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Harry F. Bauer DM-2ff - History

Harry F. Bauer DM-2ff - History

Harry F. Bauer DM-2ff

Harry F. Bauer

Harry Frederick Bauer was born 17 July 1904 at Camp Thomas Lytle, Gal, and graduated from the Naval Academy in 1927. During the early part of his career he served at shore stations, including a tour as instructor at the Naval Academy, and in Twiggs, Cuyama, and Tracy. Bauer was commissioned Lieutenant Commander 1 July 1941 and took command of fast transport Gregory 1 January 1942. While acting as combat transports for Marines off Guadalcanal during the night of 4-5 September 1942, Gregory and Little were surprised by three Japanese destroyers covering a small troop landing. Though vastly outgunned, the two transports fought valiantly before being sunk. Lt. Comdr. Bauer was badly wounded, and while being pulled clear by two of his crew ordered them to rescue another man crying out for assistance. Bauer was lost, receiving the Silver Star posthumously for his gallantry.

(DM-2ff: dp. 2200: 1. 376'6"; b. 40'10"; dr. 15'8"; s. 34 k.; cpl. 336; a. 3 5", 8 20mm., 2 .50 car.; cl. Robert H. Smith)

Harry F. Bauer (DM-26) was launched as DD-738 by Bath Iron Works Corp., Bath, Maine, 9 July 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Harry F. Bauer, wife of Lt. Bauer; converted to minelayer DM-26 and commissioned 22 September 1944, Comdr. R. C. Williams, Jr., in command.

Following shakedown training out of Bermuda and minelayer training off Norfolk, Harry F. Bauer sailed 28 November 1944 via the Panama Canal arriving San Diego 12 December. After additional training both there and at Pearl Harbor she departed Hawaii 27 January 1945 as a unit of Transport Group Baker for the invasion

Iwo Jima,- next stop in the island campaign toward Japan. As Vice Admiral Turner's invasion troops stormed ashore 19 February, Harry F. Bauer acted as a picket vessel and carried out antisubmarine patrol to protect the -transports. As the campaign developed, the ship also conducted shore bombardment, destroying several gun emplacements, tanks, and supply dumps. She proceeded to Ulithi 8 March to prepare for the last and largest of the Pacific island operations,Okinawa

Harry F. Bauer arrived Kerama Retto 25 March and helped screen minecraft during preliminary sweeps of the invasion area. Under intensive air attack during this period, she shot down several Japanese planes, three on the night of 28-29 March alone. On the day of the assault, 1 April 1945, she joined the picket ships offshore, and for over two months of antisubmarine and anti-aircraft duty was under almost continuous attack. A torpedo crashed through her ballast tank 6 April, but failed to explode, and she again shot down three aircraft on the night of 29 April 1945. While in company with J. William Ditter 6 June, she was attacked by eight enemy aircraft Each ship accounted for three; one crashed close aboard Harry F. Bauer, flooding two compartments. Although damaged herself, the ship escorted the crippled J. William Ditter to Kerama Retto. Survey of her damage during repairs revealed an unexploded bomb in one of her flooded compartments.

After repairs at Leyte, Harry F. Bauer arrived Okinawa 15 August, the day of the Japanese surrender. With the prospect of massive minesweeping in Japanese waters incident to the occupation, she sailed 20 August for the East China Sea, where she engaged in minesweeping operations until arriving Sasebo 28 October. Sailing for the United States 1 December she arrived San Diego 22 December.

Sailing to Norfolk 8 January 1946, Harry F. Bauer began operations with the Atlantic Fleet. These consisted of antisubmarine cruises in the Atlantic and Caribbean, tactical training and fleet maneuvers. During October-November 1948 she took part in 2d Fleet exercises in the Atlantic, and in June-July 1949 participated in a Naval Academy training cruise with giant battleship Missouri.

In 1950 Harry F. Bauer made her first cruise to the troubled Mediterranean, departing 9 September and returning to Charleston 1 February 1951. During the years that followed she continued with tactical operations, that took her to the Caribbean and Northern Europe. She ended active steaming in September 1955 and decommissioned 12 March 1956 at Charleston, entering the Atlantic Reserve fleet, Philadelphia, where she remains.

Harry F. Bauer received a Presidential Unit Citation for the series of courageous actions off Okinawa during that bitter campaign where "the fleet had come to stay" and four battle stars for World War II service.


Harry F. Bauer

Harry Frederick Bauer (July 17, 1904 – September 5, 1942) was an naval officer in the United States Navy.

Born at Camp Thomas in Lytle, Georgia, Bauer, the son of a U. S. Army First Sergeant, graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1927. During career he served at shore stations, including a tour as instructor at the US Naval Academy, and an Ensign assigned to duty aboard the USS Arkansas. By 1931 Harry had been promoted to Lieutenant Junior Grade and continued his service on the Arkansas. During his service on the Arkansas, he was awarded a Letter of Commendation by the Secretary of the Navy.

He subsequently served on the USS Babbitt and on the USS Elliott. In June 1934 he was reassigned to the Naval Academy for post graduate work and as an instructor. On 1 January 1935, Jackie and Harry’s only child, Emilie, was born. In 1936 he was assigned as Aide and Flag Lieutenant to the Commander Cruisers, Scouting Force and from there he went to the USS Tracy as executive officer. [Note: In 1927, the United States Naval Academy did not award academic degrees to their graduates. Instead, they were commissioned in the Armed Forces as Officers. This was changed by an Act of Congress approved on 8 July 1937 and supplemented by the Navy with Bureau of Navigation Bulletin Number 251, 28 August 1937. Officers who were graduates of the Naval Academy were allowed to apply for the award of a Bachelor of Science degree. In 1937 while assigned to the Tracy, Harry applied for his degree and it was granted In February 1939 he was assigned to the Office of the Detail Officer at the Bureau of Navigation, Department of the Navy, Washington D.C. On 1 July 1941 he was promoted to Lieutenant Commander. He remained in Washington until he assumed command of the USS Gregory on 1 January 1942. Bauer was commissioned Lieutenant Commander July 1, 1941 and took command of fast transport USS Gregory (APD-3) Ώ] January 1, 1942. While acting as combat transports for Marines off Guadalcanal during the night of 4-September 5, 1942, On 4 September Gregory and Little were returning to their anchorage at Tulagi after transferring a Marine Raider Battalion to Savo Island. The night was inky-'black with a low haze obscuring all landmarks, and the ships decided to remain on patrol rather than risk threading their way through the dangerous channel. As they steamed between Guadalcanal and Savo Island at ten knots, three Japanese destroyers (Yudachi, Hatsuyuki, and Murakumo – entered the Slot undetected to bombard American shore positions. At 0056 on the morning of 5 September, Gregory and Little -saw flashes of gunfire which they assumed came from a Japanese submarine until radar showed four targets—apparently a cruiser had joined the three DD's. While the two outgunned but gallant ships were debating whether to close for action or depart quietly and undetected, the decision was taken out of their hands.

A Navy pilot had also seen the gunfire and, assuming it came from a Japanese submarine, dropped a string of five flares almost on top of the two APD's. Gregory and Little, silhouetted against the blackness, were spotted immediately by the Japanese destroyers, who opened fire at 0100. Gregory brought all her guns to bear but was desperately overmatched and less than 3 minutes after the fatal flares had been dropped -was dead in the water and beginning to sink. Two boilers had burst and her decks were a mass of flames. Harry Bauer, himself seriously wounded, gave the word to abandon ship, and Gregory's crew reluctantly took to the water. Harry, making the ultimate sacrifice, ordered two companions to aid another crewman yelling for help and was never seen again for his brave and gallant conduct he posthumously received the Silver Star, the Purple Heart, and promotion to Commander (Page 71). His memorial marker is in Arlington National Cemetery. The destroyer USS Harry F. Bauer (DM-26), which earned a Presidential Unit Citation in 1945 ΐ] for action in the Okinawa Campaign was named for him. Α]


Mục lục

Harry F. Bauer được đặt lườn, như là tàu khu trục DD-738 thuộc lớp Allen M. Sumner, vào ngày 6 tháng 3 năm 1944 tại xưởng tàu của hãng Bath Iron Works ở Bath, Maine, và được hạ thủy vào ngày 9 tháng 7 năm 1944 được đỡ đầu bởi bà Gladys Boyd Bauer, vợ góa Trung tá Bauer. Nó được xếp lại lớp như một tàu khu trục rải mìn với ký hiệu lườn DM-26 vào ngày 19 tháng 7 năm 1944 trước khi nhập biên chế vào ngày 22 tháng 9 năm 1944 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Trung tá Hải quân Richard-Claggett Williams, Jr.

Trận Iwo Jima Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất việc chạy thử máy huấn luyện tại vùng biển Bermuda, và huấn luyện rải/quét mìn ngoài khơi Norfolk, Virginia, Harry F. Bauer khởi hành vào ngày 28 tháng 11 năm 1944 để đi sang vùng bờ Tây, băng qua kênh đào Panama và đi đến San Diego, California vào ngày 12 tháng 12. Sau khi tiếp tục được huấn luyện tại đây và tại vùng biển quần đảo Hawaii, nó rời Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 27 tháng 1 năm 1945 trong thành phần hộ tống cho một đội vận chuyển tham gia vào chiến dịch đổ bộ lên Iwo Jima.

Khi binh lính dưới quyền chỉ huy chung của Phó đô đốc Richmond K. Turner đổ bộ lên hòn đảo vào ngày 19 tháng 2, Harry F. Bauer hoạt động trong vai trò cột mốc radar canh phòng nhằm cảnh báo sớm các cuộc không kích của đối phương, cũng như tuần tra chống tàu ngầm bảo vệ các tàu vận tải. Khi trận chiến trên bộ diễn ra ác liệt, nó cũng tham gia hoạt động bắn phá bờ biển để phá hủy các công trình phòng ngự của đối phương, cho đến khi nó khởi hành đi Ulithi vào ngày 8 tháng 3, nơi hạm đội được nghỉ ngơi, bảo trì và tiếp liệu nhằm chuẩn bị cho chiến dịch đổ bộ tiếp theo lên Okinawa.

Trận Okinawa Sửa đổi

Đi đến ngoài khơi Okinawa vào ngày 25 tháng 3, Harry F. Bauer lập tức phải đối đầu với những đợt không kích cảm tử Kamikaze liên tục của đối phương. Trong một đợt tấn công quy mô lớn của đối phương vào ngày 29 tháng 3, nó bắn rơi ba chiếc và đánh đuổi những chiếc còn lại đến ngày 6 tháng 4, một máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi đã thả một quả ngư lôi trúng mạn trái mũi tàu và xuyên qua phía mạn phải, nhưng bị tịt ngòi và không kích nổ. Sang ngày 20 tháng 4, con tàu lại chịu đựng một đợt tấn công khác, trực tiếp bắn rơi ba máy bay đối phương và trợ giúp vào việc tiêu diệt thêm hai chiếc khác bảy ngày sau đó, nó lại chống trả thành công một đợt tấn công và bắn rơi một máy bay đối phương.

Vào ngày 11 tháng 5, một đợt không kích quy mô lớn lại nhắm vào Harry F. Bauer. Một máy bay Kamikaze tự sát, bị hỏa lực phòng không của con tàu bắn trúng, đã đâm xuống sàn sau phía đuôi tàu, sượt qua một loạt các quả mìn sâu trước khi đâm xuống biển điều kỳ diệu là không có quả mìn nào bị kích nổ. Thêm hai máy bay đối phương khác cũng bị bắn rơi trong ngày hôm đó. Đến ngày 27 tháng 5, một nhóm tàu ngầm đối phương đã tấn công đội hình của chiếc tàu khu trục, và nó đã trợ giúp vào việc tiêu diệt một chiếc trong số đó.

Sang đầu tháng 6, sau khi hạm đội chịu đựng một cơn bão lớn, đến lượt máy bay Kamikaze đối phương phản công. Một tốp đông máy bay đối phương đã tấn công ác liệt, và con tàu đã kiên trì cơ động né tránh và tự vệ, bắn rơi ba máy bay tấn công tự sát. Một trong những chiếc máy bay bổ nhào tự sát đã đâm sượt qua cấu trúc thượng tầng con tàu con tàu chịu đựng được cú đâm, tiếp tục nổi và vẫn có thể di chuyển. Một trong những thùng nhiên liệu của con tàu bên dưới mực nước phía giữa tàu đã bị thủng, và thủy thủ đoàn tin rằng đó là do mảnh bom xuyên qua và hai khoang kín nước của con tàu đã bị ngập. Chỉ khi con tàu được sửa chữa sau đó, người ta mới phát hiện một quả bom 550 lb (250 kg) phóng ra từ chiếc máy bay Kamikaze sau cùng đã xuyên qua lườn tàu và nằm bên trong thùng nhiên liệu mà không kích nổ. [2]

Sau khi được sửa chữa tại Leyte, Philippines, Harry F. Bauer đi đến Okinawa vào ngày 15 tháng 8, vào đúng ngày Nhật Bản chấp nhận đầu hàng. Nó lại lên đường vào ngày 20 tháng 8 để đi sang biển Hoa Đông, nơi nó tham gia vào nhiệm vụ rà quét vô số bãi thủy lôi còn lại sau chiến tranh. Con tàu đi đến Sasebo, Nhật Bản vào ngày 28 tháng 10, rồi lên đường bốn ngày sau đó để quay trở về Hoa Kỳ, về đến San Diego vào ngày 22 tháng 12.

Sau chiến tranh Sửa đổi

Được điều động gia nhập Hạm đội Đại Tây Dương, Harry F. Bauer khởi hành đi Norfolk, Virginia vào ngày 8 tháng 1, 1946. Nó thực hiện những chuyến thực tập huấn luyện và cơ động hạm đội tại Đại Tây Dương và vùng biển Caribe. Vào tháng 10 và tháng 11, 1948, nó tham gia tập trận cùng Đệ Nhị hạm đội tại khu vực Bắc Đại Tây Dương, và trong tháng 6 và tháng 7, 1949, nó tiến hành chuyến đi thực tập cho học viên sĩ quan thuộc Học viện Hải quân Hoa Kỳ cùng thiết giáp hạm Missouri (BB-63).

Vào năm 1950, Harry F. Bauer lần đầu tiên được phái sang Địa Trung Hải nó lên đường vào ngày 9 tháng 9, và quay trở về Charleston, South Carolina vào ngày 1 tháng 2, 1951. Trong những năm tiếp theo nó luân phiên các hoạt động tương tự tại Đại Tây Dương, biển Caribe và các vùng biển Châu Âu. Con tàu ngừng hoạt động vào tháng 9, 1955 và chính thức được cho xuất biên chế tại Charleston vào ngày 12 tháng 3, 1956, được đưa về Hạm đội Dự bị Đại Tây Dương và neo đậu tại Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Tên nó được cho rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 15 tháng 8, 1971 và nó bị bán để tháo dỡ vào ngày 1 tháng 6, 1974.

Harry F. Bauer được tặng thưởng danh hiệu Đơn vị Tuyên dương Tổng thống cùng bốn Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Thế Chiến II.


Post World War II and fate [ edit | edit source ]

Sailing to Norfolk 8 January 1946, Harry F. Bauer began operations with the Atlantic Fleet. These consisted of antisubmarine cruises in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, tactical training and fleet maneuvers. During October–November 1948 she took part in 2nd Fleet exercises in the Atlantic, and in June–July 1949 participated in a Naval Academy training cruise with USS Missouri (BB-63).

In 1950 Harry F. Bauer made her first cruise to the Mediterranean Sea, departing 9 September and returning to Charleston, South Carolina 1 February 1951. During the years that followed she continued with tactical operations, that took her to the Caribbean and Northern Europe. She ended active steaming in September 1955 and decommissioned 12 March 1956 at Charleston, entering the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Harry F. Bauer was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 15 August 1971 and sold for scrap on 1 June 1974.

Harry F. Bauer received a Presidential Unit Citation for the Okinawan campaign and four battle stars for World War II service.

As of 2009, no other ship has been named Harry F. Bauer.


Gus Lofberg, Jr. '27 was in command of USS Little (APD 4), which was also lost in this action.

The "Register of Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps" was published annually from 1815 through at least the 1970s it provided rank, command or station, and occasionally billet until the beginning of World War II when command/station was no longer included. Scanned copies were reviewed and data entered from the mid-1840s through 1922, when more-frequent Navy Directories were available.

The Navy Directory was a publication that provided information on the command, billet, and rank of every active and retired naval officer. Single editions have been found online from January 1915 and March 1918, and then from three to six editions per year from 1923 through 1940 the final edition is from April 1941.

The entries in both series of documents are sometimes cryptic and confusing. They are often inconsistent, even within an edition, with the name of commands this is especially true for aviation squadrons in the 1920s and early 1930s.

Alumni listed at the same command may or may not have had significant interactions they could have shared a stateroom or workspace, stood many hours of watch together… or, especially at the larger commands, they might not have known each other at all. The information provides the opportunity to draw connections that are otherwise invisible, though, and gives a fuller view of the professional experiences of these alumni in Memorial Hall.


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# OTD in 1945, the destroyer minelayer USS Harry F. Bauer fending off a heavy Japanese air attack near Okinawa. Unbeknownst to the crew, a 550 lb bomb had pierced the hull and crashed into the fuel tank but failed to detonate. The live bomb was not discovered until 17 days later when the fuel tank was drained during a survey of damage. Had the bomb detonated, the Harry F. Bauer would almost certainly have been lost.

I wonder if the Japanese were using slave labor in their munitions plants too? Reminds me of a similar story from the European theater.

This story is confirmed in Elmer Bendiner's book, The Fall of Fortresses

Sometimes, it's not really just luck.*

Elmer Bendiner was a navigator in a B-17 during WW II. He tells this story of a World War II bombing run over Kassel, Germany, and the unexpected result of a direct hit on their fuel tanks. "Our B-17, the Tondelayo, was barraged by flak from Nazi antiaircraft guns. That was not unusual, but on this particular occasion our fuel tanks were hit.

Later, as I reflected on the miracle of a 20-millimetre shell piercing the fuel tank without touching off an explosion, our pilot, Bohn Fawkes, told me it was not quite that simple. "On the morning following the raid, Bohn had gone down to ask our crew chief for that shell as a souvenir of unbelievable luck.

The crew chief told Bohn that not just one shell but 11 had been found in the fuel tanks. 11 unexploded shells where only one was sufficient to blast us out of the sky. It was as if the sea had been parted for us. A near-miracle, I thought.

Even after 35 years, so awesome an event leaves me shaken, especially after I heard the rest of the story from Bohn.

"He was told that the shells had been sent to the armourers to be defused. The armourers told him that Intelligence had picked them up. They could not say why at the time, but Bohn eventually sought out the answer. "Apparently when the armourers opened each of those shells, they found no explosive charge. They were as clean as a whistle and just as harmless.

Empty? Not all of them! One contained a carefully rolled piece of paper. On it was a scrawl in Czech. The Intelligence people scoured our base for a man who could read Czech. Eventually they found one to decipher the note. It set us marvelling. Translated, the note read:


Contents

Following shakedown training out of Bermuda and minelayer training off Norfolk, Virginia, Harry F. Bauer sailed 28 November 1944 via the Panama Canal arriving San Diego, California 12 December. After additional training both there and at Pearl Harbor she departed Hawaii on 27 January 1945 as a unit of Transport Group Baker for the invasion of Iwo Jima, next stop in the island campaign toward Japan. As Vice Admiral Richmond K. Turner's invasion troops stormed ashore 19 February, Harry F. Bauer acted as a picket vessel and carried out antisubmarine patrol to protect the transports. As the campaign developed, the ship also conducted shore bombardment, destroying several gun emplacements, tanks, and supply dumps. She proceeded to Ulithi on 8 March to prepare for the last and largest of the Pacific island operations, the Battle of Okinawa.

Harry F. Bauer arrived off Kerama Retto 25 March and helped screen minecraft during preliminary sweeps of the invasion area. Under intensive air attack during this period, she shot down several Japanese planes, three on the night of 28–29 March alone. On the day of the assault, 1 April 1945, she joined the picket ships offshore, and for over two months of antisubmarine and anti-aircraft duty was under almost continuous attack. A torpedo crashed through her ballast tank 6 April, but failed to explode, and she again shot down three aircraft on the night of 29 April 1945. While in company with USS J. William Ditter (DM-31) 6 June, she was attacked by eight aircraft. Each ship accounted for three one crashed close aboard Harry F. Bauer, flooding two compartments. Although damaged herself, the ship escorted the crippled J. William Ditter to Kerama Retto. Survey of her damage during repairs revealed an unexploded bomb in one of her flooded compartments.

After repairs at Leyte, Harry F. Bauer arrived at Okinawa on 15 August, the day of the Japanese surrender. With the prospect of massive minesweeping in Japanese waters incident to the occupation, she sailed 20 August for the East China Sea, where she engaged in minesweeping operations until arriving Sasebo 28 October. Sailing for the United States 1 December she arrived San Diego 22 December.


Harry F. Bauer DM-2ff - History

The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION to the

&ldquoFor extraordinary heroism in action against enemy Japanese forces as Support Ship on Radar Picket Station and in the Transport Screen during the Okinawa Campaign from March 24 to June 11, 1945. One of the first ships to enter Kerama Retto seven days prior to the invasion, the U.S.S. HARRY F. BAUER operated in waters protected by mines and numerous enemy suicide craft and provided fire support for our minesweeper groups against hostile attacks by air, surface, submarine and shore fire. Constantly vigilant and ready for battle, she furnished cover for our anti-submarine screen, served as an antiaircraft buffer for our Naval Forces off the Okinawa beachhead and, with her own gunfire, downed thirteen Japanese planes and assisted in the destruction of three others. A natural and frequent target for heavy Japanese aerial attack while occupying advanced and isolated stations, she defeated all efforts of enemy Kamikaze and dive-bombing planes to destroyer her. On April 2, she rendered invaluable service by fighting fires and conducting salvage operations on a seriously damaged attack transport. Although herself damaged by a Japanese suicide plane which crashed near her on June 6, she remained on station and escorted another stricken vessel back to port. A seaworthy, fighting ship, complemented by skilled and courageous officers and men, the HARRY F. BAUER achieved a notable record of gallantry in combat, attesting the teamwork of her entire company and enhancing the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.&rdquo

/s/ John L. Sullivan
Secretary of the Navy

Source: NARA Modern Military Records (NECTM). Textual Archives Services Division.


Harry F. Bauer DM-2ff - History

A Tin Can Sailors
Destroyer History

USS HARRY F. BAUER
(DM-26)

Launched on 9 July 1944, the DD-738 was named for Lt. Commander Harry F. Bauer, captain of the fast transport GREGORY (APD-3). She and a second destroyer, the LITTLE (APD-4), were off Guadalcanal when they were surprised by a Japanese surface force. Both American ships were lost. Commander Bauer, who was badly wounded, gave the order to abandon ship and sent members of his crew to help others. He was never seen again.

Subsequently, the new destroyer was converted to minelayer DM-26 and was commissioned 22 September 1944 as a unit of Division 7, Mine Squadron 3. By the following November, she began her trek west. She steamed out of Pearl Harbor, bound for the invasion of Iwo Jima, on 27 January 1945. As the marines stormed ashore on 19 February, the BAUER was on radar picket duty. As the landing continued, she also provided gunfire support for the troops, destroying several gun emplacements, tanks, and supply dumps.

Okinawa was the BAUER's next destination. She arrived at Kerama Retto on 25 March, one of the first ships to enter Kerama Straits. Immediately, she was under intense air attack as she covered minesweepers clearing the invasion area. Her gunners shot down three Japanese planes on the night of 28-29 March and were credited with a possible fourth, according to Richard Hansen, historian for the Naval Minewarfare Association. On 1 April 1945, the day of the invasion, she cleared the invasion area to join the ships patrolling offshore on antisubmarine and antiaircraft radar picket duty.

The BAUER was under attack almost continuously for the next two months. On 5 April, just after her arrival on station, a single plane flew over the ship. At the same time, reported Richard Hansen, the crew felt a thud, as if the ship had hit some debris. During their preliminary investigation, the damage control team "discovered that the paint locker just forward of the chief's quarters was flooded. At dawn, inspection revealed a torpedo was lodged just below the water line, its warhead on one side of the ship and the propeller and motor on the other." The ship returned to Kerama Retto to have the torpedo removed and the holes patched. In tribute to her husband and the ship that bore his name, the crew shipped the torpedo's tail fins to Harry F. Bauer's widow.

Back on picket station on 29 April, the BAUER's gunners brought down three aircraft. One of the attackers came in straight for the boat deck. "At the last minute, the pilot turned his plane on its side with the wings straight up and down and went between the stacks, taking out the radio antennae and crashing into the sea to port," wrote Richard Hansen. Just before the plane reached the ship, RM 2c Ed Brookes, stuck his head out of the emergency radio shack door. One look and he slammed and dogged the door shut. Certain that he awaited his doom, he crouched against the bulkhead. Moments later, cheers lured him out to see with relief that the plane had crashed into the water not the ship.

A similar incident occurred on 10 May 1945. A Japanese plane dove on the ship, "strafing as she came." She came in over the 20-mm gun tubs, just aft of the stack. While the rest of the gun crew ducked inside the splinter shield, the gun captain continued to fire on the approaching plane. Then, realizing that the plane might hit the upraised gun barrel, he lowered it and ducked for cover. "The plane hit a K-gun and knocked a depth charge over the side, cut the life-line on the boat deck, and crashed into the sea. A moment later, the depth charge and bomb the plane was carrying both exploded beyond the fantail doing no damage to the ship." The BAUER's only casualty occurred when a radioman caught a bullet from the diving plane's guns.

On 28 May, the ship responded to a different threat when her ping jockeys made a sound contact. Somewhere below, a submarine lurked. Her crew sewed a deadly pattern of depth charges, which were followed by a series of explosions. One enemy submarine out of the war.

By this time, the crew was calling their ship "Old Lucky" because of the growing number of close calls she'd had. It looked like her luck had run out, however, on 6 June 1945. She was in company with her sister ship, the DITTER (DM-31), when eight enemy raiders swooped down on them. The two DMs brought down three planes apiece, but not without a cost. Both were hit. One of the attackers crashed close aboard the BAUER's sonar shack. The twin-engine bomber skidded into the side of the ship creating holes that flooded the forward emergency diesel room and the fuel tank below it. The DITTER suffered the most damage, and although damaged herself, the BAUER escorted her crippled sister to Kerama Retto. There, inspectors assured the officers and crew that the holes in Old Lucky's fuel tank were made by parts of the plane. If it were a bomb, they said, it most certainly would have exploded.

Seventeen days later, the BAUER steamed into Leyte for repairs. After plates were welded over the holes in the ship's side, repair crews drained the fuel tanks and made an unnerving discovery. Resting against the forward engine room bulkhead was a 555-pound bomb. Old Lucky was still true to her nickname. Authorities quickly ordered the BAUER moved to an anchorage away from other ships, and a bomb disposal expert went to work defusing the bomb. The crew then removed it from the fuel tank, cleaned it, and laid it out on the wardroom table. That was when they saw stenciled on the side of the bomb, "Made in Bayonne, New Jersey." Later, when Japanese and Americans compared notes on the war, the mystery was solved. In the 1930s, the U.S. sold Pearl Harbor's outdated coastal defense guns to the Japanese who also took the guns' shells, added fins, and turned them into bombs.

After repairs at Leyte, the BAUER returned to Okinawa on 15 August, the day of the Japanese surrender.


Harry F. Bauer - Harry F. Bauer

Harry Frederick Bauer (17 července 1904 - 5.9.1942) byl námořní důstojník v námořnictvu Spojených států .

Bauer, syn prvního seržanta americké armády, se narodil v Camp Thomas v Lytle ve státě Georgia. V roce 1927 absolvoval námořní akademii Spojených států. Během své kariéry sloužil na pobřežních stanicích, včetně prohlídky jako instruktor na americké námořní akademii , a prapor přidělen do služby na palubě USS Arkansas (BB-33) . V roce 1931 byl Harry povýšen do hodnosti poručíka a pokračoval ve službě v Arkansasu . Během své služby v Arkansasu mu byl ministrem námořnictva udělen vyznamenání.

Následně sloužil na USS Babbitt (DD-128) a na USS Elliot (DD-146) . V červnu 1934 byl převelen k námořní akademii pro postgraduální práci a jako instruktor. 1. ledna 1935 se narodilo jediné dítě Jackie a Harryho, Emilie. V roce 1936 byl přidělen jako pobočník a poručík vlajky k velitelům křižníků, průzkumným silám a odtud přešel k výkonnému důstojníkovi na USS Tracy (DD-214) . [Poznámka: V roce 1927 neudělala námořní akademie Spojených států svým absolventům akademické tituly. Místo toho byli pověřeni v ozbrojených silách jako důstojníci. To bylo změněno zákonem Kongresu schváleným 8. července 1937 a doplněným námořnictvem o Bulletin Bureau of Navigation číslo 251 ze dne 28. srpna 1937. Důstojníkům, kteří byli absolventy námořní akademie, bylo umožněno žádat o udělení titulu Bachelor of Science stupeň. V roce 1937, když byl přidělen k Tracy, Harry požádal o titul a bylo mu uděleno. V únoru 1939 byl přidělen do kanceláře detailního důstojníka v Bureau of Navigation, Department of Navy, Washington DC. 1. července 1941 byl povýšen na nadporučíka . Zůstal ve Washingtonu, dokud 1. ledna 1942 nepřijal velení nad vysokorychlostním transportem USS Gregory (APD-3) .

Zatímco v noci ze 4. na 5. září 1942 působil jako námořní transportér pro námořní pěchotu mimo Guadalcanal . 4. září se Gregory a USS Little (APD-4) vracely do svých kotvišť v Tulagi po převodu praporu Marine Raider na ostrov Savo . Noc byla temná s nízkým oparem zakrývajícím všechny památky a lodě se rozhodly zůstat na hlídce, místo aby riskovaly cestu nebezpečným kanálem. Když se parili mezi Guadalcanalem a ostrovem Savo na deset uzlů, tři japonští torpédoborce (Yudachi, Hatsuyuki a Murakumo) vstoupili nepozorovaně a bombardovali americké pobřežní pozice. V 0056 ráno 5. září viděli Gregory a Little záblesky střelby, které podle jejich názoru pocházely z japonské ponorky, dokud radar neukazoval čtyři cíle - ke třem japonským torpédoborcům se zjevně přidal i křižník. Zatímco dvě vystřelené lodě debatovaly o tom, zda se mají zavřít kvůli akci nebo odejít tiše a nezjištěné, bylo rozhodnutí vyňato z jejich rukou.

Pilot námořnictva také viděl střelbu a za předpokladu, že pocházela z japonské ponorky, upustil řetězec pěti světlic téměř na dva APD. Gregoryho a Little , siluety proti temnotě, okamžitě spatřili japonští torpédoborce, kteří zahájili palbu v 01:00. Gregory přivedl všechny své zbraně, ale byl zoufale překonán a necelé 3 minuty poté, co padly smrtelné světlice, byl v voda a začíná se potápět. Praskly dva kotle a její paluby byly hromadou plamenů. Velící důstojník Bauer, sám těžce zraněn, dal slovo k opuštění lodi a Gregory ' s osádka vzal do vody. Bauer, přinášející nejvyšší oběť, nařídil dvěma společníkům, aby pomohli jinému členovi posádky křičet o pomoc, a už ho nikdy neviděli. Za své statečné a galantní chování posmrtně získal Stříbrnou hvězdu , Purpurové srdce a povýšení na velitele . Příběhy hrdinské akce vznikly potopením Gregoryho . Poddůstojník první třídě Karla francouzští plaval 6-8 hodin ve vodách plných žraloků blízko Guadalcanal, zatímco tažení záchranný člun s 25 Gregory ' s přeživšími pro zachycování vyhnout a případné realizace japonských sil na zemi. Gregory ' s velícím důstojníkem, Lt. Cdr. Harry F. Bauer , když byl zraněn a umíral, nařídil dvěma společníkům, aby ho opustili a šli na pomoc jinému členovi posádky, který křičel o pomoc. Už ho nikdy neviděli. Baurerovi byla vydána posmrtná Stříbrná hvězda , Purpurové srdce a povýšení na velitele .

Jeho pamětní značka je na Arlingtonském národním hřbitově . Byl pro něj pojmenován torpédoborec USS Harry F. Bauer (DM-26) , který si v roce 1945 vysloužil prezidentskou citaci za akci v kampani na Okinawě .


Watch the video: Goldhagen Debatte Goldhagen unter Deutschen 26 (December 2021).