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Rani Rupmati Pavilion, Mandu

Rani Rupmati Pavilion, Mandu


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Among the plethora of monuments that dot the landscape of the historical city of Mandu in Madhya Pradesh, is the Roopmati Pavilion, an ode to love. The sandstone structure is perched regally on the edge of a 365m precipice overlooking the Nimar Valley and to the south of the Baz Bahadur Palace. It stands as testimony to the legendary tragic love story of Baz Bahadur, the mid-16th century Sultan of Mandu, a great musician, and his queen, Rani Roopmati, a singer of repute.

We traverse a broad, winding pathway to come upon a flight of stairs that brings us to the 16th century monument. The 72m high fort, Roopmati Pavilion, the southern-most monument in the city, is a magnificent expression of Afghan architecture in sandstone. It is evident that the monument underwent construction in phases during different time periods. The original design, sans pavilions, was built as an observation post for the royal army as a low, large hall with a pair of rooms on each side and a heavy sloping base. A symbol of their undying love, it was later transformed into the abode of Roopmati with a western side extension along the plinth. It was extended so as to enable the queen, who fervently worshipped the Narmada, to see the river and perform religious rites without stepping out of the fort.

The basement of the pavilion is characterised by corridors that have several arched openings along their width. The western ledge has a large reservoir from which rainwater collected during the monsoons would be channelled from the roof of the structure to a tank below by means of conduits.

However, it is the pavilions on the terrace of the original block that we access via spiral stairs, a later addition, which lends the structure its distinctive allure. The square-based pavilions are crowned with hemispherical domes that are fluted on the interior and exterior. We are treated to a visual delight as we climb a flight of steps to reach the pavilion top. Nature's enchantment leaves us mesmerised as lush forests, plateaus, valleys and vast stretches of far away hills stretch before us.

The Baz Bahadur Palace, closeby, lies on the hill-slope to the east of Rewa Kund and is set in the midst of picturesque verdure. Tall, sleek arches welcome us at the entrance to the twin-storeyed palace which is accessed by well laid, broad steps with landings at intervals. In its days of glory, an aqueduct ran on top of the arches, transporting water from Rewa Kund, the adjoining tank, to the pool in the palace courtyard. The water would be drawn upwards by Persian wheels that were powered by animals.

An inscription in Persian on the arch states that the palace was built in 1508 by Nasir-ud-Din. Incidentally, Nasir-ud-Din Shah Khilji, the Sultan of Malwa, is credited with designing this aesthetic structure which underwent repairs and renovations during the period of Baz Bahadur. Big courtyards and high terraces are distinct aspects of the palace that is an aesthetic blend of Mughal and Rajput architectural styles.

Halls and rooms with arched gates skirt the huge courtyard which is adorned by a stunning cistern with crystal clear water in the centre. The palace terrace is further adorned with a couple of chhatris or elevated domed pavilions. One of the big rooms, that even today has astounding natural acoustics, served as the music and dance hall of the palace.


Top 10 Tourist Places to Visit in Mandu

Mandu City is embellished with spell-binding Afghan architecture surrounded by African baobab trees. The grand palaces are still alive with royal romance while the gateways (darwazas) tell of an imperial conquest background. A walk through Mandu will leave you amazed, the way you used to hear grandparent stories. Here are the few must visit places in Mandu.

Jahaz Mahal

Jahaz Mahal’s magnificent architecture takes on an expense in Madhya Pradesh’s Mandu district. Completed during Mandu Sultan Ghiyas-ud-din Khilji’s reign, it is estimated to have as many as 15,000 women as his consorts. In the second half of the 15th century Jahaz Mahal was constructed to accommodate the women belonging to the royal consortium.

Jahaz Mahal captures Mundu’s medieval history at its best. Jahaz’ here refers to a ship and’ Mahal ‘ refers to a palace, a representation of the building itself. Surrounded by water from a pond, it seems to float gently above the water’s surface.

Rani Rupmati’s Pavilion

Unless history is to be believed this building was built because Baz Bahadur’s attention was allegedly drawn by Rani Rupmati, a very beautiful Hindu singer.

Baz Bahadur has designed this magnificent piece of architecture using all his influence and riches to highlight his love for her. It is built on the banks of the river Narmada because Rani Rupmati is believed to have been so much in awe of the river that she would not even drink water until she saw the river Narmada. This place as in the earlier times is still squeaky clean.

Hathi Mahal

The huge, unsuitable dome and the thick pillars give the spectators an illusion of a standing Elephant. Originally built as a pleasure resort, today Hathi Mahal looks like an abandoned landmark in Madhya Pradesh where traces of decorative tile-work and planned external architectural nuances still leave an impressive mark on the visitors ‘ mind.

Bagh Caves

Bagh Caves derived its name from the seasonal Baghani lake, which runs through these Buddhist sculptures. Bagh Caves have a collection of sculptures and carvings and are one of the finest caves in Buddhism amongst others. Located in the Dhar district’s Bagh town, you can spot them on the Vindhya Ranges southern slopes.

The Buddhist monk Dataka is said to have established a set of nine rock-cut monuments between the late 4th and 6th centuries A.D. The walls are covered in brown dense mud plaster, decorated with antique mural paintings. It is one of the spectacular and commanding sites to see in Mandu and it is one of the best places in Madhya Pradesh for caving experience.

Rewa Kund

Another witness to Roopmati and Baz Bahadur’s legendary love story which is located near Jami Masjid. This artificial lake was designed to ensure that the Roopmati Pavilion provided regular water supply.

Roopmati, who was a renowned classical singer, is also said to have regularly come to worship at this Kund. It is fringed with beautiful design and style Pillars and Arches under the shadow of which visitors and pilgrims can relax and admire the timeless beauty of this reservoir.

Munja Talao

Munja Talao is situated west of Jahaz Mahal, and is the largest of the nearby two water bodies. Bordered by a jumble of ruins, the monsoons in Mandu are generously brimmed to it. The famous Jahaz Mahal is one of the monuments surrounding the pool, and one gets an uninterrupted view of the Talao from the Palace.

Dilawar Khan’s Mosque

Completed in 1405 this mosque has an amalgamation of Islamic and Hindu architecture. Looking for a dilapidated balcony called Tiger’s Balcony or Nahar Jharokha though you admire the intricacy and design of the carvings and the building. It has a very interesting story associated with it, which dates back to years of construction.

Lohani Caves

Such rock-cut cells are said to be Shaiva Yogis ‘ primitive residence. The locals aren’t aware of these caves ‘ past, but they do say it’s been contested. Such caves are completely void of inscriptions and carvings, just a collection of sharply cut rocks that seem to have been populated by humans since the pre-Muslim times, more specifically the Yogis, like cells.

These excavations are part of the Shaivism tradition of the 11th and 12th centuries, and are quite unique archeological sites. Several temple ruins have been found here along with Hindu gods and goddess’s sculptures such as Shiva and Parvati, some of which can be seen in the Chhappan Mahal Museum.

Caravan Sarai Monument

Caravan Sarai is an old tavern in front of Jama Masjid. It houses a very spacious central open court, and adjacently situated twin halls with vaulted ceilings on each side of the courtyard. A dilapidated collection of similar caverns and windows is situated further down to the Malik Mughis Mosque. It was an ancient inn where tourists would rest and rewind to Mandu on their journey.

Shri Mandavgarh Tirth

This renowned temple is dedicated to Lord Shri Suparshawnath Bhagwan, and inside the temple which sits in a padmasana posture a white stone is carved into his idol. The temple is situated at Fort Mandavgarh, and the idol is 3 feet tall. This temple is a secret gem and one of the must-visit tourist places in Mandu, particularly for the devotees and seekers of peace.

Nestled in the fort’s vast campus, which sits atop the Vindhya Parvat, it offers a dramatic backdrop. Near the temple are the Bhojanshalas and Dharamshala’s.


Rupmati temple

This article is about the city in India. For the dumpling, see Mandu (dumpling).

Mandu, or Mandavgarh, is a ruined city in the Dhar district in the Malwa region of western Madhya Pradesh state, central India. The distance between Dhar & Mandu is about 35KM. In the 11th century, Mandu was the sub division of the Tarangagadh or Taranga kingdom . This fortress town on a rocky outcrop about 100 km (60 miles) from Indore is celebrated for its fine architecture. Mandu celebrates in stone the life and love of the poet-prince Baz Bahadur for his consort, Rani Roopmati. The balladeers of Malwa still sing of the romance of these royal lovers. High on the crest of a hill, Rani Roopmati's pavilion gazes down at Baz Bahadur's palace, a magnificent expression of Afgan architecture.
Rani Rupmati Pavilion at Mandu
Rani Rupmati Pavilion at Mandu

Mandu's old name was "Shadiabad" meaning the city of happiness (Anand Nagari), the name was given by then ruler Allauddin Khilji. During its time of prosperity, there was nobody poor in the city. Any poor permitted to stay in the city was donated a brick and a gold coin each by the residents of the city so as to bring him / her at par with others. The live example is "Dai Ka Mahal" which was built by a poor old woman on joining the city. Mandu is also famous for its special kind of tamarind known as Mandu ki Imli, the fruit looks like a papaya. The second famous fruit of the Mandu is "Khirani", a yellow coloured fruit also known as "Mandu ka Mewa".

Mandu city is situated at an elevation of 633 metres (2079 feet) and extends for 13 km (8 miles) along the crest of the Vindhya Range, overlooking the plateau of Malwa to the north and the valley of the Narmada River to the south. Mandu with its natural defences was originally the fort-capital of Rajput Parmara rulers of Malwa. Towards the end of the 11th century, it came under the sway of the Taranga kingdom. The city reached its greatest splendour in the early 15th century.

The circuit of the battlemented wall is nearly 37 km (23 miles), enclosing a large number of palaces, mosques and other buildings. The oldest mosque dates from 1405 the finest is the Jama Masjid or great mosque, a notable example of Pashtun architecture. The marble domed tomb of this ruler is also magnificent.

Mandu was abandoned by the 17th century.

* This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

* Mandu at the Islamic Monuments of India Photographic Database

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India - Madhya Pradesh - Mandu - Rupmati Pavilion - 18b

The Malwa Sultanate was a late medieval independent kingdom in the Malwa region of the present day Madhya Pradesh state in India in 1392–1562.

The sultanate of Malwa was founded by Dilawar Khan Ghuri, the governor of the Delhi Sultanate in Malwa, who asserted his independence in 1392, but did not actually assume the ensigns of royalty till 1401. Initially Dhar was the capital of the new kingdom, but soon it was shifted to Mandu which was renamed Shadiabad (the city of joy). After his death, he was succeeded by his son Alp Khan, who assumed the title of Hoshang Shah. The Ghuri dynasty founded by Dilawar Khan Ghuri was replaced by Mahmud Shah I, who proclaimed himself king on May 16, 1436. The Khilji dynasty founded by him ruled over Malwa till 1531. Mahmud I was succeeded by his eldest son Ghiyas-ud-Din. The last days of Ghiyas-ud-Din was embittered by a struggle for throne between his two sons, Nasir-ud-Din and Ala-ud-Din. Nasir-ud-Din, however emerged victorious and ascended the throne on October 22, 1500. The last ruler Mahmud Shah II surrendered to Bahadur Shah, the sultan of Gujarat after the fort of Mandu fell to Bahadur on May 25, 1531.

During 1531 – 1537 the kingdom was under the control of Bahadur Shah though the Mughal emperor Humayun captured it for a short period during 1535-36. In 1537, Qadir Shah, an ex-officer of the previous Khilji dynasty rulers regained control over a part of the erstwhile kingdom. But in 1542, Sher Shah Suri conquered the kingdom defeating him and appointed Shuja'at Khan as the governor. His son, Baz Bahadur declared himself independent in 1555. In 1561, Akbar's army led by Adham Khan and Pir Muhammad Khan attacked Malwa and defeated Baz Bahadur in the battle of Sarangpur on 29 March, 1561. Akbar, soon recalled Adham Khan and made over command to Pir Muhammad. Pir Muhammad attacked Khandesh and proceeded up to Burhanpur but he was defeated by a coalition of three powers: Miran Mubarak Shah II of Khandesh, Tufal Khan of Berar and Baz Bahadur. Pir Muhammad died while retreating. The confederate army pursued the Mughals and drove them out of Malwa. Baz Bahadur regained his kingdom for a short period. In 1562, Akbar sent another army led by Abdullah Khan, the Uzbeg, which finally defeated Baz Bahadur. He fled to Chittor. It became a Subah of the Mughal empire and Abdullah Khan became its first governor.

Many remarkable illustrated manuscripts were prepared during the period of the sultanate. An illustrated manuscript of Kalpa Sutra (1439) (presently in the National Museum, Delhi) was prepared in Mandu during the reign of Mahmud Shah I But the most interesting is a manuscript of the Nimat Nama, a treatise on the art of cooking, which bears many portraits of Ghiyas-ud-Din Shah but the colophon bears the name of Nasir-ud-Din Shah. The other notable illustrated manuscripts of this period are of the Miftah-ul-Fuzala, a dictionary of rare words, the Bustan (1502) painted by Haji Mahmud and the Aja'ib-us-San'ati (1508). Another manuscript of the Anwar-i-Suhaili (now in the National Museum, Delhi) probably also belong to this period.


Roopmati Pavilion in Mandu was first built as an army observation post but later it was known as the symbol of love. The famous story of Baz Bahadur and Rani Roopmati became the symbol of love and history from the past. This pavilion lies towards the south and has a low and large hall with two rooms on each side in the beginning. However, later on, the building was extended towards the western side of the plinth and the square pavilion housing the hemispherical dome was added.

There are many small details on the structure of this pavilion and it also has several arched openings towards the width. The structure has a large reservoir where rainwater was collected during the monsoon season. This pavilion has an incredible sight of the Narmada flowing 305 meters below the pavilion.


Never ending history of Mandu

Rani Roopmati Pavillion was made by Baz Bahadur for Roopmati for her to take a sight of River Narmada as she was the devotee of Narmada. The Rewa Kund just below the pavillion is said to be having water of river Narmada.

Immortalized by Bollywood but quite over-rated in my view. Best view would be during monsoon. Also, a little away from main attractions of Mandu. Well maintained though.

Rani Roopmati Pavilion is a nice place in Mandu. Entry fee is common for Pavilion as well as Baaz bahadur palace.
There is open parking for vehicles outside and one has to walk a bit uphill from the gate to reach the place. The architecture is good.
Its good place to visit during morning or evening when its not too hot.

It is very good location on top of the hill . One can see lakes and river from top . Islamic architecture and very clean place. Guide is needed to understand love story or research before visiting.

You have to climb a min hill from parking lot to see the beautiful structure. Surprisingly when it was too hot outside you will enjoy very cool breeze once you enter the building and the construction techniques are amazing. Very good view from the top. But avoid taking elders as you have to climb steep road. Better to read the history before visiting the place.

We drove down from Mhow to Mandu, which we had not seen during our earlier tenure. My colleague who was accompanying us, recommended that we start with the Mandu visit by driving right up to Rani Roopmati's Pavilion. There is one single road through Mandu and the Pavilion is right at the end. The pavilion was initially an army observation post overlooking the Nimar Valley. On a clear day one can see the Narmada in the far distance. Unfortunately it was hazy when we visited.
As the story goes Roopmati was a Hindu singer and shepherdess with whom Sultan Baz Bahadur the Muslim ruler of Malwa fell in love. She agreed to marry him and became the Queen of Malwa. It is said their marriage was conducted according to both Muslim and Hindu rites. Impressed with the openness of society then. Wow!
The pavilion is beautifully maintained by the Archaeological Survey of India. The marks of renovation are visible and it seems that renovation is still not complete.
Do take time to walk up the gradual incline over which horses and elephants used to travel up to the top of the hill. Have a look at the rain water harvesting system which was made in the 1500's.
This place is worth a visit. The right time to visit is during the monsoons or post monsoons when the place is absolutely green. Our visit was in the beginning of the summer so the place was brown, but the plus was there were barely any tourists.
Another visit is on the cards during the monsoons.

This is the version of our website addressed to speakers of English in India . If you are a resident of another country or region, please select the appropriate version of Tripadvisor for your country or region in the drop-down menu. more


Mandu

Mandu
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
• Find out more about navigating Wikipedia and finding information •
This article is about the city in India. For the dumpling, see Mandu (dumpling).
Jahaz Mahal.

Mandu, or Mandavgarh, is a ruined city in the Dhar district in the Malwa region of western Madhya Pradesh state, central India. The distance between Dhar & Mandu is about 35KM. In the 11th century, Mandu was the sub division of the Tarangagadh or Taranga kingdom . This fortress town on a rocky outcrop about 100 km (60 miles) from Indore is celebrated for its fine architecture. Mandu celebrates in stone the life and love of the poet-prince Baz Bahadur for his consort, Rani Roopmati. The balladeers of Malwa still sing of the romance of these royal lovers. High on the crest of a hill, Rani Roopmati's pavilion gazes down at Baz Bahadur's palace, a magnificent expression of Afgan architecture.
Rani Rupmati Pavilion at Mandu

Mandu's old name was "Shadiabad" meaning the city of happiness (Anand Nagari), the name was given by then ruler Allauddin Khilji. During its time of prosperity, there was nobody poor in the city. Any poor permitted to stay in the city was donated a brick and a gold coin each by the residents of the city so as to bring him / her at par with others. The live example is "Dai Ka Mahal" which was built by a poor old woman on joining the city. Mandu is also famous for its special kind of tamarind known as Mandu ki Imli, the fruit looks like a papaya. The second famous fruit of the Mandu is "Khirani", a yellow coloured fruit also known as "Mandu ka Mewa".

Mandu city is situated at an elevation of 633 metres (2079 feet) and extends for 13 km (8 miles) along the crest of the Vindhya Range, overlooking the plateau of Malwa to the north and the valley of the Narmada River to the south. Mandu with its natural defences was originally the fort-capital of Rajput Parmara rulers of Malwa. Towards the end of the 11th century, it came under the sway of the Taranga kingdom. The city reached its greatest splendour in the early 15th century.

The circuit of the battlemented wall is nearly 37 km (23 miles), enclosing a large number of palaces, mosques and other buildings. The oldest mosque dates from 1405 the finest is the Jama Masjid or great mosque, a notable example of Pashtun architecture. The marble domed tomb of this ruler is also magnificent.

Mandu was abandoned by the 17th century.

[edit]
References
This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

[edit]
External link
Mandu at the Islamic Monuments of India Photographic Database


Rani Rupmati Pavilion, Mandu - History

The last bus to Mandu graciously dropped us at the bus stand at 7 PM, despite we being the only passengers using its service. With a very few high priced options for lodging, we chose the Nagar Panchayat Rest house, which though lacking in comfort was easy on the pocket. A side walk of 1 KM from the road took us to the lone building in the vast barren expanse of shrubs and trees. The lane was pitch dark and light from cell phone display was the only way to figure out if we were walking on the path or the bushes. A sole watchman, probably in his nineties pointed us to an open room with two beds.

After a good night's sleep, the foggy dawn revealed the town to us as we set out at 6:30 AM. We merrily pedaled on our rented cycles towards Rani Rupmati's pavilion at one end of the fortified town. Mandu originally a military fortress was conquered by the Mughals in the 1300s and later christened Shadiabad (city of joy) owing to the number of pleasure palaces and lakes that dotted the town. As many were the number of people here, there seemed to be twice the number of cattle and thrice the number of children. The only concrete in the entire vicinity was on the roads (all the houses were thatched huts with mud plastered walls). We parked our cycles near the Rewa Kund to visit the deserted Baz bahadur's palace and Rupmati's pavilion.


The place is said to have been the witness to the romance between Sultan Baz Bahadur, the mughal ruler who devoted himself mostly to music and poetry and his queen Rupmati. A slight drizzle and a whiff of chill air welcomed us into the empty corridors of the Baz bahadur palace. The nearby Rupmati's pavilion, situated on a 365 meter high precipice is from where the lady offered her prayers to River Narmada, visible at a far distance. On our way back, we visited a number of other monuments in various stages of dilapidation. The architecture was an amalgam of the mughal style with various elements typical of Deccan and Hindu architecture of West India. Most domes had turquoise patches at places, revealing that they were originally covered with Lapiz lazuli tiles, lost to the ravages of time. A lone kid selling Sitaphal that had fallen off trees was happy to sell his fruits for as less as a rupee and provided for a tasty breakfast.


(Inside Malik Mughtibh's Mosque)

At the center of the city were four monuments which can be treated as the prime attraction of the place. The Jami masjid and Hoshang shah's tomb are part of the same complex while Jahaz and Hindola mahal are a kilometer away. Jami masjid is an imposing sandstone structure while Hoshang shah's tomb an intricately crafted white marble mausoleum. On entering the Jahaz Mahal I was troubled to see a huge mob of noisy school and college kids (the day being a Sunday). I escaped into the deserted corners of Hindola Mahal. The broken walls and domes set against a placid lake and green grass seemed to come alive in solitude. At once I was charmed by the magic of Mandu. With a handful of grazing cattle for company, I mulled over the timeless charm of this quaint little hill town in an inaccessible corner a town that holds together in it's heart an idyllic combination of a ravaged yet ravishing past and a humble bucolic present.


Itinerary & Tips

Day 2

Started at 6:30 and visited the monuments in Mandu by 1 PM. After lunch, took a cab to Bhadwah and from there a bus to Khandwa to catch a night train to Pune.

Mandu has the barest of facilities to offer. MPSTDC has a hotel with the lowest priced rooms starting from 1100. Nagar panchayat rest houses are right at the bus stand and provide a night’s accommodation for Rs.150. If they are occupied (as in our case) another rest house 2 Km away provides the same for twice the cost. (Unless you have your blankets/bed sheets and are ready to face broken doors and dirty toilets do not venture into these).

Bicylces (Rs.30-40 a day) are the only way to get around if you don’t have your own vehicle. There are 2-3 hotels serving decent food. Spending a day or two in the town (preferably not weekends) can be quite a refreshing experience away from the routine hustle.


Watch the video: Mandav tourist places. rani roopmati pavilion. Roopmati Pavilion. rani roopmati Mahal. mandu (December 2021).