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St.Michael's Row Chester

St.Michael's Row Chester


The retail listing at St Michaels Row, Chester CH1 1EF is no longer advertised on Realla

Location Chester is a historic cathedral city that benefits from a large wealthy catchment as well as a steady influx of tourists all year round. The unit occupies a good location in the 200,000 sqftGrosvenor Centre which is anchored by Debenhams with other retailers including H&M, Schuh, TK Maxx and Top Shop. The subject unit is located close to.

  • Atrium
  • Food court
  • Property manager on site
  • Security system
  • Energy Performance Rating - E

St Michaels Row, Chester CH1 1EF

2 months ago. Knight Frank LLP

22-24 Eastgate St, Chester

The property is situated in a prime position on Eastgate Street, adjacent to Jo Malone and close to the newly opened Flannels with other retailers in the near vicinity including Fat Face, Penhaligons, Caffe Nero, Hobbs and Debenhams.

22-24 Eastgate St, Chester CH1 1LE

16 days ago. Emanuel Oliver Ltd

30 Eastgate Row S, Chester

The premises occupy an excellent position on Row Level, adjacent to Jack Wills and Mappin & Webb and other retailers in the near vicinity include Waterstones and Flannels.

30 Eastgate Row S, Chester CH1 1LF

3 days ago. Emanuel Oliver Ltd

25-29 Bridge St, Chester

Chester is one of the strongest retailing centres in the North West and the commercial and administrative centre of Cheshire. The city is also an important tourist destination that benefits greatly from its historic Roman origins, creating a unique shopping environment. 25 Bridge Street Row occupies a strong trading position on Row Level close to.

25-29 Bridge St, Chester CH1 1NG

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St.Michael's Row Chester - History

St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church

Edgmont Ave. above 7th St.
Chester, PA

In 1993, St. Michael's, along with five other Chester Roman Catholic churches, were merged into the Saint Katharine Drexel parish.

The following records for this church were acquired and copied by Helen M. (Webber) Imburgia for the Delaware County Historical Society in 1986-1987:

Book I Baptisms 1841 - 1845 & 1845 - 1867
Marriages 1846 - 1866
Confirmations 1845 - 1860
Book II Baptisms 1865 - 1883
Marriages 1867 - 1883
Confirmations 1873 - 1879 & 1893 - 1920
Book III Baptisms 1884 - 1906
Marriages 1884 - 1906

If you have any information and or pictures that you would like to contribute about the history of this church, please forward it to [email protected]

Rev. Arthur P. Haviland
(ordained June 29, 1850)
First Resident Pastor: 1850-1877
Died: May 22, 1886

Rev. James Timmins
(ordained July 6, 1871)
Pastor: 1878-1911, 1917-1929
Died: April 24, 1929

Rev. Joseph Timmins
(ordained January 31, 1886)
Pastor: 1911-1917
Died: July 15, 1917

Rev. Edward F. X. Curran
(ordained June 16, 1903)
Pastor: 1929-1936
Died: July 15, 1943

Rev. Joseph M. O'Hara, Ph.D.
(ordained May 29, 1909)
Pastor: 1936-1956
Pastor Emeritus: 1956-1963
Died: September 15, 1963

Rev. Msgr. Francis A. Higgins
(ordained May 29, 1930)
Pastor: 1963-1977
Pastor Emeritus: 1977-1988
Died: May 11, 1988

Rev. William J. Benonis
(ordained May 10, 1952)
Pastor 1977-1982
Later Pastor of Notre Dame de Lourdes, Swarthmore, PA

Rev. Richard T. Powers
(ordained May 18, 1963)
Pastor: 1982-1983
Later Pastor of Incarnation, Philadelphia, PA

Rev. Raymond J. Himsworth
(ordained May 19, 1962)
Pastor: 1983-1990
Later Pastor of St. James, Elkins Park, PA

Rev. Michael J. Ryan
(ordained May 20, 1972)
Pastor: 1989-through the 150th anniversary in 1992


The Rev. John J. McKenna, assistant Rector until 1925
The Rev. David J. Kane, assistant Rector 1925-
The Rev. John F. Resch, assistant Rector 1949

2/7/2006:
Rev. Thomas J. Corrigan (Later Monsignor Thomas J. Corrigan) was ordained on May 22, 1937 - NOT 1940.
Thank you.
His Nephew,
Stephen Corrigan

Rev. Francis N. McDevitt, ordained 1941
Rev. James F. Soreth, ordained 1941
Rev. Paul J. Carey, ordained 1942
Rev. William Mooney, ordained 1943
Rev. Joseph F Sikora, ordained 1943
Rev. Arthur W. Nugent, ordained 1947
Rev. John F. Fahy, ordained 1948
Rev. James B. Sheridan, ordained 1950
Rev. George A. Gormley, ordained 1954
Rev. Joseph T. Kane, ordained 1962
Rev. Joseph J. Gallagher, ordained 1963
Rev. Gerald A. Kelleher, ordained 1963
Rev. James McCusker, ordained 1964

Rev. Bartholemew P. Fair, ordained 1940
Professor, St. James High School

Rev. Francis M. Egan, ordained 1945
Professor, St. James High School

Rev. Michael C. Picard ordained 1966
Professor, Cardinal O'Hara High School

Rev. Michael J. Flood, ordained 1968
Professor, Cardinal O'Hara High School

Louis J. Warfel, [email protected], has transcribed the complete text of Rev. Joseph M. O'Hara, PH.D.'s Chester's Century of Catholicism 1842-1942 for us. Please see that work for a more complete history of the first 100 years of St. Michael's church.

"The Catholic Church of "St. Michael the Archangel," at Chester, owes its foundation to a number of Irish Catholics employed in Judge Leiper’s quarries, who having no place of worship nearer than the church on Dennis Kelley’s property at Cobbs Creek, or James Willcox’s Chapel at "Ivy Mills," about nine miles distant, agreed among themselves to contribute towards the erection of a church building more convenient and for the purpose of obtaining the aid of a Catholic Priest to organize a congregation among them, they applied to the Rt. Rev. Bishop Kendrick of Philadelphia, who appointed the Rev. Father Sheriden, now the venerable pastor of St. Paul’s Church in that city, to attend them. Under his direction and guidance, a lot was purchased in Chester for the purpose of erecting thereon a new church for their accommodation. The corner stone was laid Sept. 29, 1842, and on June 25, 1843, the church was dedicated to Almighty God, under the patronage of St. Michael the Archangel, in the presence of a very large assembly from Philadelphia and the surrounding country. This structure is of stone from Leiper’s quarries on Crum Creek, of the Gothic style of architecture, 42 by 72 feet, with a square tower, and spire 100 feet high, surmounted by a gilt cross. In the tower is hung a fine toned bell, 1000 pounds in weight, which is rung twice a day. A sacristy, 12 by 22 feet, has been erected adjoining the church on the south side.

"A parsonage, 34 feet square and three stories high, was erected on the church lot by the present pastor, the Rev. Arthur Peter Haviland, who, with his assistant, the Rev. Hugh McGlinn, reside therein. An additional lot adjoining the church property, was purchased in 1866, and on it in 1871, was erected a parochial school-house, 60 by 24 feet, and two stories high, capable of accommodating 500 children. It is used for a Sunday School, with about 300 scholars in attendance, and as a day school for male and female children on separate floors, under the care of two teachers. The average attendance is 180 scholars. The expense of supporting both schools is defrayed by the congregation.

"The congregation of St. Michael’s when its first resident pastor, the Rev. Arthur P. Haviland, was appointed, July 12, 1850, numbered about 250 now, owing to the rapid increase of the population of Chester, it is somewhat more than 2000, for whose accommodation there are four services on Sunday, to be continued until a large church will be erected, for which arrangements are already made.

"Since writing the above, the old church edifice, so long a marked feature of Chester, has been torn down, and a more imposing, spacious and commodious building is in the course of erection on the site of the old structure, and is rapidly approaching completion. The corner stone of the new church was laid on Nov. 1, 1874, by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Wood, with appropriate ceremonies. The cost of the new church will be about $70,000. The height of the tower from the ground, of stone, will be 96 ft., upon this there will be a wooden spire of 84 ft., making a total height of 180 feet. The length of the building will be 167 ft., breadth 67 ft. The basement has been finished and occupied for about two years (1877). The masonry and stonecutting of the new church are being done by Ramsden Rawnsley. The erection being made under the direction of the Rev. Mr. Haviland, the pastor.

. " Previous to the installation of the resident pastor, clergymen from Philadelphia officiated as temporary Missionaries at St. Michael’s, among whom may be mentioned Rev. Thaddeus Amat, the Principal of the Theological Seminary of St. Charles Borromeo, Philadelphia, now Bishop of Monterey, California also, Rev. Dr. O’Hara, now Bishop of Scranton, Pa., the congregation being small and not able to support a resident pastor."

The "Old St. Michael's Catholic Club" was founded in December 1947 in the club auditorium at 8th & Edgmont Ave.

Note: This building now houses the St. John A.U.M.P. Church

A good source of information would be:

PHILADELPHIA ARCHDIOCESEAN HISTORICAL RESEARCH CENTER
(610-667-2125)
FAX 610-667-2730
Thanks to David Andrews

When Fr. Sikora was transferred, Fr. Joseph Kane became moderator of the altar boys. Fr. Kane was one of the most popular priests (along with Fr. Dunion) ever to serve at St. Michael's. He came to the parish in May of 1962, a newly-ordained priest fresh out of the seminary. He's now a Monsignor, and pastor of St. Robert Bellarmine parish in Warrington, Pa. We still keep in touch. Outside of my family, Fr. Kane was one of the three people who I consider to have been most influential in my life.

Fr. John Dunion, although only "in residence" at St. Michael's while a teacher at St. James, and later at Cardinal O'Hara high school, was as popular as any priest the parish ever had. Everyone was saddened when he passed away suddenly in August of 1967.

Fr. Francis Higgins, who was eventually named a Monsignor, was the pastor. I remember he always said the 8:00 AM Mass on weekdays. I also remember the day I dropped the missal and bookstand while serving Mass for him, just missing his foot.

One priest who you omitted from your list was Fr. James Rodgers. He was only at St. Michael's for a few months during the summer of 1964. Fr. James McCusker was supposed to be Fr. Kane's replacement when he was transferred in the spring of 1964, but he had been sent to Puerto Rico to learn Spanish because of the increasing number of Hispanic parishioners. So Fr. Rodgers was sent to St. Michael's until Fr. McCusker finished his studies in September. Fr. Rodgers was notorious for oversleeping --- not a good thing for a priest assigned to say the early Mass. I can remember serving one 6:30 AM weekday Mass celebrated by Fr. Rodgers that didn't start until almost 7:15 AM. He was definitely not a morning person.

Thanks for providing this opportunity to recall so many memories from years ago. Perhaps some of my former classmates will read this and add their own memories of a great parish. St. Mike's may be closed now, but it will never be forgotten."

"My great-great grandfather was one of the stone mason's that built St. Michael's Church. He lost an eye from a stone chip while building the church."


Area Information for St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EL

Our information is available for almost all UK postcodes. Why not take a look at some of these other postcodes in the immediate vicinity of St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EL:

About the Demographic Information

The information on housing, people, culture, employment and education that is displayed about St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EL is based on the last census performed in the UK in 2011. They are performed once every 10 years. Please note: census information may include figures for adjacent streets and postcodes. The figures are therefore representative of the local area, not a specific street address or row of houses. The census collection is designed so that each group of postcodes should contain at least 100 people (50 in Scotland). This is done to preserve the anonymity of the people in that area, as some postcodes cover a very small area, sometimes a single building. You can see the area covered by the census statistics by clicking "Show Census Area Covered" below the map above.

Using this Information Commercially

The information we provide on the website is done so without charge. However, if you wish to use this data on other websites, or in any other public medium should consult our data sources page for information on how you should correctly attribute the information.

House Prices

There have been no house sales reported to the Land Registry in this postcode since January 1st 1995.

Our data comes directly from the Land Registry, and is updated monthly. It does not include commercial sales, or sales of land without property.

Housing Types Embed This

The area containing St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester consists predominantly of terraced housing, which is common in suburban and inner-city areas. Please note that the figures may include adjacent streets - see the Summary tab for an explanation and map of the area that these figures cover.

Housing Types
Detached 3
Semi-Detached 4
Terraced 95
Flat (Purpose-Built) 51
Flat (Converted) 14
Residence in Commercial Building 23
Total 190
Are these numbers higher than you expected? Click here for explanation.

Housing Tenure Embed This Back to Top

The area containing St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester contains a higher than average level of rented housing (excluding social housing) - 40% of household spaces. This contrasts with the national average of just over 16%.

Housing Tenure
Owned Outright 31
Owned with Mortgage 31
Shared Ownership 0
Rented: From Council 8
Rented: Other Social inc. charities and housing associations 23
Rented: Private Landlord inc. letting agents 63
Rented: Other 1
Rent Free 4
Total 161

Housing Occupancy Embed This Back to Top

This data lists the total number of residents normally resident within each household. The figures do not record under- or over-occupancy.

Housing Occupancy
One Person 75
Two People 65
Three People 14
Four People 5
Five People 2
Six People 0
Seven People 0
8+ People 0
Total 161

Social Grade Embed This

Social Grade approximations are derived from an algorithm created by the Market Research Society. The figures shown are per-household rather than individual - more specifically, the job title and employer of the "household reference person" is used, analogous to what traditionally was called the head of the household. Only household reference persons between the ages of 16-64 are included.

Social Grade
AB - Higher and intermediate managerial, administrative, or professional positions 48
C1 - Supervisory, clerical, and junior managerial/administrative/professional positions 39
C2 - Skilled manual workers 15
DE - Semi-skilled and unskilled manual workers those on state benefit/unemployed, & lowest grade workers 25
Total 127

Gender Embed This Back to Top

Across the UK as a whole, the gender split is roughly equal at 49% male, 51% female. This address in City of Chester constituency is broadly in line with those figures, with 54% male.

Age Groups Embed This Back to Top

Across the UK as a whole, the median age is 39. In general, inner city areas show high concentrations of people aged 18-30, suburbs show larger numbers of small children and adults aged 30-50, and rural and small towns are more popular with older workers and retirees. Many poorer areas lack a majority age group, which is due in part to the people in that area being constrained by circumstance rather than being able to choose where to retire, raise a family or grow up.

Age Groups
0-4 6
5-7 2
8-9 2
10-14 2
15 1
16-17 2
18-19 25
20-24 31
25-29 45
30-44 81
45-59 58
60-64 17
65-74 30
75-84 19
85-89 3
90+ 0
Total 324

Relationship Status Embed This Back to Top

In the immediate vicinity of CH1 1EL there is a large concentration of residents that are single - 52% of the resident population. On average, around 35% of census respondents were single. Areas with large single populations are often in built-up areas, with good entertainment facilities. It is also common to see a younger population in these areas.

Figures for relationship status do not include those aged under 16, or those family members aged 16-18 who are in full-time education.

Relationship Status
Single 169
Married 82
Divorced 41
Separated 10
Widowed 7
Same Sex 2
Total 311

Health Embed This Back to Top

Health in the UK is strongly tied to age as you would expect, but the affluence of a neighbourhood also has strong influence, with deprived areas often showing poorer standards of health.

Overall, the UK considers itself to be healthy - 81.1% of residents rated their health as Very Good or Good. The full breakdown is as follows for the United Kingdom: 47.1% Very Good, 34% Good, 13.3% Fair, 4.3% Bad and 1.3% Very Bad.

Education & Qualifications Embed This Back to Top

At the time of the 2011 census, across the UK 22.9% of residents had no qualification, 13.2% had 1-4 GCSEs, 15.2% had 5+ GCSEs and 1-2 A/AS-Levels, 12.3% had 2+ A-Levels, 27.1% had a degree (or similar), and 3.6% had an apprenticeship.

The qualification levels are based on current qualification names. The former Ordinary Levels (O-Levels) and CSEs will be included in the GCSE figures. Former Higher School Certificates (HSCs) will be counted as A Levels.

Highest Qualification Level Achieved
Degree or Similar e.g. professional qualification (accountancy etc) 114
Apprenticeship 3
HNC, HND or 2+ A Levels 59
5+ GCSEs, an A-Level or 1-2 AS Levels 34
1-4 GCSEs or Equivalent 28
No GCSEs or Equivalent 51
Other 22
Total 311

Ethnic Group Embed This

This address (St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester) can be considered less ethnically diverse than the UK average. As whole, the UK population claims itself as approximately 86% white, with residents of this area being 96% so.

As a country with a diverse population, the UK is home to other sizable ethnic groups, with mixed ethnicity (2.1%), Indian (2.4%) and Pakistani (1.9%) being the largest groups reported.

There is considerable division of ethnicities within the UK, with ethnically diverse addresses uncommon outside of urban areas.

Ethnic Group
White 311
Mixed Ethnicity 2
Indian 7
Chinese 1
Other Asian 2
Other 1
Total 324

Country of Birth Embed This Back to Top

At the time of the 2011 census, approximately 83.5% of the resident population of England were born in England. The other groups were 1% Welsh, 1.35% Scottish, 0.4% Northern Irish, 0.75% from the Republic of Ireland, 3.75% from other European Union countries, and 9.4% from outside of Europe, with the remainder not stated.

Country of Birth
England 244
Wales 26
Scotland 9
Northern Ireland 5
Republic of Ireland 3
European Union 20
Other 17
Total 324

Passport(s) Held Embed This Back to Top

Note that an individual may hold one or more passports. The data may include people living in adjacent addresses to CH1 1EL

Passport(s) Held
United Kingdom 250
Republic of Ireland 6
Europe (including European Union) 20
African Countries 0
Middle East or Asia 6
North America or Caribbean 0
Central America 0
South America 0
Oceania (Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia and nearby islands) 0
None 43

Religion Embed This Back to Top

England and Wales are primarily Christian countries, with 59.3% of residents Christian. However, a sizeable portion of the population (25.1%) claim to have no religion. Some 4.8% identify themselves as Muslim, 1.5% Hindu, 0.4% Buddhist, 0.5% Jewish, 0.8% Sikh, and 0.4% as other religions, while the remaining 7.2% did not state their religious views.

Religion
Christian 186
No Religion 113
Buddhist 1
Hindu 4
Jewish 0
Muslim 1
Sikh 1
Other Religion 1
Not Stated 17
Total 324

Economic Activity Embed This

Figures for economic activity do not include those aged under 16, or those family members aged 16-18 who are in full-time education. This data is therefore based on 42.4 million of the United Kingdom's 57.8 million residents. The data was correct as of the 2011 census, which was a period of depressed economic activity.

Economic Activity
Full-Time Employee 122
Part-Time Employee (defined as 30 hours or less per week) 24
Self Employed 32
Unemployed 19
Full-Time Student (with or without job) 38
Retired 23
Looking After Home or Family 4
Long-Term Sick or Disabled 23
Other 4
Total 289

Employment Industry Embed This Back to Top

This data is based on resident aged 16-74 on census day 2011, who were in employment.

Employment Industry
Mining/Quarrying 1
Manufacturing 21
Water Supply Inc. Sewage and Waste Management 1
Construction 5
Retail Inc. Wholesale 33
Transportation Inc. Storage and Logistics 3
Accommodation and Food 31
Information and Communication 9
Financial Services Inc. Insurance 13
Real Estate 3
Professional, Scientific and Technical 18
Administration 7
Public Administration and Defence 7
Education 10
Health Inc. Social Work 12
Other Inc. Arts, Recreation etc. 12
Total 186

St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EL is within the Chester City policing neighbourhood, under the Cheshire Constabulary force area. For non-urgent queries, contact 101. For emergency assistance, please contact 999. In April 2021, 254 crimes were reported within half a mile of CH1 1EL.

Neighbourhood Team

Data courtesy of police.uk. See our Data Sources page for more information.

Key: Railway Station Hospital GP Dentist Optician Primary School Secondary School

Below are the details of the closest services to CH1 1EL. All distances are straightline distances, please consult the map of the facility to check the exact location. You can also view these details on our interactive services map for CH1 1EL.

Nearest Railway Stations

Listed here are the 20 closest railway stations to St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EL. The nearest railway station is Chester, approximately 0.7 miles away.

Name Approximate Distance*
Chester 0.7 miles
Bache 1.4 miles
Capenhurst 5.3 miles
Hawarden 5.9 miles
Hawarden Bridge 6.2 miles
Shotton 6.3 miles
Ellesmere Port 6.4 miles
Stanlow & Thornton 6.5 miles
Overpool 6.7 miles
Ince & Elton (Cheshire) 6.8 miles
Little Sutton 7 miles
Buckley 7.1 miles
Mouldsworth 7.2 miles
Penyffordd 7.5 miles
Helsby 7.7 miles
Hope (Flintshire) 7.9 miles
Caergwrle 8.2 miles
Hooton 8.3 miles
Cefn-y-Bedd 8.6 miles
Eastham Rake 9 miles

Nearest Primary Schools

Listed here are the 10 closest primary schools to St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EL. The nearest is The Grosvenor Park Church of England Academy, approximately 500 yards away.


Area Information for St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EF

Our information is available for almost all UK postcodes. Why not take a look at some of these other postcodes in the immediate vicinity of St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EF:

About the Demographic Information

The information on housing, people, culture, employment and education that is displayed about St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EF is based on the last census performed in the UK in 2011. They are performed once every 10 years. Please note: census information may include figures for adjacent streets and postcodes. The figures are therefore representative of the local area, not a specific street address or row of houses. The census collection is designed so that each group of postcodes should contain at least 100 people (50 in Scotland). This is done to preserve the anonymity of the people in that area, as some postcodes cover a very small area, sometimes a single building. You can see the area covered by the census statistics by clicking "Show Census Area Covered" below the map above.

Using this Information Commercially

The information we provide on the website is done so without charge. However, if you wish to use this data on other websites, or in any other public medium should consult our data sources page for information on how you should correctly attribute the information.

House Prices

There have been no house sales reported to the Land Registry in this postcode since January 1st 1995.

Our data comes directly from the Land Registry, and is updated monthly. It does not include commercial sales, or sales of land without property.

Housing Types Embed This

The area containing St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester consists predominantly of terraced housing, which is common in suburban and inner-city areas. Please note that the figures may include adjacent streets - see the Summary tab for an explanation and map of the area that these figures cover.

Housing Types
Detached 6
Semi-Detached 12
Terraced 94
Flat (Purpose-Built) 26
Flat (Converted) 26
Residence in Commercial Building 13
Total 177
Are these numbers higher than you expected? Click here for explanation.

Housing Tenure Embed This Back to Top

The area containing St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester contains a higher than average level of rented housing (excluding social housing) - 54% of household spaces. This contrasts with the national average of just over 16%.

Housing Tenure
Owned Outright 27
Owned with Mortgage 25
Shared Ownership 1
Rented: From Council 1
Rented: Other Social inc. charities and housing associations 7
Rented: Private Landlord inc. letting agents 75
Rented: Other 1
Rent Free 4
Total 141

Housing Occupancy Embed This Back to Top

This data lists the total number of residents normally resident within each household. The figures do not record under- or over-occupancy.

Housing Occupancy
One Person 67
Two People 61
Three People 12
Four People 1
Five People 0
Six People 0
Seven People 0
8+ People 0
Total 141

Social Grade Embed This

Social Grade approximations are derived from an algorithm created by the Market Research Society. The figures shown are per-household rather than individual - more specifically, the job title and employer of the "household reference person" is used, analogous to what traditionally was called the head of the household. Only household reference persons between the ages of 16-64 are included.

Social Grade
AB - Higher and intermediate managerial, administrative, or professional positions 39
C1 - Supervisory, clerical, and junior managerial/administrative/professional positions 39
C2 - Skilled manual workers 9
DE - Semi-skilled and unskilled manual workers those on state benefit/unemployed, & lowest grade workers 17
Total 104

Gender Embed This Back to Top

Across the UK as a whole, the gender split is roughly equal at 49% male, 51% female. This address in City of Chester constituency is broadly in line with those figures, with 52% male.

Age Groups Embed This Back to Top

Across the UK as a whole, the median age is 39. In general, inner city areas show high concentrations of people aged 18-30, suburbs show larger numbers of small children and adults aged 30-50, and rural and small towns are more popular with older workers and retirees. Many poorer areas lack a majority age group, which is due in part to the people in that area being constrained by circumstance rather than being able to choose where to retire, raise a family or grow up.

Age Groups
0-4 5
5-7 0
8-9 2
10-14 1
15 0
16-17 1
18-19 2
20-24 20
25-29 47
30-44 51
45-59 42
60-64 12
65-74 24
75-84 15
85-89 5
90+ 2
Total 229

Relationship Status Embed This Back to Top

In the immediate vicinity of CH1 1EF there is a large concentration of residents that are single - 50% of the resident population. On average, around 35% of census respondents were single. Areas with large single populations are often in built-up areas, with good entertainment facilities. It is also common to see a younger population in these areas.

Figures for relationship status do not include those aged under 16, or those family members aged 16-18 who are in full-time education.

Relationship Status
Single 115
Married 68
Divorced 19
Separated 5
Widowed 14
Same Sex 0
Total 221

Health Embed This Back to Top

Health in the UK is strongly tied to age as you would expect, but the affluence of a neighbourhood also has strong influence, with deprived areas often showing poorer standards of health.

Overall, the UK considers itself to be healthy - 81.1% of residents rated their health as Very Good or Good. The full breakdown is as follows for the United Kingdom: 47.1% Very Good, 34% Good, 13.3% Fair, 4.3% Bad and 1.3% Very Bad.

Education & Qualifications Embed This Back to Top

At the time of the 2011 census, across the UK 22.9% of residents had no qualification, 13.2% had 1-4 GCSEs, 15.2% had 5+ GCSEs and 1-2 A/AS-Levels, 12.3% had 2+ A-Levels, 27.1% had a degree (or similar), and 3.6% had an apprenticeship.

The qualification levels are based on current qualification names. The former Ordinary Levels (O-Levels) and CSEs will be included in the GCSE figures. Former Higher School Certificates (HSCs) will be counted as A Levels.

Highest Qualification Level Achieved
Degree or Similar e.g. professional qualification (accountancy etc) 102
Apprenticeship 4
HNC, HND or 2+ A Levels 28
5+ GCSEs, an A-Level or 1-2 AS Levels 21
1-4 GCSEs or Equivalent 23
No GCSEs or Equivalent 28
Other 15
Total 221

Ethnic Group Embed This

This address (St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester) can be considered less ethnically diverse than the UK average. As whole, the UK population claims itself as approximately 86% white, with residents of this area being 95% so.

As a country with a diverse population, the UK is home to other sizable ethnic groups, with mixed ethnicity (2.1%), Indian (2.4%) and Pakistani (1.9%) being the largest groups reported.

There is considerable division of ethnicities within the UK, with ethnically diverse addresses uncommon outside of urban areas.

Ethnic Group
White 218
Mixed Ethnicity 3
Bangladeshi 3
Chinese 2
Other Asian 2
Black Caribbean 1
Total 229

Country of Birth Embed This Back to Top

At the time of the 2011 census, approximately 83.5% of the resident population of England were born in England. The other groups were 1% Welsh, 1.35% Scottish, 0.4% Northern Irish, 0.75% from the Republic of Ireland, 3.75% from other European Union countries, and 9.4% from outside of Europe, with the remainder not stated.

Country of Birth
England 171
Wales 21
Scotland 2
Northern Ireland 1
Republic of Ireland 2
European Union 12
Other 20
Total 229

Passport(s) Held Embed This Back to Top

Note that an individual may hold one or more passports. The data may include people living in adjacent addresses to CH1 1EF

Passport(s) Held
United Kingdom 179
Republic of Ireland 0
Europe (including European Union) 12
African Countries 0
Middle East or Asia 3
North America or Caribbean 3
Central America 0
South America 2
Oceania (Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia and nearby islands) 1
None 31

Religion Embed This Back to Top

England and Wales are primarily Christian countries, with 59.3% of residents Christian. However, a sizeable portion of the population (25.1%) claim to have no religion. Some 4.8% identify themselves as Muslim, 1.5% Hindu, 0.4% Buddhist, 0.5% Jewish, 0.8% Sikh, and 0.4% as other religions, while the remaining 7.2% did not state their religious views.

Religion
Christian 129
No Religion 82
Buddhist 0
Hindu 0
Jewish 0
Muslim 1
Sikh 0
Other Religion 2
Not Stated 15
Total 229

Economic Activity Embed This

Figures for economic activity do not include those aged under 16, or those family members aged 16-18 who are in full-time education. This data is therefore based on 42.4 million of the United Kingdom's 57.8 million residents. The data was correct as of the 2011 census, which was a period of depressed economic activity.

Economic Activity
Full-Time Employee 97
Part-Time Employee (defined as 30 hours or less per week) 19
Self Employed 26
Unemployed 11
Full-Time Student (with or without job) 14
Retired 24
Looking After Home or Family 3
Long-Term Sick or Disabled 1
Other 4
Total 199

Employment Industry Embed This Back to Top

This data is based on resident aged 16-74 on census day 2011, who were in employment.

Employment Industry
Manufacturing 15
Energy Supply Inc. Electric, Gas, Steam, Air Conditioning etc. 1
Construction 5
Retail Inc. Wholesale 23
Transportation Inc. Storage and Logistics 4
Accommodation and Food 15
Information and Communication 7
Financial Services Inc. Insurance 7
Real Estate 6
Professional, Scientific and Technical 9
Administration 12
Public Administration and Defence 4
Education 16
Health Inc. Social Work 16
Other Inc. Arts, Recreation etc. 11
Total 151

St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EF is within the Chester City policing neighbourhood, under the Cheshire Constabulary force area. For non-urgent queries, contact 101. For emergency assistance, please contact 999. In April 2021, 253 crimes were reported within half a mile of CH1 1EF.

Neighbourhood Team

Data courtesy of police.uk. See our Data Sources page for more information.

Key: Railway Station Hospital GP Dentist Optician Primary School Secondary School

Below are the details of the closest services to CH1 1EF. All distances are straightline distances, please consult the map of the facility to check the exact location. You can also view these details on our interactive services map for CH1 1EF.

Nearest Railway Stations

Listed here are the 20 closest railway stations to St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EF. The nearest railway station is Chester, approximately 0.7 miles away.

Name Approximate Distance*
Chester 0.7 miles
Bache 1.4 miles
Capenhurst 5.3 miles
Hawarden 5.9 miles
Hawarden Bridge 6.2 miles
Shotton 6.3 miles
Ellesmere Port 6.4 miles
Stanlow & Thornton 6.5 miles
Overpool 6.7 miles
Ince & Elton (Cheshire) 6.8 miles
Little Sutton 7 miles
Buckley 7.1 miles
Mouldsworth 7.2 miles
Penyffordd 7.5 miles
Helsby 7.7 miles
Hope (Flintshire) 7.9 miles
Caergwrle 8.2 miles
Hooton 8.3 miles
Cefn-y-Bedd 8.6 miles
Eastham Rake 9 miles

Nearest Primary Schools

Listed here are the 10 closest primary schools to St. Michaels Row, Grosvenor Precinct, Chester, CH1 1EF. The nearest is The Grosvenor Park Church of England Academy, approximately 490 yards away.


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Site Front Door Search the Site Index Check out the Route Map A brief introduction to Chester The Northgate The North Wall The Phoenix Tower The Kaleyard Gate The Cathedral The Eastgate The Newgate & Wolfgate The Amphitheatre / gallery Amphitheatre Comments St. John's Church The 'Roman Garden' River Dee / 2 inc Grosvenor Park The Bridgegate The Castle The Grosvenor Bridge The Roodee The Watergate The Infirmary The Watertower Tower Wharf St. Martin's Gate The Bridge of Sighs Chester's visitors through time The Rows of Chester The Chester Gallery Old Maps & Aerial Photos Old photos of Chester & Liverpool Vanished Chester Pubs / gallery History of Chester's Cinemas The Old Port The Chester Canal Memories of the Royalty Theatre Chris Langford Gallery Chester Mystery Plays Gallery Chester Anagrams! MickleTrafford Railway Stroll Letters about the CDTS Busway Letters about our site The B&W Picture Place Links to Interesting Places Advertise with us Write to us

"We come now to notice another peculiarity of the city, which are its Rows or Galleries . As a stranger to the place, some of the descriptions I have seen in print would give me no distinct comprehension of these rows, nor am I sanguine in the hope that my own delineation will be more successful with regard to others so circumstanced.

Watergate Row North by Louise Rayner (1832-1924). More of her work is here.

The rows occupy, or run parallel with a considerable portion of the four principal streets, within the walls nearest the Cross, but in no instance do they reach to any of the city gates. The level of the walking path in the rows may be reckoned generally at about twelve feet above that of the streets, though in some places not so much. It should also be observed, that besides the flights of steps by which they are entered and quitted at each end, there are other similar conveniences placed at suitable distances on the side-path which lead to and from the streets.

On passing the main street, parallel with which these rows run, a stranger would scarcely be aware of the existence of the latter. He will perceive on each side of the street, a line of shops as in other towns, and take them to be the only ones in the same front. On looking upwards, however, he will perceive a wooden or iron balustrade running along the top of these shops, with upright pillars standing at intervals of five or six yards, supporting the superincumbent buildings, which range in a direct line downwards with the shops in the street. Now the space thus created, by cutting off the communication between the summit of the lower shops, and the higher part of the building above, and which may be taken to be from ten to twelve feet, forms the front or opening of the row backward, within this front, stands another line of shops, the interval in width, occupied as a walking path, or for other purposes, being from four to five yards. Thus the 'passengers' in the rows walk over the shops in the street, and under the first floor of the dwelling-houses and thus two lines of shops are created in one front.

The rows are generally well flagged, and kept in good repair, and are much frequented both by the citizens and strangers, to whom they will ever prove an object of curiosity. In hot weather, a continued stream of cold air passes along the rows, from the numerons entries or avenues which branch from them and in wet weather they afford ample protection from the "pitiless storm." Very considerable improvements in these have occurred within the last thirty years, and are daily taking place for whenever ruin or decay render a re-erection necessary, the spirit of the times, if not the potent influence of the police, imposes a more modern and elegant form of construction. Formerly, in front of the row, was fixed a clumsy wooden railing with immense pillars of oak, supporting transverse beams, upon which the houses, chiefly built of wood and mortar rested, and which leaned forward over the street in a terrific attitude. These old erections, to the no small mortification of the admirers of antiquity, are fast decreasing in most parts of the city though several of them yet remain, particularly in Watergate-street.

To trace the original cause of these rows, with any degree of certainty, is no easy task, concerning which a variety of conjectures have been formed. Some have attributed their origin to the period when Chester was liable to the frequent assaults of the Welsh, which induced the inhabitants to build their houses in this form, so that when the enemy should at any time have forced an entrance, they might avoid the danger of the horsemen, and annoy their assailants as they passed through the streets. This opinion seems to be adopted by Webb, and followed by most other writers on the subject. He says, "And because their conflicts with enemies continued long time, it was needful for them to leave a space before the doors of those their upper buildings, upon which they might stand in safety from the violence of their enemies' horses, and withall defend their houses from spoyl, and stand with advantage to encounter their enemies, when they made incursions".

I am aware that this has long been, and still is the popular sentiment but I think there is very good reason to question its correctness. There is irrefragible evidence, that the form of our city is Roman, and that our walls were the work of that people and the same reasons which justify these conclusions, are not less cogent for presuming that the construction of our streets are Roman also.

Pennant appears to have been governed by this view he says, "These rows appear to me to have been the same with the ancient vestibules and to have been a form of building preserved from the time that the city was possessed by the Romans. They were built before the doors, mid-way between the streets and the houses and were the places where the dependents waited for the coming out of their patrons, under which they might walk away the tedious minutes of expectation. The shops beneath the rows were the cryptae and apothecae, magazines for the various necessaries of the owners of the houses."

The learned Stukeley countenances this hypothesis in his Itinerary of 1724, in which, noticing Chester, he remarks, "The rows, or piazzas, are singular through the whole town, giving shelter to the foot people. I fancied it a remain of the Roman porticoes." The authors of the Magna Britannica dissent from the two last respectable authorities, but their objections would have been more satisfactory, if they had adduced some reasons, or suggested a more probable theory. "Mr. Pennant thinks," ( say the authors), "that he discerns in these rows, the form of the ancient vestibules attached to the houses of the Romans, who once possessed this city many vestiges of their edifices have certainly been discovered at Chester but there seems to be little resemblance between the Chester rows and the vestibules of the Romans, whose houses were constructed only of one story."

Eastgate Row North by George Cuitt (1779-1854)

In the oldest histories extant, descriptive of this city, in some form or other, the elevated rows and the shops beneath are recognized nor have we the slightest intimation of any period in which these rows were constructed, or when the level of the streets were sunk so much below their surface, and the ground behind them. Among the uncertain conjectures that have been hazarded on this subject, there can be no presumption in giving an opinion that their construction is of Roman origin, a position which may be maintained on several grounds of probability.

It hardly requires a word by way of argument to shew that the pavement in Bridge-street, Watergate-street and Eastgate-street, were originally on a level with the ground-floor of the houses standing in the rows for it is utterly impossible to conceive, that the present sunken state of the streets, as contrasted with the elevated ground on each side, could be the effect of natural causes. It is most obvious, therefore, at some period or other, the principal streets have been made to take their present form by dint of human art or labour, and it is not less evident, that from the east, west, and south-gates, to the cross, and from the latter to nearly where the Exchange stands, which is almost the highest part of the city, excavation has been employed. These conclusions, which, although incapable of proof from any existing testimony, have received the concurrence of all our historians and antiquaries.

It should be remembered, too, that the city was the residence of the Romans for the space of nearly four centuries and that the twentieth legion, with its auxiliaries was probably not less than ten thousand men. The long period therefore they were stationed here, and the multitude of their disposable hands, added to the known policy of the Romans, to keep their soldiers in active employ, afforded the best opportunity of securing all the advantages of which their knowledge of the arts and manual labour were capable of producing.

Bridge Street Row East. Unknown artist.

Thus we have the express attestation of Richard of Cirencester, that Chester was constructed by the soldiers of the twentieth. It is probable that protection and defence would be the first objects of the colonists, and it is, therefore, natural to infer that the erection of the walls would occupy their earliest efforts.

Commodiousness and convenience would next occupy their attention and what would be more likely to present itself to the discernment of the Romans, than the desirableness of an easy access to their great court of judicature, their camp, to the auguroli and to their Praetorium, all of which were situated in the centre, or highest part of the city. The original level of the carriage road, at the junction of Watergate and Bridge-streets, may be seen by the present height of the rows in those places, and the difficulty of the ascent up those two streets for heavy carriages, may be pretty easily conceived. It is also worthy of remark, in considering this question, that these were the only parts of the city which had an immediate communication with the waters of the Dee. The river encompassed the lower parts of both, and either at one or the other it was of course necessary to land their warlike stores, forage and provisions, or other heavy materials from the vessels coming thither, requisite for the use of the garrison, from whence they had to be conveyed to the camp.

In these circumstances it appears to me, ample reasons are shewn for the necessity of reducing the steep ascent and although they do not apply in an equal extent to Eastgate-street and Northgate-street, yet here the rise was also considerable, and the refinement of Roman taste would doubtless induce a decision for beauty and uniformity. If there be any correctness in these speculations, it does not appear that gaining new habitations, or the formation of shops on the new level, formed any part of the original Roman plan, but it is probable, that as the city increased in population and prosperity, they were formed from the sides of the wall standing between the rows and the street.

That this construction was executed by the Romans while they held possession of the city, may also be argued from its arduousness and extent. The excavations must have been made in all the streets through the solid rock, as is clearly ascertained from the back parts of the shops and warehouses, in different parts, particularly in Bridge-street and Watergate-street. The legionaries, from their numbers, leisure, and skill as artificers, seem alone capable of their execution nor can we fix upon any other period of our history in which it is likely this immense undertaking could be performed. It is well known, that from the time of the evacuation of the island by the Romans, till within a short time of the Norman conquest, denominated the Saxon times, the city was occupied sometimes by one victor and sometimes by another, and it is hardly to he believed, that the inhabitants, but a short remove from barbarism, had either the taste or means of accomplishing so great an effort of labour or genius.

Old Shoemaker's Row, Northgate Street as portrayed by William Callow in 1854, before it was rebuilt by John Douglas. The ancient Legs of Man Inn is in the centre and the Sun Vaults is on the left. See how the Row looks now at the bottom of the page.

There are still greater improbabilities, if we refer the formation of the rows, by cutting through the ascents to a period subsequent to the conquest. Our old histories abound with various accounts of the state and condition of the public works in the city from that epoch. We have relation, as well as-existing documents, to shew by what means the bridge, the causeway, the mills, and other ancient works, were either built or kept in repair, and in what way the funds necessary for these purposes were raised. The institution of our fairs, the erection of several of our public edifices, and the origin of many ancient customs and usages, are given with great minuteness. But with regard to the excavations, inferior in labour and expence only to the erection of the walls, no mention whatever is to be found-_a circumstance which cannot be satisfactorily accounted for, or thesupposition of this great work being performed by our Norman ancestors. To this may be added, that the reason assigned for the rows, namely, the facility of resisting the incursions of the Welsh, has no weight at all in it. For against this opinion it may be urged, that in none of their attacks upon the city, did they ever force their way within the gates so that these being proved by experience to be sufficient bulwarks against the marauders, there existed no necessity for the creation of any other defences.

The shops in the rows are generally considered the best situations for retail shop-keepers, but those on the south-side of Eastgate-street, and the east-side of Bridge-street have a decided preference. Shops let here at very high rents, and are in never-failing request and perhaps there are no parts of the city which have undergone equally rapid or extensive improvements. A person who traversed these rows thirty years ago, would hardly recognize them by their present appearance. There was one feature in the shops, which is worthy of notice.At that period, or a little before, there was hardly a shop in the row which could boast a glass window. The fronts were all open to the row in two or three compartinents, according to their size, and at nights were closed by huge hanging shutters, fixed on hinges, and fastened in the day-time by hooks to the ceiling of the row. The external appearance of the shops, except as far as regarded the commodity for sale, was little different to that of butchers' standings. At present the shops, and many of the dwelling-houses in the rows, are equal in elegance to those of Manchester or Liverpool. In a word, Eastgate and Bridge-street, are capable of supplying all the real demands of convenience, and the artificial calls of luxury, mental and corporeal presenting a cluster of drapers, clothiers, jewellers, perfumers, booksellers &c, as respectable as the kingdom can produce".

It may come as a surprise to the reader that the above article was written over 175 years ago by local historian Joseph Hemingway and formed part of his excellent guide, the Panorama of the City of Chester (1836). To contemporary Cestrians his lengthy description of the ancient Rows seems entirely familiar. Theories concerning the origins of the rows still abound but many years of archaeological exploration has provided the contemporary student with a few more facts than were possessed by the able Hemingway.

Five centuries after Britain ceased to be a part of the Roman Empire in AD 410, the ruins of the fortress of Deva were still impressive. Four centuries later still, however, little was left above ground- by then, much had either collapsed or been deliberately demolished in order to obtain the ready-cut blocks of stone to re-use in new buildings.

The vanished Roman Chester nontheless influenced the development of its successor, for example in the location of the main thoroughfares. Thus Bridge Street directly overlies the Via Praetoria of the fortress while Eastgate Street and Upper Watergate Street perpetuate the line of the Via Principalis. Similarly Upper Northgate Street sits over the Via Decumana and the fact that its southern continuation does not meet Eastgate Street directly opposite Bridge Street reflects the arrangement of major Roman buildings that once stood at the centre of the fortress.

The ruins of Deva were also responsible, at least in part, for the Rows. The ground behind Row properties is the same level as the first floor walkway and is thus generally 9ft (3.3m) higher than at the street frontage. This has come about because of the differential clearance of the ruins of Roman buildings which were removed along the frontages of the main streets because such areas were the most sought after as building plots in the medieval town where the majority of the inhabitants made their living through commerce.

To the rear, however, the debris resultant from the collapse of Roman structures, which could be up to 5ft (1.5m) thick, was left untouched and was in fact supplemented over the centuries by rubbish and building materials discarded by the residents of the street frontage properties. In certain areas, this process was accentuated by the fact that the Roman buildings were themselves higher than the streets beside them, partly because the sloping ground required them to be terraced and partly because their internal floor levels tended to rise as a consequence of successive rebuildings.

This is demonstrated by comparing floor levels in Roman buildings on opposite sides of Bridge Street. Thus, in the baths on the east side Roman floor level was approximately Ift (30cm) lower than the present pavement whereas in the building on the west side the surface of its internal courtyard was more than 3ft (90cm) higher than the modern pavement. The accumulation of deposits behind the Row properties had a benign effect upon the remains of Roman buildings as, despite robbing-out of walls for reusable stone, much was sealed and protected. This continued to be true even when these 'backland' areas came to be built over for the first time in the nineteenth century as the foundations of the Victorian buildings were generally restricted in width and depth.

Over the centuries, Chester's Rows changed as individual buildings were replaced and construction methods improved: timber, wattle and thatch giving way to brick, slate and fine masonry. In addition, their extent diminished- there are many records of sections of Row being enclosed in order to 'improve' old buildings- or being omitted entirely from newer ones. An easily-inspected example of the former is the splendid Falcon Inn (above) at the juction of Bridge Street and Grosvenor Street. There has been a building here since around 1200 but the earliest documentary reference is a deed of 1602 when it was acquired as a town house from Sir George Hope by the Grosvenor family of Eaton. 40 years later at the beginning of the English Civil War the house was extensively altered by Sir Richard Grosvenor who was largely responsible for The Falcon's present appearance. Sir Richard was a leading Loyalist commander based at Chester Castle and wanted to move his family to the safety of the city, but found that the house was too small. In 1643 he petitioned the Mayor for permission to enlarge the property by enclosing the Row which he claimed "was causing an annoyance". Permission was granted and the Row was blocked off and turned into an additional room.

This enclosed Row still survives in the Front Bar where visitors can see the 13th Century stone piers which once belonged to the building's facade. The timber partition which runs through the bar is a remnant of a late medieval shop front which existed in the Row. Sir Richard's petition set a precedent which was followed by all other residents of Lower Bridge Street and by the mid 18th Century nearly all had enclosed their Rows and, in this part of the city at least, these ancient walkways were lost forever.

In Northgate Street, the southern end (extreme left of our photograph) of the ancient Shoemaker's Row was replaced in 1808 by Thomas Harrison's City Club or Commercial News Rooms . An inn had existed on this spot as far back as 1272 when Richard de Knaresburgh left his daughter a shop "near the inn which was Hugh Selimon's towards the church of St. Peter's". Nothing more is heard of it for 500 years until, in 1782, The Three Crowns' landlord was Thomas Lewis. In 1855, author and guide Thomas Hughes described the inn as having an old and picturesque gable front and that its chief entrance was from Shoemaker's Row. He also remarked that it had enjoyed its finest days long before it was eventually demolished in 1808, when its sign and licence were transferred to new premises in Pepper Alley. The rest of the Row was replaced between 1897 and 1909 by the extremely ornate development of black-and-white timber buildings we see here, different parts being designed by three architects John Douglas, his pupil James Strong- who, a couple of years later, went on to design the ornate fire station (1911) further up Northgate Street- and the County architect Henry Beswick, who had been a pupil of Lockwood. It continued to be called a Row but now contained a single, ground-level enclosed walkway. In the basement of one of the shops here may be inspected some massive column bases from the Praetorium (headquarters building) of the Roman fortress that once stood on this spot. Many visitors express surprise that this part of the Row is largely a product of the 20th century.

Despite these losses, Chester today still boasts considerable stretches of these unique structures. Strictly protected, they will hopefully continue to delight for centuries to come and a wander along them should be considered an essential part of your visit to our beautiful city.

Want to know more? Our chapters devoted to Chester's Visitors Through the Ages contain numerous fascinating quotes about the Rows. Virtual Chester has some detailed information and you can virtually 'walk the Rows' at the wonderfully-eccentric Chester Tourist website!


Help keep the Chester Virtual Stroll growing and up-to-date: please donate !


Access: Due to the historic nature of St Michael's church there is, unfortunately, no access for wheelchair users. However, if notified in advance it will be possible to make other arrangements to see material that we hold. If you cannot visit us in person, we will be pleased to carry out research on your behalf through the Postal Enquiry Service.

We have a variety of family and local history sources to help you in your search:

* General Register Office Index for England and Wales, 1837-1949 (The Civil Registration Index of Births, Deaths and * Marriages on microfiche) - £1 per hour charge
* Census for Chester District, 1841 1901 (on microfiche and microfilm)
* 1881 census for UK (on CD Rom)
* Also on CD Rom: Ormerod, 1851 census for Cheshire, Holy Trinity Church Chester Parish Registers, Betram Merrall Marriage Index and the National Burial Index
* Electoral Registers for Chester (on microfiche)
* International Genealogical Index for Cheshire and surrounding counties (on microfiche)
* Parish Registers for Chester City parishes (on microfilm)
* Local newspapers (cuttings, full papers on microfilm)
* Map collection
* Local Studies Library
* Chester Archaeological Society Library
* Chester Image Bank
* Chester Photographic Survey here - street by street documentation of Chester District from 1960s onwards

Let us help you find out more about Chester, or about your family's past click on one of the menu options, or email us with your own particular query.


St Michael’s | Jackson’s Row | 138.5/45.5m | 40/11 fl | App

Can't say I'm that bothered about losing the Police HQ it was never a particularly good or functional building. I am much more concerned at the loss the Jackson's Row Synagogue. This, in 1952, was one of the first major new buildings erected in central Mancester following the Blitz.

I can understand how it is that inner urban sites no longer suit Jewish congregations but otherwise, might the building not be retained in religious use if converted into a mosque? Manchester really needs a centrally located mosque - the current Molsem Youth Foundation mosque on Turner Street is just a converted warehouse basement.

Future.architect

Far East London

Hulmeman2

Registered

Change of thread title to "St Michaels"?

Far East fortunes flowing into Manchester thanks to Gary Neville and Ryan Giggs

10:30, 27 AUGUST 2015 UPDATED 10:37, 27 AUGUST 2015
BY ADAM JUPP

Singapore-based Rowsley Ltd, in which the billionaire part-owner of Salford City FC Peter Lim is an investor, is backing the vehicle Neville and Giggs set up


Gary Neville and Ryan Giggs’ plans to redevelop Manchester’s former Bootle Street police station will be backed by Far East funders, the M.E.N. can today reveal.

Singapore-based Rowsley Ltd, in which the billionaire part-owner of Salford City FC Peter Lim is an investor, is backing the vehicle Neville and Giggs set up to transform the chunk of land off Deansgate, between Jackson’s Row, Bootle Street and Southmill Street.

It has picked Manchester as its first investment in Europe in a move linked to the Northern Powerhouse agenda spearheaded by chancellor and Tatton MP George Osborne.

And it comes as Rowsley annouced it was buying a 75 per cent stake in Hotel Football.

The deal is a major shot in the arm for the plans to build offices, bars, restaurants, apartments and a five star hotel as part of the development, called St Michael’s Manchester.

It gets its name from St Michael (the Archangel), who is the patron saint of the police, reflecting the heritage of the Bootle Street site bought by Manchester council earlier in year to unlock this project.

Neville said: “This represents a very important milestone for the development of St Michael’s.

”To secure funding for the project this early in the process is a fantastic achievement and demonstrates great confidence in the city.

"Moving swiftly is key and huge credit goes to Rowsley and BCEG for their committed approach in the last two months. We are all truly excited at what can be achieved with this innovative and inspiring development.”

The Jackson’s Row Development Partnership - made-up of Neville, Giggs and Brendan Flood - has signed the deal, along with Manchester council.

Getting the cash stacked-up will enable plans to progress quicker.

Zerum - the property consultancy owned by Neville - will develop the scheme, which is being designed by MAKE, the architectural practice founded by Ken Shuttleworth, who oversaw ther design of the HSBC headquarters in Hong Kong.

The Jackson's Row Development Partnership together with Manchester City Council, have joined with Rowsley Ltd and Beijing Construction and Engineering Group (BCeG) to sign a funding agreement to develop an area in Manchester city centre
Lock Wai Han, chief executive of publicly-listed Rowsley, said: “We are excited to be in Manchester and to tap into its vibrancy and growth. Gary and his team exemplify the dynamism of the city and the City Council, and it’s a style of working we are very comfortable with in Singapore.

“St Michael’s will become a landmark development and will meet the growing demand for quality accommodation and offices in Manchester.

“This will be Rowsley’s first investment in Europe and comes at a time when the UK government is encouraging businesses to move north to escape the rising cost of operating in London. During a recent visit to Singapore, Prime Minister David Cameron urged Singapore companies to consider the ‘Northern Powerhouse,’ including Manchester, which he said was ‘brimming with infrastructure opportunities’.”

He added: “Mr Neville and Mr Giggs, two of Manchester’s most famous residents, have a successful track record in real estate development and hotel management. Their Hotel Football overlooking Manchester United’s Old Trafford stadium, opened to rave reviews in March 2015, with the New York Times touting it as a reason to visit Manchester.”

Beijing Construction Engineering Group is the Chinese state-owned company involved in Airport City, whih is currently under construction.

Mr Xing Yan, managing director of BCEG, said: “We are delighted to be investing in such a prestigious scheme and are looking forward to working with our new partners to ensure St Michael’s long term success.”


Manchester council leader Sir Richard Leese said: “This prime location in the city’s civic quarter is a significant opportunity to complement the investment which is taking place across the city with high quality mixed use development.

“We have supported a robust planning framework for the site, which will be presented to the council’s Executive next month, and very much welcome the involvement of these new investors in the scheme. It’s further proof of Manchester’s standing in the global marketplace and the city’s growing attraction to international investors.”


GET CONNECTED

LOOKING FORWARD TOGETHER
Tuesday 6 July, 8pm

We look forward to the upcoming Vision Evening so do join us in the church, on Tuesday, 6 July, at 8pm as Rupert sets out the next steps in the vision for the future of St Michael’s.

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SERMONS & TALKS

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MARKED OUT FOR FRUITFULNESS

We are taking a break from our studies in Mark and may resume later in the year.

In this series of evenings, we journeyed through Mark together. Each evening included a teaching on a short passage, followed by discussion in break out groups for around ten minutes or so.


Watch the video: Core beliefs in a time of crisis, Acts 2:22-41. St Michaels 6:00pm Service. (January 2022).