Navy Warships in World War 2. Naval History . Retrieved 27 February 2016 .

Jamaica CVE-43 - History


Long Island/HMS Archer class escort aircraft carriers
Displacement: 16,620 tons design full load (12,860 tons in RN service)
Dimensions: 465 x 69.5 x 25.75 feet/141.7 x 21.2 x 7.8 meters
Extreme Dimensions: 492 x 102 x 25.75 feet/150 x 31 x 7.8 meters
Propulsion: 4 7-cylinder Busch-Sulzer diesels, 1 shaft, 8,500 hp, 17.5 knots
Crew: 408 (555 in RN service)
Armor: none
Armament: 1 single 4/50 DP, 2 single 3/50 AA, 4 .50 cal MG (3 4/50 DP, 15 20 mm AA in RN service)
Aircraft: 16

Concept/Program: The escort carrier program was seen as a quick way to produce a large number of auxiliary carriers, ships which could be employed in varying roles as requirements dictated. Merchant hulls were used, and conversions were designed in the interests of speed, not operating characteristics. It was intended that these ships would serve primarily as transport, training and ASW carriers, but in service they saw many additional roles. These were the first escort carrier conversions. They were converted from completed merchant C3 freighters. Both were ordered for USN service, but Archer transferred to RN.

Class: Archer was not officially given a US class name.

Design/Conversion: Conversion was very spartan, consisting of a lightweight wooden flight deck on a trusswork superstructure covering 70% of the ships' length a small enclosed hangar was fitted beneath the flight deck aft. A navigating bridge was located under the forward edge of the flight deck, which stopped well short of the forecastle. There was no island.

Variations: Archer was outfitted to RN standards.

Modifications: Both ship later had their flight decks extended, with small navigation positions built on either side of the flight deck.

Classification: Archer classified as BAVG. Long Island classified as AVG, ACV and CVE in sequence.

Operational: Saw relatively little service as operational carriers. Most service was as aircraft transports.

Departure from Service/Disposal: Deemed obsolete and quickly discarded postwar both sold into merchant service and re-converted.

DANFS History

Built by Sun Shipbuilding. Laid down 7 Jul 1939, launched 11 Jan 1940, completed as merchant Mormacmail . Acquired by USN 6 March 1941, converted by Newport News, commissioned 2 June 1941.

Flight deck lengthened at Mare Island Navy Yard 9/1941. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Used as aircraft ferry and training ship during WWII. .50 cal MG were replaced by 20 single 20 mm AA.

Decommissioned 26 March 1946, stricken for disposal 12 April 1946. Sold for scrapping 24 April 1947, but resold 12 March 1948 and converted for merchant service as Nelly . Became schoolship Seven Seas 1953 hulked at Rotterdam as a floating dormitory in 1966. Scrapped 1977 in Belgium.

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No name assigned
Lend-Lease as HMS Archer (D78)
ex merchant Mormacland
BAVG 1
Photos: [HMS Archer ]


Built by Sun Shipbuilding. Laid down . launched 14 Dec 1939, completed 4/1940 as merchant Mormacland . Acquired by USN 20 March 1941, converted at Newport News, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Archer (D78) 17 Nov 1941.

The 4 inch guns were replaced with British weapons in 1942 2 dual 40 mm added and 1 20 mm removed 2-3/1943. Used in ASW and escort service. This ship was a continual source of maintenance problems engines were very unreliable.

Started major engine repairs 8/1943 but defects were found to be extremely serious decommissioned 6 November 1943 and used as a stores hulk. Used as an accommodations hulk after 3/1944. Main reduction gears replaced at Belfast starting 8/1944 repairs completed 3/1945 and transferred to the Ministry of War Transport as a ferry carrier (renamed Empire Lagan ) 15 March 1945.

Returned to USN 9 Jan 1946, stricken for disposal 26 Feb 1946. Sold into merchant service 1946 as Archer . Renamed Anne Salem 1949, Tasmania 1955, Union Reliance 1961. Burned, blown up and beached to prevent sinking at Houston TX 7 November 1961 after collision with tanker Berean . Salvaged and scrapped at New Orleans starting 3/1962.

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HMS Avenger class escort aircraft carriers
Displacement: 15,120 tons full load ( Charger in US service: 16,000 tons full load)
Dimensions: 465 x 69.5 x 25 feet/141.7 x 21.2 x 7.6 meters
Extreme Dimensions: 492 x 78 x 25 feet/149.9 x 23.7 x 7.6 meters
Propulsion: 6-cylinder Doxford diesels, 1 shaft, 8500 hp, 16.5 knots
Crew: 555 ( Charger in US service: 856)
Armor: none
Armament: 3 4/50, 19 20 mm ( Charger in US service: 1 single 5/38 DP, 4 single 3/50 AA, 4 quad 40 mm AA)
Aircraft: 15 ( Charger in US service: up to 36)

Concept/Program: Members of the first batch of escort carrier conversions. Converted from merchant C3 freighters, generally similar to Long Island but converted prior to completion as freighters. Ordered for RN service, but Charger was retained by USN for joint USN/RN training purposes.

Class: Not officially assigned USN class names as BAVGs. Charger officially was a one-unit class in US service.

Design/Conversion: Generally similar to Long Island but with a longer flight deck, larger hangar, and an island. These were still fairly minimal conversions.

Variations: Charger outfitted and ballasted to USN specifications.

Modifications: All RN ships had their US-style 4 inch guns replaced by British weapons in 1942.

Classification: All initially classed as BAVG. Charger switched into AVG series when returned to USN designated AVG, ACV and CVE in sequence.

Operational: RN employed these ships mostly as convoy escorts two were lost after relatively short service lives. USN used Charger as a training and transport carrier only.

Departure from Service/Disposal: Survivors deemed obsolete and quickly discarded postwar RN ship returned to USN for disposal. They were sold into merchant service and reconverted.

No name assigned
ex merchant Rio Hudson
Lend-Lease as HMS Avenger (D14)
MC Hull 59
BAVG 2
Photos: [ Rio Hudson , Rio Parana and Rio De La Plata just prior to conversion], [HMS Avenger ].


Built by Sun Shipbuilding. Laid down 28 November 1939, launched 27 Nov 1940, acquired by USN 20 May 1941. Converted at Bethlehem Staten Island, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Avenger (D14) 2 March 1942.

Served as convoy escort and participated in Operation Torch. Torpedoed and sunk by U-155 off Gibraltar 15 November 1942 uncontrollable fires and explosions resulted from single torpedo hit.


Built by Sun Shipbuilding. Laid down 28 December 1939, launched 18 Dec 1940. Acquired by USN 20 May 1941. Converted at Atlantic Basin Iron Works, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Biter (D97) 1 May 1942.

Employed in convoy escort duties. Damaged by a torpedo from her own aircraft 16 November 1943 after the aircraft ditched alongside. Damaged by fire in port 24 August 1944 no repair facilities were available and the ship was laid up in reserve. Returned to USN 9 April 1945 and immediately transferred to France as Dixmude . After limited service as a carrier she was used as a transport starting 1949 and was disarmed during 1951-1953. Stricken from USN Naval Vessels Register 24 Jan 1951. Hulked as an accommodation/base ship 1956. At the end of her active service she was listed at 8,500 tons displacement and 16 knots maximum speed. Returned to USN for disposal 10 June 1966. Subsequently sunk as a target.

DANFS History

Built by Sun Shipbuilding. Laid down 19 Jan 1940, launched 1 March 1941, Acquired by USN 20 May 1941. Converted at Newport News. Transferred to RN as HMS Charger (D27) 2 October 1941, but immediately returned to USN 4 Oct 1941 to serve as a training ship. Reclassified from BAVG 4 to AVG 30 24 Jan 1942 she was the only BAVG reclassified into the US AVG designation series. Commissioned in USN service 3 March 1942.

Used as training ship and aircraft ferry during WWII. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned 28 March 1946 and probably stricken for disposal same date, transferred to Maritime Commission for disposal 30 January 1947. Sold into merchant service as Fairsea in 1949. Scrapped at La Spezia in 1969.

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No name assigned
ex merchant Rio de Janeiro
Lend-Lease as HMS Dasher (D37)
MC Hull 62
BAVG 5
Photos: [HMS Dasher ]


Built by Sun Shipbuilding. Laid down 14 March 1940, launched 12 April 1941. Acquired by USN 20 May 1941. Converted at Tietjen & Lang, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Dasher (D37) 1 July 1942.

Participated in Operation Torch and saw limited service as convoy escort. Sunk by explosion during aircraft refueling in the Firth Of Clyde 27 March 1943.

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Bogue/HMS Attacker class escort aircraft carriers
Displacement: 16,620 tons design full load (14,630 tons full load in RN service)
Dimensions: 465 x 69.5 x 23.25 feet/141.7 x 21.2 x 7 meters
Extreme Dimensions: 495.5 x 111.5 x 23.25 feet/151 x 34 x 7 meters
Propulsion: Steam turbines, 2 285 psi boilers, 1 shaft, 8,500 hp, 18-18.5 knots
Crew: 908 (646 in RN service)
Armor: none
Armament: 2 single 5/38 DP, 10 single 20 mm (2 4/50 DP, 14 single 20 mm in RN service)
Aircraft: 24 (20 in RN service)

Concept/Program: This design was the final development of the converted C3 type. Converted from incomplete C3 hulls, so a greater degree of conversion was possible compared to the earlier C3 conversions. Half of these ships, plus HMS Tracker were transferred to RN.

Class: RN classified these ships as HMS Attacker class. HMS Tracker was built for transfer and was not considered by USN to be a Bogue class ship, but was classed with the Bogue s in RN's Attacker class. A second batch of Bogue s are listed separately these ships saw RN service as HMS Ameer class.

Design/Conversion: Developed from, and generally similar to, BAVG 2 through 5. Compared to earlier ships they had a longer and stronger flight deck, a much larger hangar, a second aircraft elevator, heavier armament, and steam turbine engines. The hangar deck floor was the original main deck in these ships, leading to difficulties in aircraft handling due to the sheer of this deck.

Variations: RN ships outfitted to RN standards.

Modifications: The RN ships were initially fitted with US 5/38 guns but were refitted with US 4/50 guns when modified for RN service the US 4/50 weapons were in turn replaced by British 4/50 weapons when the ships reached the UK. Many of ships were completed with empty sponsons for 4 dual 40 mm AA guns, which were eventually installed in almost all ships. The single 20 mm guns were later replaced by dual 20 mm mounts in USN ships and some RN vessels.

Modernization: No ships modernized for service as warships. Several were extensively converted for transport duties, see below.

Classification: Classed AVG, ACV, CVE in sequence HMS Tracker was classed BAVG only. RN assigned designations in the Dxx series. RN identified ships outfitted for ASW as "trade protection carriers" and ships outfitted for strike/CAP (fighter/strike aircraft) as "assault carriers". USN referred to ships used for transport as "CVE(T)".

RN initially gave these ships numbers in the Dxx series. Many ships were allocated Rxxx series numbers when they were scheduled for transfer to the British Pacific Fleet in 1945 these numbers apparently were not applied to ships which never reached the Pacific, and some ships received Axxx numbers instead. The Axxx numbers have not been fully documented in existing references. All Rxxx and Axxx ships returned to their original Dxx numbers before being returned to USN.

During the 1950's ships were reclassified CVU, CVHE and AKV depending on their role, or the role the would have assumed if returned to service.

Operational: In the US Navy these ships served in two major roles: ASW carriers and aircraft transports, with ships in both groups serving as training carriers at times. The RN added the role of strike/CAP carrier for those ships intended to supply fighter support for amphibious operations. In both navies, some ships served exclusively in one role while others worked in several different roles as operational requirements changed.

Departure from Service/Disposal: Following WWII these ships rapidly left service RN ships were sold for scrap or merchant service, while USN ships went into reserve. None of the reserve fleet ships returned to service as warships they were redesignated as helicopter ships in 1955. Several were reactivated as aircraft transports (see below) those remaining in reserve were discarded in 1959.

Other Notes: During the late 1950's several ships were reactivated from reserve to serve as aircraft transports. They were stripped of all armament and fitted with large cranes on the flight deck their islands were strengthened and their funnels were raised. These ships served primarily to transport aircraft to Vietnam. They had civilian crews and operated under the Military Sea Transport Service (MSTS), not under naval control they were "in service" rather than "in commission" and their designations were preceded by "T-". These ships were designated CVU when first reactivated, then designated AKV with new numbers. They were discarded in 1969-1971.

No name assigned
ex merchant
Lend-Lease as HMS Tracker (D24 - R317)
BAVG 6
Photos: [HMS Tracker ]


Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 3 Nov 1941, launched 7 March 1942, completed at Williamette, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Tracker (D24) 31 Jan 1943.

Outfitted as an ASW carrier employed as an escort for Atlantic and Russian convoys. Loaned to USN as a transport carrier 10 November 1944 operated in the Pacific. Assigned RN designation R317 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific, but probably not redesignated.

Returned to USN 29 Nov 1945, stricken for disposal 2 Nov 1946. Sold into merchant service as Corrientes . Scrapped in Portugal starting 8/1964.

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Altamaha
ex merchant Mormactern
Lend-Lease as HMS Battler (D18)
AVG 6 - ACV 6 - CVE 6
Photos: [HMS Battler ]

DANFS History

Built by Ingalls. Laid down 15 April 1941, named 7 Jan 1942 but name was cancelled 17 March 1942, launched 4 April 1942, acquired by USN, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Battler (D18) 31 Oct 1942.

Outfitted as ASW carrier. Served as escort for Gibraltar convoys and participated in the invasion of Italy, then served in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Returned to USN 12 Feb 1946, stricken for disposal 28 March 1946. Sold 14 May 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Barnes
ex merchant Steel Artisan
Lend-Lease as HMS Attacker (D02)
AVG 7 - ACV 7 - CVE 7
Photos: [HMS Attacker ]

DANFS History

Built by Western Pipe & Steel. Laid down 17 April 1941, launched 27 Sept 1942, acquired by USN, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Attacker (D02) 30 Sept 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served mostly in the Mediterranean supporting invasions before shifting to the Pacific. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Returned to USN 5 Jan 1946, stricken for disposal 26 Feb 1946. Sold into merchant service 28 Oct 1946 as Castel Forte . Renamed Fairsky 1970's. Hit submerged wreck 23 June 1977 and beached to prevent sinking, refloated 29 June 1977. Started conversion to floating hotel Philippine Tourist in 1978. Destroyed by fire 3 November 1979 and scrapped at Hong Kong starting 24 May 1980.

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Block Island
ex merchant Mormacpenn
Lend-Lease as HMS Hunter (D80)
AVG 8 - ACV 8 - CVE 8
Photos: [HMS Hunter ]

DANFS History

Built by Ingalls. Laid down 15 May 1941, launched 22 May 1942, acquired by USN, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Hunter (D80) 9 Jan 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Supported invasions and served as a convoy escort, then transferred to the Pacific. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Returned to USN 29 Dec 1945, stricken for disposal 26 Feb 1946. Sold into merchant service 17 Jan 1947 as Almdijk . Sold for scrapping 10/1965 and scrapped in Spain.

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Bogue
ex merchant Steel Advocate
AVG 9 - ACV 9 - CVE 9 - CVHE 9
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 1 Oct 1941, launched 15 Jan 1942, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, commissioned 26 Sept 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served as ASW carrier and transport in the Atlantic. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned to reserve 30 Nov 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 9) 12 June 1955 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Sold and subsequently scrapped in Japan starting 12/60.

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Breton
ex merchant Mormacgulf
Lend-Lease as HMS Chaser (D32 - R306)
AVG 10 - ACV 10 - CVE 10
Photos: [HMS Chaser ] [HMS Chaser designated R306]

DANFS History

Built by Ingalls. Laid down 28 June 1941, launched 15 Feb 1942, acquired by USN, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Chaser (D32) 9 April 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as ASW carrier. Served mostly as a convoy escort carrier, but transferred to the Pacific as a fighter carrier and transport late in the war. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. RN designation changed to R306 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 12 May 1946, stricken for disposal 3 July 1946. Sold into merchant service 20 Dec 1946 as Aagtekerk . Renamed E Yung in 1967. Burned and run ashore at Kaohsiung, Taiwan 20 Dec 1972 (or sank 4 December 1973 records are unclear) hulk scrapped in Taiwan in 1973.

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Card
ex merchant
AVG 11 - ACV 11 - CVE 11 - CVHE 11 - T-CVU 11 - T-AKV 40
Photos: [During WWII], [As MSTS transport (T-CVU)].

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 27 Oct 1941, launched 27 Feb 1942, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, commissioned 8 Nov 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served as ASW carrier and transport in the Atlantic for most of the war, then as training ship, then transferred to the Pacific. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned to reserve 3 May 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 11) 12 June 1955 while in reserve.

Redesignated as a utility carrier (CVU 11) 1 July 1958 and reactivated as aircraft transport same date underwent transport conversion and operated with civilian crew under MSTS control as T-CVU 11. Redesignated as an aviation transport (T-AKV 40) 7 May 1959. Mined and sunk 2 May 1964 dockside in Vietnam, raised 19 May 1964, returned to service 11 Dec 1964.

Placed out of service 10 March 1970, stricken for disposal 15 Sept 1970. Sold and scrapped in 1971.

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Copahee
ex merchant Steel Architect
AVG 12 - ACV 12 - CVE 12 - CVHE 12
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma, converted at Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 18 June 1941, launched 21 Oct 1941, acquired by USN 8 Feb 1942, commissioned 15 June 1942.

Served as a transport in the Pacific with a brief period as a combat carrier. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned to reserve 5 July 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 12) 12 June 1955 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Sold and scrapped in 1961.

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Core
ex merchant
AVG 13 - ACV 13 - CVE 13 - CVHE 13 - T-CVU 13 - T-AKV 41
Photos: [During WWII] [As MSTS transport (T-CVU)] [As MSTS transport (T-AKV)]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 2 Jan 1942, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, launched 15 May 1942, commissioned 10 Dec 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served as an ASW carrier and transport in the Atlantic. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned to reserve 4 Oct 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 13) 12 June 1955 while in reserve.

Redesignated as a utility carrier (CVU 13) 1 July 1958 and reactivated as aircraft transport same date underwent transport conversion and operated with civilian crew under MSTS control as T-CVU 13. Redesignated as an aviation transport (T-AKV 41) 7 May 1959.

Placed out of service 25 Nov 1969. Stricken for disposal 15 Sept 1970. Sold and scrapped in 1971.

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Croatan
ex merchant
Lend-Lease as HMS Fencer (D64 - R308)
AVG 14 - ACV 14 - CVE 14
Photos: [HMS Fencer ]

DANFS History

Built by Western Pipe & Steel. Laid down 5 Sept 1941, launched 4 April 1942, acquired by USN and commissioned in USN service 20 February 1942. Decommissioned and transferred to RN as HMS Fencer (D64) 27 Feb 1943, commissioned in RN service 1 March 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as an ASW carrier. Served on Atlantic, Russian and African convoys and participated in a strike on Tirpitz before transferring to the Pacific. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. RN designation changed to R308 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 11 Dec 1946, stricken for disposal 28 Jan 1947. Sold into merchant service as Sydney . Renamed Roma in 1967, Galaxy Queen in 1970, Lady Dina in 1972, Caribia in 1973. Scrapped at Spezia starting 9/1975.

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Hamlin
ex merchant
Lend-Lease as HMS Stalker (D91)
AVG 15 - ACV 15 - CVE 15
Photos: [At launch], [HMS Stalker ]

DANFS History

Built by Western Pipe & Steel. Laid down 6 Oct 1941, launched 5 March 1942, acquired by USN, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Stalker (D15) 21 Dec 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Supported invasions and served as a convoy escort carrier in the Mediterranean, then transferred to the Pacific. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Returned to USN 29 Dec 1945, stricken for disposal 20 March 1946. Sold into merchant service as Riouw . Renamed Lobito in 1968. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 9/1975.

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Nassau
ex merchant
AVG 16 - ACV 16 - CVE 16 - CVHE 16
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma, conversion completed by Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 27 Nov 1941, launched 4 April 1942, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, commissioned 20 Aug 1942.

Served mainly as a transport in the Pacific. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned to reserve 28 Oct 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 16) 12 June 1955 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Sold and scrapped in 1961.

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St. George
ex merchant Mormacland
Lend-Lease as HMS Pursuer (D73 - R309)
AVG 17 - ACV 17 - CVE 17
Photos: [HMS Pursuer ]

DANFS History

Built by Ingalls. Laid down 31 July 1941, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, launched 18 July 1942, transferred to RN as HMS Pursuer (D73) 11 June 1943, commissioned in RN service 14 June 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as an ASW carrier. Employed mostly for ASW work around the UK, but participated in a raid on Tirpitz , supported the invasion of southern France, and served as an ASW vessel at Normandy. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Assigned RN designation R309 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific, but probably not redesignated.

Returned to USN 12 Feb 1946, stricken for disposal 28 March 1946. Sold 5/1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Altamaha
ex merchant
AVG 18 - ACV 18 - CVE 18 - CVHE 18
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma, completed at Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 19 Dec 1941, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, launched 22 May 1942, commissioned 15 Sept 1942. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served as ASW carrier, transport and training carrier in the Pacific. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Damaged by typhoon 18 Dec 1944.

Decommissioned to reserve 27 Sept 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 18) 12 June 1955 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Sold 25 April 1961 and subsequently scrapped in Japan.

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Prince William
ex merchant
Lend-Lease as HMS Striker (D12 - R315)
AVG 19 - ACV 19 - CVE 19
Photos: [HMS Striker ]

DANFS History

Built by Western Pipe & Steel. Laid down 15 Dec 1941, launched 7 May 1942, acquired by USN and transferred to RN as HMS Striker (D12) 28 April 1943, commissioned in RN service 29 April 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as an ASW carrier. Served as an Atlantic convoy escort before transferring to the Pacific as a transport and fighter support carrier. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. RN designation changed to R315 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 12 Feb 1946, stricken for disposal 28 March 1946. Sold 6/1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Barnes
ex merchant
AVG 20 - ACV 20 - CVE 20 - CVHE 20
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 19 Jan 1942, launched 2 May 1942, commissioned 20 Feb 1943. Date acquired by USN uncertain. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served mostly as a transport in the Pacific. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned to reserve 29 Aug 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 20) 12 June 1955. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Subsequently sold and scrapped.

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 19 Jan 1942, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, launched 6 June 1942, commissioned 8 March 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served as a transport and ASW carrier in the Atlantic. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Torpedoed and sunk by U-549 off the Canary Islands 29 May 1944.

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No name assigned
ex merchant
Lend-Lease as HMS Searcher (D40)
AVG 22 - ACV 22 - CVE 22
Photos: [HMS Searcher ]


Built by Seattle-Tacoma, completed by Commercial Iron Works. Laid down 20 Feb 1942, launched 20 June 1942, acquired by USN 27 July 1942, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Searcher (D40) 7 April 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Operated mainly around the UK, but participated in a raid on Tirpitz , supported the invasion of southern France, and served as an ASW vessel at Normandy. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Returned to USN 29 Nov 1945, stricken for disposal 7 Feb 1946. Sold into merchant service as Captain Theo . Renamed Oriental Banker in 1965. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 4/1976.

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Breton
ex merchant
AVG 23 - ACV 23 - CVE 23 - CVHE 23 - T-CVU 23 - T-AKV 42
Photos: [During WWII], [As MSTS transport (T-CVU)].

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 25 Feb 1942, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, launched 27 June 1942, commissioned 12 April 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served exclusively as a transport in the Pacific. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942.

Decommissioned to reserve 20 Aug 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 23) 12 June 1955 while in reserve.

Redesignated as a utility carrier (CVU 23) 1 July 1958 and reactivated as aircraft transport same date underwent transport conversion and operated with civilian crew under MSTS control as T-CVU 23. Redesignated as an aviation transport (T-AKV 42) 7 May 1959. Placed out of service in 1971, stricken for disposal 6 August 1972. Sold and scrapped starting in 1972.

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No name assigned
ex merchant
Lend-Lease as HMS Ravager (D70)
AVG 24 - ACV 24 - CVE 24
Photos: [HMS Ravager ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma, completed by Commercial Iron Works. Laid down 11 April 1942, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, launched 16 July 1942, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Ravager (D70) 25 April 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served mainly as a training carrier. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Returned to USN 26 Feb 1946, stricken for disposal 12 April 1946. Sold into merchant service as Robin Trent . Later renamed Trent . Scrapped in Taiwan in 1973.

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Croatan
ex merchant
AVG 25 - ACV 25 - CVE 25 - CVHE 25 - T-CVU 25 - T-AKV 43
Photos: [During WWII], [As NASA experimental ship], [As NASA experimental ship].

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 15 April 1942, acquired by USN 1 May 1942, launched 1 Aug 1942, commissioned 28 April 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning.

Served as a transport and ASW carrier in the Atlantic. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned to reserve 20 May 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 25) 12 June 1955 while in reserve.

Redesignated as a utility carrier (CVU 25) 1 July 1958 and reactivated as aircraft transport same date underwent transport conversion and operated with civilian crew under MSTS control as T-CVU 25. Redesignated as an aviation transport (T-AKV 43) 7 May 1959. Served as a experimental ship under NASA control 10/64 to 5/65, then resumed transport duties. Placed out of service 23 Oct 1969, stricken for disposal 15 Sept 1970. Subsequently sold and scrapped in 1971.

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Repeat Bogue/HMS Ameer class escort aircraft carriers
Displacement: 16,620 tons design full load (15,646 tons full load in RN service)
Dimensions: 465 x 69.5 x 23.25 feet/141.7 x 21.2 x 7 meters
Extreme Dimensions: 495.5 x 111.5 x 23.25 feet/151 x 34 x 7 meters
Propulsion: Steam turbines, 2 285 psi boilers, 1 shaft, 8,500 hp, 18-18.5 knots
Crew: 908 (646 in RN service)
Armor: none
Armament: 2 single 5/38 DP, 4 dual 40 mm AA, 10 dual 20 mm AA
Aircraft: 24 (20 in RN service)

Concept/Program: A second group of Bogue class ships was ordered in response to continued need for escort carriers. These ships were built from the keel up as carriers, rather than being converted merchant hulls, but were in almost all respects identical to the first batch of Bogues . Initially plans called for several ships to be retained by USN, but in the event all but one of these ships transferred to RN. Several ships went to RN after very brief USN commissions.

Class: Although USN classed these ships with the first group of Bogue s, RN put them in a separate class, the HMS Ameer class.

Design: Slightly improved version of original Bogue design. This class included changes which had been gradually applied to the previous group, including the 4 dual 40 mm AA and replacement of single 20 mm guns with dual mounts. In this group the RN ships retained their US 5/38 mounts rather than exchanging them for 4/50 guns.

Variations: RN ships ballasted differently due to fuel storage practices.

Modifications: Some RN ships deployed to the Pacific had 20 mm mounts replaced by single 40 mm mounts.

Other Notes: See Bogue /HMS Attacker class entry.

Prince William
AVG 31 - ACV 31 - CVE 31 - CVHE 31
Photos: [During WWII]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma, completed by Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 18 May 1942, launched 23 Aug 1942, commissioned 9 April 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning. Date acquired by USN uncertain.

Served as a transport in the Pacific, then as a transport and training carrier in the Atlantic. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Decommissioned to reserve 29 Aug 1946. Redesignated as a helicopter escort carrier (CVHE 31) 12 June 1955 while in reserve. Stricken for disposal 1 March 1959. Subsequently sold and scrapped 3/61 in Japan.

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Chatham
Lend-Lease as HMS Slinger (D26 - R313)
AVG 32 - ACV 32 - CVE 32
Photos: [HMS Slinger ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma, completed by Williamette. Laid down 25 May 1942, launched 19 Sept 1942, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Slinger (D26) 11 Aug 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a transport carrier. Mined 5 Feb 1944, repairs compeleted 17 October 1944. After transport service she transferred to the Pacific as a fighter carrier. RN designation changed to R313 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 27 Feb 1946, stricken for disposal 12 April 1946. Sold into merchant service as Robin Mowbray . Scrapped in Taiwan starting 1/1970.

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Glacier
Lend-Lease as HMS Atheling (D51 - R304)
AVG 33 - ACV 33 - CVE 33
Photos: [HMS Atheling ]

DANFS History

Built by Bremerton Navy Yard. Laid down 9 June 1942, launched 7 Sept 1942, commissioned in USN service 3 July 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both before commissioning. Decommissioned for transfer 31 July 1943.

Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as Atheling (D51) 1 August 1943. Outfitted as an ASW carrier. Served in the Indian Ocean and Far East starting 1944. RN designation changed to R304 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to US 13 Dec 1946, stricken for disposal 7 Feb 1947. Sold into merchant service as Roma . Scrapped in Italy starting 11/1967.

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Pybus
Lend-Lease as HMS Emperor (D98 - R307)
AVG 34 - ACV 34 - CVE 34
Photos: [HMS Emperor ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 23 June 1942, launched 7 Oct 1942, commissioned in USN service 31 May 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to commissioning. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943. Decommissioned for transfer 6 August 1943.

Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Emperor (D98) 6 August 1943. Outfitted as a strike/CAP carrier. Provided fighter cover for a strike on Tirpitz , served as an ASW patrol ship at Normandy and supported invasion of southern France before transferring to the Pacific. RN designation changed to R307 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 12 Feb 1946, stricken for disposal 28 March 1946. Subsequently sold and scrapped.

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Baffins
Lend-Lease as HMS Ameer (D01 - R302)
AVG 35 - ACV 35 - CVE 35
Photos: [HMS Ameer ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 18 July 1942, launched 18 Oct 1942, commissioned in USN service 28 June 1943. Decommissioned and transferred to RN as HMS Ameer (D01) 19 July 1943, commissioned in RN service 20 July 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a strike/CAP carrier. Served in the Pacific late in the war, in strike, CAP and ASW roles. RN designation changed to R302 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 17 Jan 1946, stricken for disposal 20 March 1946. Sold into merchant service 17 Sept 1946 as Robin Kirk . Scrapped in Taiwan 1969.

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Bolinas
Lend-Lease as HMS Begum (D38 - R305)
AVG 36 - ACV 36 - CVE 36
Photos: [HMS Begum ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 3 Aug 1942, launched 11 Nov 1942, commissioned in US service 22 July 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Decommissioned for transfer, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Begum (D38) 12 August 1943. Outfitted as ASW carrier. Served in Pacific and Middle East starting 1944. RN designation changed to R305 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 4 Jan 1946, stricken for disposal 19 June 1946. Sold into merchant service 16 April 1947 as Raki . Renamed I Yung in 1966. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 3/1974.

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Bastian
Lend-Lease as HMS Trumpeter (D09 - R318)
AVG 37 - ACV 37 - CVE 37
Photos: [HMS Trumpeter ]


Built by Seattle-Tacoma, completed by Commercial Iron Works. Laid down 25 Aug 1942, launched 15 Dec 1942, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Trumpeter (D37) 4 Aug 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to completion. Initially assigned name HMS Lucifer .

Outfitted as an ASW carrier. Served as a convoy escort, then transferred to the Pacific late in the war. RN designation changed to R318 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 6 April 1946, stricken for disposal 19 June 1946. Sold into merchant service as Alblasserdijk . Later renamed Irene Valmas . Scrapped in Spain starting 1/1971.

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Carnegie
Lend-Lease as HMS Empress (D42)
AVG 38 - ACV 38 - CVE 38
Photos: [HMS Empress ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 9 Sept 1942, launched 30 Dec 1942, transferred to RN 8 June 1943, commissioned in RN service as HMS Empress (D42) 12 August 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 prior to completion. Designation changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943.

Outfitted as a strike/CAP carrier. Served in the Pacific and Indian Ocean.

Returned to USN 4 Feb 1946, stricken for disposal 28 March 1946. Sold 21 June 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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Cordova
Lend-Lease as HMS Khedive (D62)
AVG 39 - ACV 39 - CVE 39
Photos: [HMS Khedive ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 30 Dec 1942, launched 30 Jan 1943, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Khedive (D62) 25 August 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a strike/CAP carrier. Manned by the Canadian Navy. Served off southern France, then in the eastern Mediterranean, then in the Pacific.

Returned to USN 26 Jan 1946, stricken for disposal 19 July 1946. Sold into merchant service as Rempang . Renamed Daphne in 1968. Scrapped in Spain starting 1/1975.

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Delgada
Lend-Lease as HMS Speaker (D90 - R314)
AVG 40 - ACV 40 - CVE 40
Photos: [HMS Speaker ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma, completed by Commercial Iron Works. Laid down 9 Oct 1942, launched 20 Feb 1943, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Speaker (D90) 20 November 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Served as a transport carrier, with brief periods as a training carrier served in the Pacific late in the war. RN designation changed to R314 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 17 July 1946, stricken for disposal 25 Sept 1946. Sold into merchant service as Lancero 1948. Renamed President Osmena in 1965, then renamed Lucky One in 1971 for delivery voyage to shipbreakers. Scrapped in Taiwan in 1972.

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Edisto
Lend-Lease as HMS Nabob (D77)
AVG 41 - ACV 41 - CVE 41
Photos: [HMS Nabob in danger of sinking 22 Aug 1944]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 20 Oct 1942, launched 22 March 1943, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Nabob (D77) 7 September 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to completion.

Outfitted as an ASW carrier. Manned by the Canadian Navy. Torpedoed by U-354 22 Aug 1944 in the Barents Sea with severe damage arrived at Scapa Flow 27 August 1944 for emergency repairs. Judged not worth repairing, towed to Rosyth, beached and abandoned, decommissioned 30 September 1944 but retained in nominal reserve. Was stripped to support sisterships.

Returned to USN at Rosyth and stricken for disposal 16 March 1946. Sold for scrapping in Holland 3/1947. Resold and converted to merchant Nabob in 1952. Renamed Glory in 1968. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 12/1977.

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Estero
Lend-Lease as HMS Premier (D23)
AVG 42 - ACV 42 - CVE 42
Photos: [HMS Premier ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 31 Oct 1942, launched 22 March 1943, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Premier (D23) 3 November 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as an ASW carrier. Served as an escort in European waters and as a ferry carrier.

Returned to USN 2 April 1946, stricken for disposal 21 May 1946. Sold into merchant service as Rhodesia Star 1947. Renamed Hong Kong Knight in 1967. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 2/1974.

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Jamaica
Lend-Lease as HMS Shah (D21 - R312)
AVG 43 - ACV 43 - CVE 43
Photos: [HMS Shah ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 13 Nov 1942, launched 21 April 1943, transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Shah (D21) 27 September 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as an ASW carrier. Served in the Pacific and Indian Oceans starting 1944. RN designation changed to R312 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 6 Dec 1945, stricken for disposal 7 Feb 1946. Sold into merchant service as Salta 20 June 1947. Scrapped at Buenos Aires starting 6/1966.

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Keneenaw
Lend-Lease as HMS Patroller (D07)
AVG 44 - ACV 44 - CVE 44
Photos: [HMS Patroller ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 27 Nov 1942, launched 6 May 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Patroller (D07) 22 October 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a transport carrier served in both Atlantic and Pacific. Loaned to US Army as a transport carrier 15 March 1944 to 2 May 1944. Loaned to US Navy as a transport carrier 28 January 1945 to 5/1945. Served as a troopship postwar.

Returned to USN 13 Dec 1946, stricken for disposal 7 Feb 1947. Sold into merchant service as Almkerk . Renamed Pacific Reliance in 1969. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 2/1974.

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Prince
ex McClure
Lend-Lease as HMS Rajah (D10 - R310)
AVG 45 - ACV 45 - CVE 45
Photos: [HMS Rajah ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma, completed by Wiliamette. Laid down 17 Dec 1942, launched 18 May 1943, renamed 13 Dec 1943, Transferred to RN 17 October 1943, commissioned in RN service as HMS Rajah (D10) 17 January 1944. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a transport carrier also served as a training carrier. Served in the far east for most of the war. RN designation changed to R310 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 13 Dec 1946, stricken for disposal 7 Feb 1947. Sold into merchant service as Drente 7 July 1947. Renamed Lambros in 1966, Ulysses in 1969. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 6/1975.

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Niantic
Lend-Lease as HMS Ranee (D03 - R323)
AVG 46 - ACV 46 - CVE 46
Photos: [HMS Ranee ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 5 Jan 1943, launched 2 June 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Ranee (D03) 8 November 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a strike/CAP carrier, but also served as a transport carrier and a training carrier. Loaned to USN as a transport carrier 4 February 1944 returned to RN shortly thereafter. Also loaned to USN as a transport carrier 21 January 1945 to 5/1945. RN designation changed to R323 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 21 Nov 1946, stricken for disposal 22 Jan 1947. Sold into merchant service as Friesland 1948. Renamed Pacific Breeze in 1967. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 5/1974.

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Perdido
Lend-Lease as HMS Trouncer (D85)
AVG 47 - ACV 47 - CVE 47
Photos: [HMS Trouncer ]

DANFS History

Built by Commercial Iron Works. Laid down 1 Jan 1943, launched 17 June 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Trouncer (D85) 31 January 1944. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a transport carrier. Served in the Pacific and Indian oceans.

Returned to USN 3 March 1946, stricken for disposal 12 April 1946. Sold into merchant service as Greystoke Castle . Renamed Gallic in 1954, Berinnes in 1959. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 11/1973.

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Sunset
Lend-Lease as HMS Thane (D83 - R316)
AVG 48 - ACV 48 - CVE 48
Photos: [HMS Thane ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 22 Feb 1943, launched 15 July 1943 Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Thane (D83) 19 November 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a strike/CAP carrier, but also used as a ferry carrier. Torpedoed by U-1172 in the Firth of Clyde 15 January 1945. Judged not to be worth repairing and decommissioned to reserve at Faslane. Assigned RN designation R316 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific, but probably not redesignated.

Returned to USN at Faslane 15 Dec 1945 and probably stricken for disposal same date. Subsequently sold and scrapped at Faslane in 1946.

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St. Andrews
Lend-Lease as HMS Queen (D19 - R320)
AVG 49 - ACV 49 - CVE 49
Photos: [HMS Queen ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 12 March 1943, launched 2 Aug 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Queen (D19) 7 Dec 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a strike/CAP carrier. Served as an escort for Russia convoys late in the war took part in strike on German shipping in Norway 5/1945. Assigned RN designation R320 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific, but probably not redesignated. Employed as a troopship postwar.

Returned to USN 31 Oct 1946, stricken for disposal 22 Jan 1947. Sold into merchant service as Roebiah 29 July 1947. Renamed President Marcos in 1967, then renamed Lucky One in 1972 for delivery voyage to shipbreakers. Scrapped in Taiwan in 1972.

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St. Joseph
Lend-Lease as HMS Ruler (D72 - A731)
AVG 50 - ACV 50 - CVE 50
Photos: [HMS Ruler ] [HMS Ruler designated A731]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 25 March 1943, launched 21 Aug 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Ruler (D72) 22 December 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Served mainly as a transport carrier also operated as a fighter carrier in the Pacific late in the war. Assigned RN designation R311 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific, but carried A731 instead.

Returned to USN 29 Jan 1946, stricken for disposal 20 March 1946. Sold 31 May 1946 and subsequently scrapped.

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St. Simon
Lend-Lease as HMS Arbiter (D31 - R303)
AVG 51 - ACV 51 - CVE 51
Photos: [HMS Arbiter ] [HMS Arbiter designated R303]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 26 April 1943, launched 9 Sept 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Arbiter (D31) 31 December 1943. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a transport carrier. Served as a transport and CAP carrier in the Pacific late in the war. RN designation changed to R303 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 3 March 1946, stricken for disposal 12 April 1946. Sold into merchant service as Coracero 30 January 1947. Renamed President Macapagal in 1965, then renamed Lucky Two in 1972 for delivery voyage to shipbreakers. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 5/1972.

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Vermillion
Lend-Lease as HMS Smiter (D55 - R321)
AVG 52 - ACV 52 - CVE 52
Photos: [HMS Smiter ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 10 May 1943, launched 27 Sept 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Smiter (D55) 20 January 1944. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a strike/CAP carrier. Served mostly as an ASW escort. Assigned RN designation R321 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific, but probably not redesignated.

Returned to USN 6 April 1946, stricken for disposal 21 May 1946. Sold into merchant service as Artillero 6 April 1946. Renamed President Garcia in 1965. Wrecked off Guernsey 7/1967 and was a total loss hulk scrapped at Hamburg starting 11/1967.

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Willapa
Lend-Lease as HMS Puncher (D79)
AVG 53 - ACV 53 - CVE 53
Photos: [HMS Puncher ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 21 May 1943, launched 8 Nov 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Puncher (D79) 5 February 1944. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Initially outfitted as a transport carrier by Burrards at Vancouver, Canada, but refitted as a strike/CAP carrier in the UK. Canadian manned. Served mostly as an Atlantic ASW carrier and as a training carrier. Main reduction gears destroyed 27 November 1944 replaced by gearing from Nabob .

Used as a troopship immediately postwar. Returned to USN 16 Jan 1946, stricken for disposal 12 March 1946. Sold into merchant service as Muncaster Castle . Renamed Bardic in 1954, Ben Nevis in 1959. Scrapped in Taiwan starting 6/1973

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Winjah
Lend-Lease as HMS Reaper (D82 - R324)
AVG 54 - ACV 54 - CVE 54
Photos: [HMS Reaper ]

DANFS History

Built by Seattle-Tacoma. Laid down 5 June 1943, launched 22 Nov 1943, Transferred to RN and commissioned in RN service as HMS Reaper (D82) 18 February 1944. Designation changed from AVG to ACV 20 August 1942 changed from ACV to CVE 15 July 1943, both prior to commissioning.

Outfitted as a transport carrier. Loaned to USN as a transport carrier from 5 January 1945 to 5/1945. RN designation changed to R324 circa 1945 for service in the Pacific returned to previous designation postwar.

Returned to USN 20 May 1946, stricken for disposal 2 July 1946. Sold into merchant service as South Africa Star . Scrapped at Nikara, Japan starting 5/1967.


Military service as Shah [ edit ]

MC Hull 254 was laid down 13 November 1942 and launched as Jamaica under contract to the Maritime Commission by Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Β] at Tacoma, Washington, on 21 April 1943 sponsored by Mrs. C. T. Simard. She was reclassified CVE-43 on 15 July 1943 and acquired by the United States Navy.

She was transferred to the United Kingdom under lend-lease, commissioning on 27 September 1943, as one of a large group of escort carriers suitable for anti-submarine work transferred to the Royal Navy in the Pacific.

Jamaica was renamed Shah, with a RN pennant number of D21. Commanded by William John Yendell, Γ] her initial air complement was 851 Naval Air Squadron with 12 Grumman Avenger II torpedo bombers and a flight of Grumman Wildcat fighters. Α]

After sea trials, she was modified in Canada for convoy defence, this being completed at the end of the year. She sailed from Vancouver for San Francisco to take on her complement of operational aircraft, 12 Grumman Avengers and a flight of Grumman Wildcats. However, no flying was possible as her decks were also filled with Curtiss P-40s to be ferried to Cochin. From San Francisco she sailed to Williamstown, Melbourne, Australia. After resupplying she continued in this configuration to Cochin and Colombo.

Her duties were chiefly convoy defence and trade protection against German U-boats operating in the Indian Ocean with a shore base at Trincomalee. She took an active part in the war, heading the hunter-killer group which sank U-198 in the Indian Ocean on 12 August 1944. Alerted to the submarine's presence in the area, 851's Avengers located the U-boat and attempted to attack her, and directed the other ships in the group, HMS Begum, the River-class frigate HMS Findhorn and the Black Swan-class sloop HMIS Godavari to a point where the U-boat was depth charged resulting in it sinking.

Shah was transferred to the East Indies Fleet and then refitted in Durban before taking part in the Burma campaign in 1945. Having suffered several aircraft losses on patrol and landing accidents, her complement was augmented around this time by a flight of Grumman Hellcats. During April and May 1945 she participated in Operation Bishop, launching patrols and strikes against Nicobar preparatory to the invasion of Rangoon. Α] Soon after, she was tasked with the search for the Japanese cruiser Haguro. Mechanical problems with the catapult resulted in most of 851's Avengers being sent to HMS Emperor in exchange for Hellcats from 800 and 804 Squadron. A serious landing accident by one of those Hellcats effectively removed Shah from operations on 11 May. Nonetheless 851's Avengers, flying from Emperor, were able to locate and damage Haguro, prior to her sinking by the 26th Destroyer Flotilla in Operation Dukedom.

The Hellcats that survived the earlier landing accident were flown off Shah and she briefly returned to Ceylon and Bombay for refitting and training. Collecting surviving Avengers from 851 and 845 Squadrons, plus Hellcats and a Walrus for support and recovery during landing operations, in August she sailed to join Operation Zipper on the Malay coast, only to be stood down en route when Japan capitulated.

Disembarking her aircraft at Trincomalee on 26 August, she then sailed to the Clyde naval base via Aden and the Suez Canal where she was prepared for return to the United States. Arriving at Norfolk on 16 October, she was formally handed over to the United States on 26 November 1945. Α]


Modern Rastafarianism


A turning point for Rastafarianism came in 1975, when Emperor Selassie died and forced his followers to confront the contradiction of a living deity passing away. In 1981, the movement lost its second major figure with the death of Marley from cancer.

Always a decentralized faith and culture, Rastafari attempted to introduce a unifying element with a series of international conferences in the 1980s and �s. Smaller divisions, such as African Unity, Covenant Rastafari and the Selassian Church, emerged around the turn of the millennium, the same period which brought the passing of longtime leaders Prince Emanuel Charles Edwards (1994) and the Prophet Gad (2005).


Return of Immigrants who arrived in the island of Jamaica from the 30th September 1840 to the 30th September 1841 under the immigration Act 4th Victoria Chapter 23. (CO140/133. NA. Kew). There were 1,417 immigrants listed in the report, and they were grouped by families.

The official report gave the name of the Ship or Vessel, and the Port from whence it came. It listed the date and place of arrival in Jamaica. The name and age of each immigrant was listed, and sometimes the trade or calling was included. Newspaper reports provided additional information on some of the immigrants, including their nationalities.

For the passenger lists for the 13 ships on which they arrived, please use the link to "Immigration" below.

For names and details concerning these immigrants, please go to Immigration lead page


HMS Shah

HMS Shah was a Ruler class escort carrier that served in the Far East, spending most of 1944 on anti-submarine patrols and general escort duties, before taking part in several major operations during 1945. The Shah was laid down on 13 May 1942 as USS Jamaica (CVE-43).

Early in 1944 the carriers Formidable, Indomitable and Victorious were promised to the East Indies Fleet, but events elsewhere meant that they were unable to sail east until much later. Shah, Begum and Unicorn were sent east instead in an attempt to provide extra carrier strength until the fleet carriers could arrive. The Shah reached Katukurunda by April 1944, where No.851 received Wildcats to work alongside its Avengers. Over the next few months the Shah took part in anti-U-boat and general escort duties, attacking three U-boats in August. The

On 10 and 12 August Begum and Shah, as part of Force 66, sighted and attacked an enemy submarine. This was part of a wider hunt that lasted for eight days, ended in the destruction of the submarine, and saw personnel from HMS Findhorn, HMS Shah, HMS Begum, HMS Taff and HMIS Godavari win awards.

The Shah remained in the Indian Ocean area for the rest of the year, first attached to the Eastern Fleet, and then to the East Indies Fleet.

In April-May 1945 the British launched Operation Dracula - the liberation of Rangoon. The carriers Shah and Empress, along with the battleship Queen Elizabeth took part in Operation Bishop, intended to prevent any Japanese surface ships based further south from interfering. The fleet left Trincomalee on 27 April, and between 30 April and 7 May carried out a series of air attacks and bombardments of targets on the Andaman and Nicobar Islands and on the Tenasserim coast. Nine officers and men from Shah, Empress and Queen Elizabeth won awards during the fighting.

While returning from Operation Bishop a destroyer accompanying the Shah and Empress detected radio messages from the Japanese heavy cruiser Haguro. These transmissions ended before any strike could be launched, and on 9 May the carriers returned to port.

While this close encounter was underway Japanese signals were intercepted and broken. This revealed that the cruiser Haguro would be returning to sea to travel to Port Blair on the Andaman Islands to cover the evacuation fo the garrison, staying there for the night of 12-13 May and then returning to Singapore. Shah, Empress, Khedive and Hunter put back to sea as Force 61 in an attempt to intercept the cruiser (Operation Dukedom). This time the Japanese were caught. Aircraft from No.851 Squadron attacked the cruiser on 15 May, although without inflicting any insignificant damage. On the following day the destroyers of Force 63 caught the cruiser and hit her with a number of torpedoes. The Haguro apparently escaped from the trap, but sank on the following day.

On 10 August a fleet including the escort carriers Ameer, Emperor, Empress, Khedive and Shah left Trincomalee to attack airfields and shipping in the Penang and Medan areas. The Japanese surrender came before the attack was carried out, and the fleet returned to harbour on 15 August.

On 17 August Shah, Attacker, Hunter and Stalker formed part of a fleet that left Trincomalee to support the occupation of Penang (Operation Jurist), which was completed without any opposition.

Shah returned to the UK in September 1945 bringing with her the personnel from Nos.845 and 851 Squadrons.

The Shah was returned to the US Navy on 6 December 1945 and sold off as a merchantman.

One flight of Hellcats from No.804 Squadron was onboard for Operation Dukedom in May 1945

The Seafires of No.809 Squadron transferred from the Stalker for Operation Dukedom.

A detachment of four Avengers from No.845 Squadron joined Shah in the summer of 1945, followed by the entire squadron, in preparation for the invasion of Sumatra. The end of the war came first and the squadron's personnel were shipped back to the UK on the Shah.

No.851 Squadron embarked on Shah with Avengers in January 1944 and operated from the carrier and a selection for shore bases for the rest of the war (apart from one week spend on Emperor). Wildcats were added in April 1944. The squadron returned to the UK on the Shah at the end of the war.

No.888 Squadron was a photo-reconnaissance squadron equipped with PR Hellcats. During 1945 it operated on at least five carriers, including Shah.

No.1700 Squadron was formed as an amphibian bomber-reconnaissance equipped with the Walrus and Sea Otter. It travelled to the Far East on Khedive between 8 January and 8 February 1945 and then dispersed onto Stalker, Hunter, Emperor, Ameer, Attacker, Shah and Khedive, performing mine-sweeping and search and rescue duties. It returned to shore bases at the end of the war.


Description

The name can be interpreted as a combination of words from stability and gauge , where gauge is an English technical term for a simple measuring device. During the Second World War , the Stabilogauge, which was developed from a fire control computer by the American Hydromath Company , was standard equipment for all ships ordered by the US government. The constant ship-typical data required to determine the stability were entered in the form of electrical resistors and capacitors . Therefore, each ship had its own stabilog eye, and the ship's name was engraved on the stability calculator.

The variable data that are important for the stability of the ship, such as cargo , ballast and fuel , were entered into the device by the cargo officer for the individual rooms and tanks using lateral micrometer screws. Corrections were also made for free liquid surfaces, charge density and trim .

The picture example shows the stabilog eye of Jamaica . She was built as the C3 merchant ship Jamaica at Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding, Tacoma, Washington , and commissioned as the Bogue-class escort aircraft carrier USS Jamaica (CVE-43) . It was given to Great Britain in September 1942 and was then called HMS Shah . In 1947 she was converted into a merchant ship, renamed Salta and scrapped in 1966.


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