Articles

23 September 1944

23 September 1944

23 September 1944

War at Sea

German submarines U-859 sunk in the Strait of Malacca

Eastern Front

Soviet troops reach the Gulf of Riga

Western Front

British 2nd Army liberates Elst

War in the Air

RAF Bomber Command breaches the Dortmund-Ems canal



Operation Market Garden September 23rd, 1944

A StuG, sell propelled gun in Oosterbeek

The Airbornes are hard pressed around the perimeter at Oosterbeek, the Germans use heavy artillery and snipers combined with sharp attacks backed by armor to try and cut the perimeter in two. The Brits and Poles have a shortage of food, water, medicine and ammunition due to the fact that most of the supplies dropped fall into enemy hands. Only the long range artillery fire from XXX corps keeps the perimeter intact. It’s uncertain how long the perimeter can hold out.

Another attempt was made to ferry the polish paratroopers across the Rhine, followed by 5 Dorset and 7 Hampshire of the 43rd Wessex division. However there are only 16 boats available and just 250 Poles managed to get across and into the perimeter, the Dorsets and Hampshires can do nothing but wait and never even got close to the boats. During the crossing the Poles sustain very heavy casualties.

Hells Highway

A destroyed Panther command tank (note the antennae)

Late in the afternoon the Allies manage to reopen the corridor at Veghel, persistent attacks from the 501st and the 506th PIR of the 101st Airborne and the 44 Royal Tank Regiment of the 32 Guards brigade manage to break up the blockade. It takes a while longer to clear the roads of destroyed vehicles but eventually the road is reopened and traffic once more flows towards Arnhem. At Eerde the 501st PIR stops German Assaults coming from Schijndel by German Paratroopers.

At the landing zones near Son the 907th Glider Field Artillery arrives with 105mm artillery pieces, this is a welcome addition to the division artillery which was desperately short of organic artillery up to this point.

Nijmegen

In the afternoon the 82nd Airborne finally receives reinforcements and finally has all the troops on the ground near Nijmegen. It’s 325th Glider infantry regiment arrives together with batteries from the 80th Airborne Antiaircraft battalion. 348 gliders land on Landingzone O at Overasselt. Later 500 Polish Paratroopers are dropped here too and march to their brethren at Driel. Finally, on day 7 of the operation all units are on the ground in the Netherlands.

The 508th PIR attacks from the Waalbridge towards Erlecom along the South bank of the Waal River. Where their attack stalls is the frontline for the next few months with static warfare not unlike WWI.


President Truman announces Soviets have exploded a nuclear device

In a surprisingly low-key and carefully worded statement, President Harry S. Truman informs the American people that the Soviets have exploded a nuclear bomb. The Soviet accomplishment, years ahead of what was thought possible by most U.S. officials, caused a panic in the American government.

The United States developed the atomic bomb during the latter stages of World War II and dropped two bombs on Japan in August 1945. By the time of the bombings in Japan, relations between the United States and the Soviet Union were already crumbling. Many U.S. officials, including President Truman, came to see America’s atomic monopoly as a valuable asset in the developing Cold War with Russia. Most American officials, and even the majority of scientists in the United States, believed that it would be many years before the Soviets could develop an atomic bomb of their own, and by that time the United States would have achieved a vast numeric superiority. On September 3, 1949, however, U.S. scientists recorded seismic activity from inside the Soviet Union that was unmistakably the result of an underground nuclear test. 

Truman, informed of this development, at first refused to believe it. He ordered his scientific and military advisers to recheck their data. Once they confirmed the results, however, Truman had to face the fact that America’s nuclear monopoly was gone. He also had to face the task of informing the American people, for the news was sure to leak. On September 23, he issued a brief statement to the media. “We have evidence,” the statement read, “within recent weeks an atomic explosion occurred in the USSR.” The president attempted to downplay the seriousness of the event by noting that “The eventual development of this new force by other nations was to be expected. This probability has always been taken into account by us.”


This Week in AG History -- Sept. 23, 1944

Melvin Hodges (1909-1988), an Assemblies of God missionary to Central America, posed this question in 1944 in the Pentecostal Evangel. The Second World War was on everyone&rsquos mind, and Hodges described the seemingly intractable conflicts around the world. &ldquoNations are locked in a struggle for their very existence,&rdquo he wrote, and countless people are killed &ldquoas opposing systems of government struggle [to maintain] their way of life.&rdquo

How should the Christian respond to such conflict? Hodges encouraged believers to exhibit &ldquocalmness and steadfastness.&rdquo Believers will stay &ldquoon a true course regardless of the storms that rage,&rdquo according to Hodges, if they have faith in the promises of God and submit to God&rsquos will.

Significantly, Hodges also admonished readers to reject the racism that had permeated vast segments of the world. Hodges wrote, &ldquoWe must not be moved from the love of God in our hearts toward all men by the spirit of racial hatred being fostered today. Some hold the Jew responsible for all the ills of the world. Others are moved to intense hatred of the enemy nations. Again, some manifest bitterness toward certain racial groups in America.&rdquo

According to Hodges, blaming people groups or nations &ldquois a false diagnosis of the ills of this sick world.&rdquo Instead, he identified the world&rsquos woes as being rooted in &ldquothe evil nature of all unregenerate mankind.&rdquo

Hodges is perhaps best known for his promotion of indigenous church missions theory &mdash the belief that churches should be self-governing, self-supporting, and self-propagating, rather than controlled by outside missionaries. Hodges&rsquo article, though, also pertains to what are usually regarded as missionary-sending nations, offering a critique of racism in America and Europe, as well as in non-Western nations.

It would have been easier for Hodges to remain silent when confronted by racial hatred in his own culture. By speaking out, he risked marginalization. But Hodges believed that racial hatred and God&rsquos love were incompatible, and that Christians must not assign blame for social problems to racial or cultural groups. This wise counsel continues to be true today.

Read &ldquoCall to Calmness and Steadfastness&rdquo by Melvin Hodges on page 8 of the Sept. 23, 1944, issue of the Pentecostal Evangel.

Also featured in this issue:

&bull &ldquoWhy I Came to Egypt Thirty-Four Years Ago,&rdquo by Lillian Trasher

&bull &ldquoFamily Worship,&rdquo by Walter Scott

Pentecostal Evangel archived editions courtesy of the Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center.


September 23 Zodiac Horoscope Birthday Personality

SEPTEMBER 23 birthday horoscope predicts that you are a smart individual who is capable of making quick and sensible decisions. This is probably because you are incredibly sharp-eyed and methodical. People think twice before trying to do you any harm. You are sharp and shrewd.

The zodiac sign for September 23 birthday is Libra – the Scales. With all of your many gifts, you have a hard time remaining humble and uncomplaining. It’s typical that this Libra is concerned with appearances and image.

10 comments

Everything. Was. Spot. On. Wow.

Thank you so much for this.

Vary accurate. All of it for me. Was surprised about the Opal and I thought our Major Arcana was the Justice card

Evry word u have mentioned is so fitting

Most of these things do explain me for the most part. I won’t go out in public without shower,hair and makeup done. After that,I just don’t care what I look like the rest of the day. I do feel that it’s hard to make friends but only with other female’s. There are only a few friends that I keep for years. I do enjoy being alone alot though I did not know my Chinese zodiac was a dog for our birthday day. I am the year of the dragon. I also did not know about the opal for our day since September is sapphire. I learned a few things about us that is kinda cool

“You like art, sports, winning and dining, traveling, you do it all.”

I’m pretty sure you meant wining and dining, although winning is nice too. I like to win and I was born on this cusp.

Thanks for letting us know about the error.

Thanks.
Very good, I read about the birthday of everyone I know but not many people.
I was born on September 23 and it’s really not easy for me to make new friends although I don’t feel this need, I’m a loner and the few friends I have …. well, I don’t see them often.

Many things in this text are true for me, but about beauty, I disagree…
I don’t care about my appearance or the appearance of others, it’s rare that I look in the mirror when I go to the street or walk.
The physical beauty in a person does not matter to me but there is something strange that I usually feel attracted to different people and even considered strange and ugly by the majority, as grotesque, threatening or Martian appearances.

I just read our birthday txt above… More or less yes it’s true. I agree about the beauty part what you wrote because I don’t care about that whatsoever. And it’s also true not easy to live under this sign at especially when Virgo also a dominant sign. Only thing is great about us we are really a very special people and not many people can be blessed like us.

Most of the things are true for me especially the one which said that making friends is difficult. It’s true I can be a loner at times, but when I do make friends I cherish them for a long time and they become my best friends. Also about the birthstone, I wasn’t aware that each day had a birthstone. I thought that only months had birthstones, like for September it’s Sapphire.


Operation Market Garden – Daily Situation Report – September 23th, 1944

The Airbornes are hard pressed around the perimeter at Oosterbeek, the Germans use heavy artillery and snipers combined with sharp attacks backed by armour to try and cut the perimeter in two. The Brits and Poles have a huge shortage of food, water, medicine and ammunition due to the fact that most of the supplies dropped fall into enemy hands. Only the long range artillery fire from XXX corps keeps the perimeter intact. It’s uncertain how long the perimeter can hold out.

Another attempt was made to ferry the polish paratroopers across the Rhine, followed by 5 Dorset and 7 Hampshire of the 43rd Wessex division. However there are only 16 boats available and just 250 Poles managed to get across and into the perimeter, the Dorsets and Hampshires can do nothing but wait and never even got close to the boats. During the crossing the Poles sustain very heavy casualties.

Eindhoven / Veghel

Late in the afternoon the allies manage to reopen the corridor at Veghel, persistent attacks from the 501st and the 506th PIR of the 101st Airborne and the 44 Royal Tank Regiment of the 32 Guards brigade manage to break up the blockade. It takes a while longer to clear the roads of destroyed vehicles but eventually the road is reopened and traffic once more flows towards Arnhem. At Eerde the 501st PIR stops German Assaults coming from Schijndel by German Paratroopers.

At the landing zones near Son the 907th Glider Field Artillery arrives with 105mm artillery pieces, this is a welcome addition to the division artillery.

In the morning the 82nd Airborne finally receives reinforcements. It’s 325th Glider infantry regiment arrives together with batteries from the 80th Airborne Antiaircraft battalion. 348 gliders land on Landingzone O at Overasselt.

The 508th PIR attacks from the waalbridge towards Erlecom along the South bank of the Waal River. Where their attack stalls is the frontline for the next few months with static warfare not unlike WWI.


September 23, 2020 Michigan’s First Night Football Game in 1944

Today we are going back to look at Michigan’s First Night Football Game on September 23, 1944. The Wolverines were having trouble filling their football schedule during the War Years (1941-1945). So, they turned to an opponent that they had not played since 1909. Yes, Michigan played little Marquette College in 1909 and beat them by a score of 6-5. After thirty-five years, it seemed like a good idea to play them again. So, Michigan agreed to travel to Milwaukee to play in a historic game.

(Note – The 1944 Michigan Football team is shown above. Bob Nussbaumer (#40) is seated in the first row – fifth man from the right. Photo courtesy of the Bentley Historical Library at The University of Michigan.)

Yes, that was a long time ago – seventy-five years to be exact. The game was historic because it was Michigan’s first night football game – ever! I can’t imagine that the lighting was great, but there was enough light to play the game. Apparently Michigan had trouble hanging onto the ball (4 or 5 fumbles), but they managed to grind out a 14-0 win for Coach Fritz Crisler. The “hero” of the game was junior running back Bob Nussbaumer who turned 17 carries into 117-yards.

Bob Nussbaumer was probably the “Player of the Game” in Michigan’s first night game victory in 1944. Photo courtesy of the Bentley Historical Library at The University of Michigan.

Some More Michigan Football History About This Game/Season

  • This was the second game of Michigan’s sixty-fifth football season.
  • Michigan’s first night game at Marquette was also the first time the Wolverines ever played on September 23rd.
  • The Wolverine win against Marquette was program victory number 366.
  • This game was the second and last game against Marquette.
  • Of course, Bob Nussbaumer’s excellent game gave him the distinction of being the first Wolverine to rush for 100-yards in a night game.
  • Michigan ended the 1944 season with a final record of 8 wins and 2 losses.
  • Finally, it was the only season in Michigan football history where they won three games by a score of 14-0 (Marquette, Illinois and Wisconsin)

(Note – For more information about Bob Nussbaumer check out the link below:

Some More History About Games Played on September 23rd

September 23rd is one of the best days to play football at The University of Michigan. The Wolverines have played seven games on this day and won them all. Yes, the Maize and Blue footballers have a perfect record of 8-0-0 on the twenty-third day of this month.

The Wolverines have a record of 3-0-0 against Big Ten teams on September 23rd. They own wins over Illinois (2000), Wisconsin (2006) and Purdue (2017).

Of course, Michigan has won all of their non-conference games on this day against the likes of Marquette (1944), Duke (1967), UCLA (1972 & 1989), Notre Dame (1978).

Yes, our Wolverines need to play more games on September 23rd, don’t you think?


The Daily Sun (Goose Creek, Tex.), Vol. 27, No. 86, Ed. 1 Saturday, September 23, 1944

Daily newspaper from Goose Creek, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.

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six pages : ill. page 18 x 13 in. Digitized from 35 mm. microfilm.

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The first library building in the Baytown area was a branch of the Harris County Library, opening in 1925. Municipally funded public library service commenced with the dedication of Sterling Municipal Library in 1963. The name honors Ross Sterling for his vision and commitment to the printed word.

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  • Main Title: The Daily Sun (Goose Creek, Tex.), Vol. 27, No. 86, Ed. 1 Saturday, September 23, 1944
  • Serial Title:The Daily Sun

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Daily newspaper from Goose Creek, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.

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six pages : ill. page 18 x 13 in. Digitized from 35 mm. microfilm.

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  • Volume: 27
  • Issue: 86
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Newspapers have served the Baytown area since 1919, when the Goose Creek Gasser was founded. In 1924, the Gasser became the Goose Creek Tribune, publishing twice-weekly, and in 1928 – the Daily Tribune. With the Great Depression, several area newspapers merged, and in 1931, the first Tri-Cities Sun was published.

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Remembering 9/11 in Pictures

Seventeen years later, the attacks of September 11, 2001, are still fresh in the memories of many Americans.

Nearly 3,000 people in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania lost their lives on 9/11 after terrorists orchestrated by Osama bin Laden hijacked airplanes as weapons. As the years pass, suffering continues alongside the memorializing—among those who lost loved ones and by survivors who sustained injuries or who were forever changed by the horrific events—even as the country, and the world, changes.

Now, the site of the New York City attacks is home to One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere and a marker of resilience in the face of tragedy. There are also memorials near the Pentagon and in Stoystown, Pennsylvania.

This year, to honor the anniversary, the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York City—which opened in 2014—will host its annual 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony, followed by the "Tribute in Light", in the evening, with twin beams of light representing the World Trade Center buildings illuminating the New York City skyline from 3 p.m. to midnight Eastern time.

The events will complement the permanent parts of the museum that document the tragedy of that day. Clifford Chanin, vice president of education and public programs at the museum, said in a previous interview that “many of the images from 9/11 still convey the rawness and brutality of the attack … they still have the capacity to shock.”


Liberty Media Corporation reattributed Live Nation and other assets and liabilities between the Formula One Group and the Liberty SiriusXM Group.

Liberty Media Acquisition Corporation (“LMAC”) completed its IPO of 57.5 million units (the “Units”). The Units were sold at a price of $10.00 per Unit, generating gross proceeds to LMAC of $575 million. Concurrently with the IPO, LMAC completed the private sale of 10 million warrants to its sponsor, Liberty Media Acquisition Sponsor LLC (the “Sponsor”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Liberty Media and attributed to the Formula One Group tracking stock.


Who Are the Five-Star Generals in U.S. History?

Five U.S. Army generals have held the rank of five-star general, beginning in 1944: George Marshall, Douglas MacArthur, Dwight Eisenhower, Henry Arnold and Omar Bradley. Arnold also became the U.S. Air Force's only five-star general when his title was redesignated as "general of the Air Force" in 1949.

The U.S. Navy bestows a five-star rank, called fleet admiral. William Leahy, Ernest King, Chester Nimitz and William Halsey, Jr. were five-star admirals. Five-star army generals are given the title "general of the Army." The Army gave this title to generals prior to 1944, but the uniform did not include five stars. Previous holders of the general of the Army rank included Ulysses Grant, William Sherman and Philip Sheridan.

Only two men have held the title "general of the Armies of the United States." They are George Washington and John Pershing. Only Pershing held the title during his lifetime, and in accordance with the Army regulations of the time, he wore only four stars. In 1976, President Gerald Ford posthumously awarded the title to George Washington and declared that he would rank first among all Army officers. Admiral George Dewey was given the special "admiral of the Navy" distinction in 1903. As of 2015, he remains the only person ever awarded this title, and it is recognized as senior to the five-star Fleet Admiral rank.


Watch the video: De slag om de Schelde: 23 september 1944 (January 2022).