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Pruitt DD-347 - History

Pruitt DD-347 - History

Pruitt DD-347

Pruitt(DD-347: dp. 1,190; 1. 314'5"; b. 31'8", dr. 9'3"; s. 30 k., cpl.195; a. 4 4", 1 3", 12 21" tt.; cl. Clem~on)Pruitt (DD-347) was laid down 25 June 1919 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Me., Iaunehed 2 August 1920, sponsored by Mrs. Belle Pruitt; and commissioned 2 September 1920, Lt. M. R. Derx in command.During the interwar period, Pruitt operated in the Western Pacific, protecting American interests in the Far East. A unit of MinDiv 1, she was undergoing overhaul at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 7 December 1941. At 0753 low flying Japanese planes flew over the base and within minutes some of Pruitt's crew had sprinted to other ships and fired their first bullets under war conditions. Others manned fire hoses and helped distribute ammunition. At the end of January 1942, Pruitt completed overhaul and took up offshore patrol and minelaying duties with the Hawaiian Sea Frontier. Continuing operations there into June, she sailed, on the 19th, for Bremerton, whence she steamed to the Aleutians for minelaying operations and escort assignments out of Kodiak. Into the fall she continued operations in the Aleutians, interrupted by regular runs back to the Hawaiian Islands, then took up escort duties along the west coast.With the new year, 1943, Pruitt shifted south and trained with the 4th Marine Raider Battalion off Southern California. Further escort assignments followed and on 24 April she departed San Francisco to return to the Aleutians. Sailing with TF 51, she steamed to Cold Bay, thence to Attu. On 11 May she arrived off the latter, escorted landing craft into Masssere Bay, then dispatched the boat waves. After the initial assault she took up antisubmarine and anti-aircraft patrols. Later shifting to Holtz Bay, she continued to perform patrol duties and to escort smaller craft from Amehitka and Adak until the end of the month.On 6 June Pruitt returned to San Francisco and coastal escort duties. Through the summer she steamed along the coast from Alaska to Southern California and in September got underway for the Solomons. At the end of October she arrived at Purvis Bay, Florida Island, whence she steamed to Bougainville.Taking on mines at Aore, New Hebrides, she planted mines along Bougainville's southern Beast on the 2nd, 8th, and 24th of November in support of operations on Cape Torokina, then in December shifted to escort assignments between and among the Solomons, New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and the Soeieties.Pruitt returned to San Francisco 18 July 1944, underwent overhaul, and in October sailed back to Pearl Harbor where she began submarine training operations. Detsehed toward the end of November, she patrolled off Midway 29 November15 January 1945. On 22 January she resumed operations with the Training Command, Submarine Force and for the remainder of World War II trained submarines southwest of Oahu. Redesignated AG-101, 5 June 1945, she was ordered inactivated three months later and on 21 September she sailed east, arriving at Philadelphia 18 October. Decommissioning 16 November 1945, she was struck from the Navy List 5 December 1945. She was later scrapped at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.Pruitt earned 3 battle stars during World War II.


Service history

During the interwar period, Pruitt operated in the Western Pacific, protecting American interests in the Far East. She was converted to a light minelayer and according redesignated DM-22 on 30 June 1937. LTJG Richard O'Kane, who would win the Medal of Honor as the most successful U.S. submarine officer of World War II, served aboard Pruit from 1935 through shipyard conversion to a minelayer. [ 1 ]

A unit of Mine Division 1, she was undergoing overhaul at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 7 December 1941, with future Rear Admiral George Stephen Morrison on board. At 07:53, Japanese planes flew over the base at low altitude and within minutes some of Pruitt ' s crew had sprinted to other ships and fired their first bullets under war conditions. Others manned fire hoses and helped distribute ammunition during the attack on Pearl Harbor. At the end of January 1942, Pruitt completed overhaul and took up offshore patrol and minelaying duties with the Hawaiian Sea Frontier. Continuing operations there into June, she sailed, on the 19th, for Bremerton, Washington, from where she steamed to the Aleutian Islands for minelaying operations and escort assignments out of Kodiak. Into the fall she continued operations in the Aleutians, interrupted by regular runs back to the Hawaiian Islands, and then took up escort duties along the west coast.

With the new year, 1943, Pruitt shifted south and trained with the 4th Marine Raider Battalion off Southern California. Further escort assignments followed and on 24 April she departed San Francisco, California to return to the Aleutians. Sailing with TF㺳, she steamed to Cold Bay, thence to Attu. On 11 May, she arrived off the latter, escorted landing craft into Massacre Bay, and then dispatched the boat waves. After the initial assault she took up anti-submarine and anti-aircraft patrols. Later shifting to Holtz Bay, she continued to perform patrol duties and to escort smaller craft from Amchitka and Adak until the end of the month.

On 6 June Pruitt returned to San Francisco and coastal escort duties. Through the summer she steamed along the coast from Alaska to Southern California and in September got underway for the Solomon Islands. At the end of October, she arrived at Purvis Bay, Florida Island, whence she steamed to Bougainville.

Taking on mines at Acre, New Hebrides, she planted mines along Bougainville's southern coast on the 2nd, 8th, and 24 November in support of operations on Cape Torokina, then in December shifted to escort assignments between and among the Solomons, New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and the Societies.

Pruitt returned to San Francisco on 18 July 1944, underwent overhaul, and in October sailed back to Pearl Harbor where she began submarine training operations. Detached toward the end of November, she patrolled off Midway from 29 November – 15 January 1945. On 22 January she resumed operations with the Training Command, Submarine Force and for the remainder of World War II trained submarines southwest of Oahu.

Redesignated AG–101 on 5 June 1945, she was ordered inactivated three months later, and on 21 September she sailed east, arriving at Philadelphia in October.

Decommissioning on 16 November 1945, she was struck from the Navy List on 5 December 1945. She was later scrapped at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.


Contents

During the interwar period, Pruitt operated in the Western Pacific, protecting American interests in the Far East. She was converted to a light minelayer and accordingly redesignated DM-22 on 30 June 1937. LTJG Richard O'Kane, who would be awarded the Medal of Honor as the most successful U.S. submarine officer of World War II, served aboard Pruitt from 1935 through shipyard conversion to a minelayer. Ώ]

A unit of Mine Division 1, she was undergoing overhaul at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 7 December 1941, with future Rear Admiral George Stephen Morrison on board. At 07:53, Japanese planes flew over the base at low altitude and within minutes some of Pruitt ' s crew had sprinted to other ships and fired their first bullets. Others manned fire hoses and helped distribute ammunition during the attack on Pearl Harbor. At the end of January 1942, Pruitt completed overhaul and took up offshore patrol and minelaying duties with the Hawaiian Sea Frontier. Continuing operations there into June, she sailed, on the 19th, for Bremerton, Washington, from where she steamed to the Aleutian Islands for minelaying operations and escort assignments out of Kodiak. Into the fall she continued operations in the Aleutians, interrupted by regular runs back to the Hawaiian Islands, and then took up escort duties along the west coast.

With the new year, 1943, Pruitt shifted south and trained with the 4th Marine Raider Battalion off Southern California. Further escort assignments followed and on 24 April she departed San Francisco, California to return to the Aleutians. Sailing with TF㺳, she steamed to Cold Bay, thence to Attu. On 11 May, she arrived off the latter, escorted landing craft into Massacre Bay, and then dispatched the boat waves. After the initial assault she took up anti-submarine and anti-aircraft patrols. Later shifting to Holtz Bay, she continued to perform patrol duties and to escort smaller craft from Amchitka and Adak until the end of the month.

On 6 June Pruitt returned to San Francisco and coastal escort duties. Through the summer she steamed along the coast from Alaska to Southern California and in September got underway for the Solomon Islands. At the end of October, she arrived at Purvis Bay, Florida Island, whence she steamed to Bougainville.

Taking on mines at Acre, New Hebrides, she planted mines along Bougainville's southern coast on the 2nd, 8th, and 24 November in support of operations on Cape Torokina, then in December shifted to escort assignments between and among the Solomons, New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and the Societies.

Pruitt returned to San Francisco on 18 July 1944, underwent overhaul, and in October sailed back to Pearl Harbor where she began submarine training operations. Detached toward the end of November, she patrolled off Midway from 29 November – 15 January 1945. On 22 January she resumed operations with the Training Command, Submarine Force and for the remainder of World War II trained submarines southwest of Oahu.

Redesignated AG–101 on 5 June 1945, she was ordered inactivated three months later, and on 21 September she sailed east, arriving at Philadelphia in October.


USS Truxtun Association

USS Truxtun (DD-229) was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was the third ship named for Thomas Truxtun.

Truxtun was laid down on 3 December 1919 and launched on 28 September 1920 from William Cramp & Sons, sponsored by Miss Isabelle Truxtun Brumby, and commissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 16 February 1921, Lieutenant Commander Melville S. Brown in command.

Upon commissioning, Truxtun completed shakedown and began duty along the east coast with the Atlantic Fleet as a unit of Division 39, Destroyer Squadron 3. She operated with that unit along the Atlantic seaboard until the fall when she was reassigned to Division 43, Squadron 15. During the winter of 1921 and 1922, the destroyer joined the fleet in maneuvers and exercises near Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Asiatic Fleet: In March 1922, Division 43 returned north to Newport, Rhode Island, to prepare for service in the Asiatic Fleet. On 22 June 1922, Truxtun departed Newport and proceeded, via the Mediterranean, the Suez Canal, and the Indian Ocean, to the Far East which she reached in mid-August. By early September, she and several sister destroyers of Division 43 joined the main elements of the Asiatic Fleet off Chefoo on the northern coast of China. Late in October, the fleet headed south to its winter base at Manila in the Philippines, from whence it conducted exercises until the following spring.

Truxtun served with the Asiatic Fleet for the next 10 years. During that decade, she alternated summer cruises in Chinese waters with winter maneuvers in the Philippines. This routine was punctuated by special unusual assignments. For instance, in June 1924, she and the other five destroyers of Division 43 helped to form a chain of picket ships across the Yellow Sea for the Army's global flight. More often, however, internecine warfare in China brought Truxtun to the coast of that troubled nation to protect American lives and property. She spent a total of eight out of the 13 months between September 1926 and October 1927 patrolling the Yangtze River while competing factions in China fought one another - and occasionally otherwise neutral third parties. The destroyer returned to the Yangtze River Patrol twice more - from 1 March to 14 April 1930 and from January through March 1932 - when internal political convulsions in China threatened foreign lives and property.

On 18 April 1932, Truxtun departed Manila and the Asiatic Fleet to join the destroyers attached to the Battle Force. After stops at Guam, Midway, and Hawaii, she reached Mare Island Navy Yard on 13 May. For the next seven years, she patrolled the Pacific, as far north as Alaska and as far south as the Panama Canal, participating in maneuvers with capital ships of the Battle Force. Only once, in 1934, did she leave the Pacific. On 9 April, she cleared San Diego and transited the Panama Canal. After calling at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Truxtun steamed north to New York City, arriving on 31 May. Following that visit, she patrolled the eastern seaboard. On 15 September, the destroyer stood out of Hampton Roads, re-transited the canal, and returned to San Diego on 9 November to resume operations with the Battle Force.

World War II - Transfer to Atlantic Squadron: On 27 April 1939, Truxtun steamed out of San Diego and headed for the canal once more. She reached Norfolk, Virginia on 15 May and joined Destroyer Division 27, Atlantic Squadron. The destroyer patrolled the east coast of the United States while war clouds gathered in Europe. Soon after the outbreak of war in September, Truxtun began enforcing the provisions of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's proclamation of American neutrality by conducting neutrality patrols and escort duty off the Atlantic coast, in the Gulf of Mexico, and in the Caribbean. In late May and early June 1940, the warship made a voyage to Casablanca in French North Africa and then resumed neutrality patrols off Florida and in the Caribbean.

Following repairs at Norfolk in December 1940 and January 1941, Truxtun cleared Hampton Roads on 6 February. The next day, she reached Newport, Rhode Island, where she joined Destroyer Division 63, Squadron 31. Between late February and mid-March, she made two voyages to Halifax, Nova Scotia, returning to the United States at the Washington Navy Yard on both occasions. On 15 March, the destroyer returned to Newport and resumed patrols and exercises.

NavSource Naval History Photographs.

A Sad Ending: (From DEAD RECKONING: The Pollux-Truxtun Disaster) On February 15, 1942, Truxtun departed Boston for Argentia, Newfoundland, where a large US air-naval base existed. As it steamed north, a violent winter storm developed and pelted the destroyer with gale-force winds, giant waves, and blowing sleet. Visibility was zero and strong ocean currents pushed the Truxtun dangerously close to Newfoundland's rocky coastline. At 4:10 in the morning of February 18, the destroyer went aground in Chambers Cove, on the island's south coast. Jagged rocks pierced the destroyer's hull and powerful waves began to break it apart.

The 156 men onboard spent the coming hours in a desperate struggle for survival. Many crew members were young - between the ages of 18 and 25 - and had only joined the Navy during the last two months, following Japan's surprise attack against Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Also present were veteran sailors, such as the ship's captain, Lieutenant Commander Ralph Hickox. Sadly, most men onboard the Truxtun died that day in Chambers Cove while trying to cross the raging waters that separated them from land. Dozens of sailors jumped into the water only to be swept out to sea or dashed against the jagged rocks and tall cliffs lining the coastline. Others made it to shore, but then froze to death in the howling wind and blowing sleet. In the end, 110 men died and 46 survived.

Those who lived did so because of their own resilience and bravery, and also because of the selfless heroism displayed by residents from the nearby mining town of St. Lawrence. These men and women spent hours pulling American sailors from the ocean, transporting them to safety, and nursing them back to health until the Navy picked them up the following day.

A second vessel, the USS Pollux, was traveling in convoy with the Truxtun when it also went aground on February 18. Of the 233 men onboard that vessel, 93 died. Together, the Pollux-Truxtun disaster is considered one of the worst in United States naval history.

A documentary video of the Pollux-Truxtun Disaster may be viewed HERE.


USS Pruitt DD–347(AG–101)

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Contents

During the interwar period, Pruitt operated in the Western Pacific, protecting American interests in the Far East. She was converted to a light minelayer and accordingly redesignated DM-22 on 30 June 1937. LTJG Richard O'Kane, who would be awarded the Medal of Honor as the most successful U.S. submarine officer of World War II, served aboard Pruitt from 1935 through shipyard conversion to a minelayer. Ώ]

A unit of Mine Division 1, she was undergoing overhaul at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 7 December 1941, with future Rear Admiral George Stephen Morrison on board. At 07:53, Japanese planes flew over the base at low altitude and within minutes some of Pruitt ' s crew had sprinted to other ships and fired their first bullets. Others manned fire hoses and helped distribute ammunition during the attack on Pearl Harbor. At the end of January 1942, Pruitt completed overhaul and took up offshore patrol and minelaying duties with the Hawaiian Sea Frontier. Continuing operations there into June, she sailed, on the 19th, for Bremerton, Washington, from where she steamed to the Aleutian Islands for minelaying operations and escort assignments out of Kodiak. Into the fall she continued operations in the Aleutians, interrupted by regular runs back to the Hawaiian Islands, and then took up escort duties along the west coast.

With the new year, 1943, Pruitt shifted south and trained with the 4th Marine Raider Battalion off Southern California. Further escort assignments followed and on 24 April she departed San Francisco, California to return to the Aleutians. Sailing with TF㺳, she steamed to Cold Bay, thence to Attu. On 11 May, she arrived off the latter, escorted landing craft into Massacre Bay, and then dispatched the boat waves. After the initial assault she took up anti-submarine and anti-aircraft patrols. Later shifting to Holtz Bay, she continued to perform patrol duties and to escort smaller craft from Amchitka and Adak until the end of the month.

On 6 June Pruitt returned to San Francisco and coastal escort duties. Through the summer she steamed along the coast from Alaska to Southern California and in September got underway for the Solomon Islands. At the end of October, she arrived at Purvis Bay, Florida Island, whence she steamed to Bougainville.

Taking on mines at Acre, New Hebrides, she planted mines along Bougainville's southern coast on the 2nd, 8th, and 24 November in support of operations on Cape Torokina, then in December shifted to escort assignments between and among the Solomons, New Hebrides, New Caledonia, and the Societies.

Pruitt returned to San Francisco on 18 July 1944, underwent overhaul, and in October sailed back to Pearl Harbor where she began submarine training operations. Detached toward the end of November, she patrolled off Midway from 29 November – 15 January 1945. On 22 January she resumed operations with the Training Command, Submarine Force and for the remainder of World War II trained submarines southwest of Oahu.

Redesignated AG–101 on 5 June 1945, she was ordered inactivated three months later, and on 21 September she sailed east, arriving at Philadelphia in October.


USS Pruitt

Launching of the USS Pruitt (DD-347) at Bath Iron Works in Maine August 2, 1920.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Center

Time Period

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Pruitt DD-347 - History

Historical Sketch of USS Zane (DD-337)

DD-337 was named for Marine Corps officer Randolph Talcott Zane, (1887-1918) who served in the Chateau Thierry region of France during World War I. Wounded and shell-shocked on 26 June, Zane never recovered from his injuries and died on 24 October 1918. Zane was commissioned at Mare Island on 15 February 1921. Converted from a destroyer to a high-speed minesweeper at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard and reclassified as DMS-14 on 19 November 1940, Zane operated primarily in Hawaiian waters on the eve of World War II.

On the morning of 7 December 1941, she was moored off Pearl City in a nest with her three sister ships of Mine Division 4 Trever (DMS-16), Wasmuth (DMS-15), and Perry (DMS-17). The crew was just finishing breakfast when, at 0757, a signalman on watch topside observed a single plane drop a bomb on the southern end of Ford Island after a long gliding approach from the northward. Only then did the men topside realize it was a Japanese plane. With 10 percent of her enlisted men and 25 percent of the officers ashore, Zane went to general quarters and, within three minutes of the initial explosion, had manned her .50-caliber antiaircraft machine gun battery. Her commanding officer, Lt. Comdr. L. M. LeHardy, was senior officer afloat in the division and reported: "0800 Observed Japanese plane gliding low over Ford Island, enemy character now positive. This was not a drill." Commencing fire at "any and all planes which passed within a reasonable distance of the nest," Zane began preparations at 0803 for getting underway, as belting and ammunition supply parties turned to. At 0830, Zane spotted a "strange submarine" 200 yards astern of Medusa (AR-1), anchored in nearby berth K-23. Zane's position in the nest, however, rendered her incapable of opening fire with her after 4-inch gun her aim was fouled by Perry (DMS-17), moored outboard. However, Monaghan (DD-354) soon made the whole problem academic at 0840, when she charged down upon the Japanese type "A" midget submarine and destroyed her by ramming and with depth charges. Meanwhile, the fleet gradually began to fight back and, by the time the second wave of Japanese planes arrived, the enemy found a decidedly hot reception. Gunfire from a nearby ship possibly Medusa brought down one Japanese plane, whose bomb burst in the water near Perry . The enemy aircraft exploded into flames on the way down and crashed on shore to the loud cheers of all hands topside in Zane. Subsequently, the ships of MinDiv 4 got underway individually and stood out to take up patrol offshore. Zane had suffered no damage from the enemy during the raid, but the melee of "friendly" anti-aircraft fire from a number of ships nearby including some in the nest itself had severed a number of strands of rigging and antennae. At 1410, Zane and Wasmuth rigged up a twin-ship, moored-mine sweep with 400 fathoms of wire between them and entered the Pearl Harbor entrance channel at 1547, sweeping up to the vicinity of the gate vessel before the sweep wire parted.

Subsequently returning to sea, Zane resumed anti-submarine patrols, carrying them out at a time when submarine sightings most of them fictitious proliferated. Zane operated locally out of Pearl Harbor into the spring of 1942 as a convoy escort. The high-speed minesweeper then underwent repairs and alterations and together with her four sister ships was re-assigned to remove mines prior to the Guadalcanal invasions before D day, 7 August. During the struggle for Guadalcanal, Zane worked off Tulagi and Guadalcanal frequently battling Japanese forces the end of 1942. She later took part in the campaigns to occupy the Russells, New Georgia, in 1942, and the Marshalls, Marianas and Carolines in 1944. V-J Day found her in at anchor in San Pedro Bay, off Leyte. During those vital but unglamorous duties, she had been reclassified from a high-speed minesweeper to a miscellaneous auxiliary, AG-109, on 5 June 1945.

Zane was decommissioned there on 14 December 1945 and sold on 22 October 1946 her hulk was scrapped on 3 March 1947. Zane (DMS-14) received six battle stars for her World War II service. In addition, she received the Navy Unit Commendation for her services at Guadalcanal in 1942 and 1943


Pruitt DD-347 - History

It began as a housing marvel. Two decades later, it ended in rubble. But what happened to those caught in between?

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home.

The world-famous image of its implosion has helped to perpetuate a myth of failure, a failure that has been used to critique Modernist architecture, attack public assistance programs, and stigmatize public housing residents.

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth seeks to set the historical record straight. To examine the interests involved in Pruitt-Igoe’s creation. To re-evaluate the rumors and the stigma. To implode the myth.

Public housing has a bad name.

Although the reasons for this are complex, a few widely publicized housing projects have created a lasting negative impression in the minds of many Americans. One such project is the Pruitt-Igoe public housing development in St. Louis, Missouri. A famous image, circulated worldwide, of the implosion of one of Pruitt-Igoe’s buildings has come to symbolize the failure of government-sponsored housing and, more broadly, government-sponsorship at large.

Completed in 1954, the 33 11-story buildings of Pruitt-Igoe were billed as the solution to the overcrowding and deterioration that plagued inner city St. Louis.

Twenty years later, the buildings were leveled, declared unfit for habitation.

What happened in Pruitt-Igoe has fueled a mythology repeated in discussions of many urban high-rise projects. Violence, crime, and drugs, so the story goes, plagued the housing project from nearly the beginning as it became a “dumping ground” for the poorest city residents. According to one standard account, it was quickly torn apart by its residents who could not adapt to high-rise city life.

Widely circulated images of Pruitt-Igoe reveal this legacy. Vandalized hallways. Acres of broken windows. A building imploded. These images of destruction are periodically interrupted by images of a different kind: hopeful images of a massive, newly-built housing complex in the mid-fifties, the scale and grandeur of the buildings reflecting the optimistic spirit out of which Pruitt-Igoe came.

The quick, unexamined transition from hope to disillusionment is the standard structure of the Pruitt-Igoe narrative. But there is another Pruitt-Igoe story, another approach.

It is a story of a city and its residents. A city in many ways at the forefront of postwar urban decline. In the years of Pruitt-Igoe, St. Louis lost half of its population and most of its prestige in less than a generation. An analysis of Pruitt-Igoe has to begin in this milieu, and yet it so rarely does.

A more thorough examination of Pruitt-Igoe should take into account the ways in which public housing was used as a tool for racial segregation and as a justification for the clearance of poor and working-class neighborhoods. It should look at the dominant culture of the time, which stressed uniformity and “hygiene” in the domestic sphere, political life, and neighborhood composition. It should question the priorities of the legislation that created large-scale public housing but failed to adequately fund it.

The individual stories of the residents’ struggles and successes have almost universally been ignored the texture of life in the projects too often reduced to melodrama. The Pruitt-Igoe Myth has, at its heart, the experiences of its residents, adding a human face to a subject that has become so depersonalized.

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth tells of a declining city a suburbanizing nation a changing urban economy a hope for the future and residents who fought back in their own ways, refusing to be passive victims of these larger forces aligned against them.

The documentary has two goals. One is to inform and enhance the ongoing debate over public housing and government welfare programs. The film uses Pruitt-Igoe as a lens through which a larger story about affordable housing and the changing American city can be viewed. It untangles the various arguments about what went wrong in Pruitt-Igoe and dispels the over-simplifications and stereotypes that turned Pruitt-Igoe into a symbol of failure. Second, the film illustrates how conclusions are dangerously and erroneously drawn when powerful interests control debate.

History is a contested space. Arguments become flattened, rather than expanded, available evidence discarded, rather than sought.

This is why Pruitt-Igoe matters – why we made this documentary. So much of our collective understanding of cities and government and inequality are tied up in these 33 high-rise buildings, informed by the demolition image. Too much of the context has been overlooked, or willfully ignored, in discussions of public housing, public welfare, and the state of the American city.

It’s time to get the facts straight and present the Pruitt-Igoe story in a way that will implode the myths and the stigma. Pruitt-Igoe needs to be remembered and understood in a different way than it has been.

The city will change again, and affordable housing will continue to be an issue. When that happens, the complex lessons of Pruitt-Igoe must be remembered by society and by the architects, developers, and public officials we will task with solving future housing issues.


History


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Established in 1981, D&D Elevator Maintenance, Inc. has been providing best maintenance practices throughout the New York metropolitan area for over 38 years.

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Over the years, D&D has achieved several industry milestones, including the first AC gearless machine installation in North America. This state-of-the-art equipment has already given the customer over 20 years of reliable operation and remains in service today. In 2001, we introduced our &ldquoEngineered Elevator Service Plan.&rdquo This concept was based on new code requirements being adopted by the State and City of New York, complying with Section 8.6 of the A17.1 Code for elevators and escalators.

In 2002, Robert partnered with the National Association of Elevator Contractors to develop an industry-wide Certification program for the education and training of field technicians. This program is now being used for both training and licensing by over 80 elevator companies nationwide.

In 2003, D & D obtained approval of its &ldquoCertified Elevator Technician&rdquo (CET) program from both the Federal and State Department of Labor. D&D is currently the only merit shop Contractor in the State of New York to offer Apprenticeship training to its employees.

In 2011, the CET program was awarded accreditation by both ANSI and ISO for meeting its standards for certification programs.


Watch the video: 1966 MUSTANG 347 STROKER SUPERCHARGED (December 2021).